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September 28, 1984 - Image 52

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1984-09-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4B

Friday, September 28, 1984

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

A Very i-lappy and Healthy
New Year to All Our Friends
and Family

DR. & MRS. MATHEW
BOROVOY & FAMILY

A Very Happy and Healthy
New Year to All Our Friends
and Family

MARION & MAX SCHAFER

We wish our family and friends a
very healthy, happy and prosperous
New Year

NEWS

ZEE & RAY BERNSTEIN

Israeli helps
the despairing

We wish our family and friends a
very healthy, happy and prosperous
New Year

BY JUDY KRAUSZ

MR. & MRS. TAMARAC,
EDWARD FLORIDA
BURTON & FAMILY

We wish our family and friends a
very healthy, happy and prosperous
New Year

MAURIE
& FLORENCE CASCADE
,

We wish our family and friends a
very healthy, happy and prosperous ,
New Year
.

COOPER & LEHMAN PHYSICAL THERAPY

We wish our family and friends a
very healthy, happy and prosperous
New. Year

May the coming year be
one filled with health,
happiness and
prosperity for all our
friends and family.

DAVE & ESTHER
GOLDSTEIN

To All Our
Relatives
and Friends,
Our wish for a
year filled with
happiness,
health and prosperity

THE GREENS

SEYMOUR & SYLVIA FURMAN

We wish our family and friends a
very healthy, happy and prosperous
New Year

SZMUL JUTKIEWICZ & FAMILY

We wish our family and friends a
very healthy, happy and prosperous
New Year

ALICE & MAX KUSHNER

We wish our family and friends a
very healthy, happy and prosperous
New Year

ELIZABETH, JEFFREY & HALLIE ROSENBAUM

We wish our family and friends a
very healthy, happy and prosperous
New Year

ABRAHAM & TOBY SATOVSKY

MAX, LORRAINE
KAREN & ROBERT

EPERNERIEI

May the New Year Bring
To All Our Friends
and Family
Health,
Joy, Prosperity
and Everything
Good in Life

HENRY & MALA D ORFMAN

.

Wishing all our family and
friends a year of
health and happiness

FLORENCE & IRVING HERMELIN

Wishing all our family and
friends a year of
health and happiness

PEARL & HAROLD AUGUST, FLORI & LINDA SELTZER

- Wishing all our family and
friends a year of
health and happiness

ARTHUR & FLORENCE SHULTZ

-

Tel Aviv — A spare, graceful
man with arresting blue eyes and
a gentle reserve, Patya Dagan, 61,
is a healer of minds on the inti-
mate terms with trauma, loss and
death.
As a psychologist with the Kib-
butz Movement Guidance Center
based in Tel Aviv, Dr. Dagan
counsels patients with a wide
range of problems. But it is in
dealing with death, and particu-
larly the death of loved ones as a
result of war, that his help is most
consistently sought.
"My colleagues tell me that be-
cause of the number tattooed on
my arm I can make contact with
patients," he said in a recent
interview. "Perhaps that is so.
They see that I smile, that I can
talk about mundane things and
they are reassured that it's possi-
ble to adjust."
Recently Dr. Dagan treated a
couple, both Holocaust survivors,
who lost a son in Operation Peace
for Galilee in Lebanon. "Treat
isn't really the proper word," he
reflected. "How can anyone treat
them? I become a sort of partner. I
tell them that one doesn't ever
overcome this kind of loss, one
only learns to live with it.
"My life is different from others.
I live closer to death, with a
greater awareness of its irrever-
sibility. Sometimes getting up
and out in the morning is a gigan-
tic effort. But it's possible.
"In Israel we are tremendously
influenced by wars," he added.
"We are probably the only country
where so many mothers and
fathers bury their sons. It is a
total reverse of the norm, and it
affects our entire society. We are
always aware that we raise sons
who will be soldiers. The fathers,
too, serve in the reserves well into
middle age. Consequently, there
are many fears that are re-
pressed."
Dr. Dagan himself learned to
deal with fear early in life. Reared
in Prague, Czechoslavakia, he
lost both his parents before World
War II, while a teenager. His
older brother and sister managed
to leave the country just before
the Nazi invasion but were unable
to get him out. Alone, he joined a
commune of Zionist teenagers and
young adults without families
and later lived in an agricultural
training farm of young Zionists
preparing to go to Palestine.
IN 1941, at 19, the entire group
was rounded up and sent to
Theresienstadt. Dr. Dagan sur-
vived three years at the camp. In
1944 he was taken to Auschwitz,
and in January 1945, as the Rus-
sians closed in, he was one of 4,000
inmates sent on a forced march.
He was one of the few who sur-
vived.
After the war Dr. Dagan re-
turned to Prague, where he
enrolled in a theater school and
studied psychology. He arrived in
Israel in 1949 — one of thousands
of Czech survivors — in a rescue
operation organized by the
American Jewish Joint Distribu-
tion Committee and the Jewish
Agency for Israel.
His Holocaust experience was
many years ago but it is as close to
him as the numbers tattooed on
his arm. Yet he, his wife who also

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