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September 28, 1984 - Image 98

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1984-09-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

50

Friday, September 28, 1984 THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

A HEALTHY & HAPPY NEW YEAR

KOW KOW INN

Famous For All Chinese Native Foods
American & Cantonese Family Dinners
322 W. McNichols 868-7550

AA7
MY KONGS

OLD PARTHENON
RESTAURANT

SUPRER <LUO

454 EAST LAFAYETTE
DETROIT, MICHIGAN 48226
313-965-3737

579 Monroe
Detroit, Michigan 48226
961-5111

GREEK CUISINE
DINNER SERVED NIGHTLY
from 6:30 p.m. to 1:30 a.m.

LIVE GREEK ENTERTAINMENT
BELLY DANCING
7 DAYS AWEEK

Open 11 a.m. to 3 a.m.

Catering Available

Specializing in Greek Cuisine

BANQUET FACILITIES
AVAILABLE

Shishkebab — Lamb Chops
Steaks — Seafood

RESERVATIONS ACCEPTED

Liquor, Imported Beer and Wine

I

HAPPY NEW YEAR TO OUR CUSTOMERS & FRIENDS

George and Maria Golematis

and the staff
0 .
of

Extend Wishes
To Their
Customers & Friends
For A
Happy & Healthy

NEW
YEAR

40.0
6000

290 N. Woodward
540-7940

Wishing Our Customers
and Friends
HEALTH & HAPPINESS
FOR THE NEW YEAR

44641a4/14
.

Fast & Fresh Cafe

Everything preparedfrom scratch on the premises, using high-
est quality, freshest ingredients by diet-conscious cooks. Great
for Pritikin dieters.

OAKLAND MALL

Best Wishes
For A Joyous
New Year
Filled With
Health and Happiness

.

Miriam and Ron Kottler

SHALOM

Nice people.Taking care of nice people.

Allover the world.

EYA DS

Franklin Road and Northwestern Highway. Just Past 12 Mile in Southfield
(a part of Franklin Center).
Cali 357-4442 for reservations

The Newman Family
and Staff of

STAR DELI

Wish Their Friends
and Customers
A VERY HEALTHY
AND HAPPY

NEW
YEAR

28225 TELEGRAPH ROAD
SOUTHFIELD, MICHIGAN 48034
313-355-2929

WISHING ALL OUR
FRIENDS
AND CUSTOMERS
A HEARTY AND
HAPPY NEW YEAR

■ 410 4610

DDENNisoN6

Seafood Tavern
TWELVE MILE
AT ORCHARD LAKE
FARMINGTON HILLS
553-7000

NEWS

Rabbi dedicates
life to juveniles

,

Jerusalem — Dressed in the
black garb of the Chasidim, with
traditional beard and side-curls,
Rabbi David Isaac Grossman was
often an unusual sight at the dis-
cotheques in Israel's northern de-
velopment towns during the
1960s.
Yet night after night, the tall
and lanky "disco rabbi," as he
came to be called, would frequent
the night spots of Migdal Haemek
and environs in an effort to save
street kids from falling into the
alienation and surrounding pov-
erty.
"The kids couldn't figure out
why I was there," says Rabbi
Grossman about his disco- I
hopping days back in the late '60s.-
"They thought someone died and
that I was looking for a minyan,"
he told Israel Scene magazine re-
cently.
At age 22, Rabbi Grossman, a
Karlin Chasid who lives and
teaches in Jerusalem, first heard
of the rising crime rate among the
youth and new immigrants in
northern Israel.
The rabbi and six friends went.
out onto the streets of Migdal
Haemek and into the discos to
speak to the kids.
A large number of the town's
youth are the children of immig-
rants from Morocco and Tunisia,
and products of broken homes.
Families are often large, and it is
not unusual for a mother to be left
alone to care for a brood of ten.
Even in two-parent homes, it is
often difficult to make ends meet
and maintain a stable emotional
environment.
According to Rabbi Grossman,
many of the young, unsupervised
kids already had older brothers in
jail, and were themselves turning
to drugs and crime.
The rabbi began his social ex-
periment by inviting the boys to
his home for Sabbath dinners.
Fifteen years late, Rabbi
Grossman's network of yeshivot
and his work with prison youth
earned him the Love of Israel
award, presented last June by
President Chaim Herzog.
Rabbi Grossman named his in-
stitutions Migdal Or — Tower of
Light — to defy the town's symbol
of darkness (emek means valley).
Migdal Or consists of two dor.L
mitoryyeshivot for boys aged 10 to
18 from families in the Galilee,
two day schools, six kindergar-
tens and one yeshiva for single
young adults. All told, Migdal Or 1
has nearly 2,000 students.
Orthodox education, which in-
volves approximately six hours of
regular secular study and four
hours of religious study each day
is standard at Migdal Or. Some 80
percent of the students who enter -._
Migdal Or do not come from ob-
servant homes and are not them-
selves Orthodox, and Rabbi
Grossman doesn't try to persuade
them otherwise.
"What's most important," he
says, "is to bring the child back to
himself, to make him a mensch." --
The rabbi's easy-going manner
with the students seems to ac-
count in part for his success. "He's, <I
found the key to their hearts,"
says one teacher. "He's patient
and doesn't try to push them into
accepting anything."

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