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September 09, 1983 - Image 107

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1983-09-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

n r ut I KUIlltWIJIFIIM

,

trivayseptemner-sins—lui

100 Years of Settlements Have Reclaimed the Land of Israel

By JANET MOSHE

World Zionist Press Service

And I will plant them
upon their land, and they
shall no more be pulled up
out of their land which I
have given them, saith the
Lord thy God.

Amos 9:15
* * *
Perhaps rural settlement
activity was started in bi-
blical times in the land of
Israel, but the past years
have paved the way for the

Best wishes for a
happy, healthy
New Year

RUTH SCHARG

May the coming

year be filled

with health and

happiness for

rebirth of Jewish national
independence. Even though
the usage of the very term
"settlement" is enough to
raise eyebrows of some
world leaders in the direc-
tion of the Middle East, it is
this very concept that has
helped to populate, feed and
form the boundaries of the
Jewish state for the past 100
years.
As Israel has passed the
centennial mark of settle-
ment (1882-1982), the
length and breadth of the
land of our forebearers re-
flects the drastic change
which has taken place. No
less than 1,000 settlements
today dot Israel's landscape.
New immigrants from all
corners of the world have
joined in a united effort,
their toil and sweat coaxing
better and better crops from
the land, considered by the
British authorities, for
example, to be uncultivable.
Swamps have been
drained making way for fer-

1111311 111111 Mt13`?

to all

all our family

our friends

and friends

and relatives

JEFFREY & KAREN KRAFT,
AIMEE & ELISSA

OTTO & ERIKA HERCZEG

We wish our family and friends a
very healthy, happy and prosperous
New Year

MR. & MRS. LOUIS BORDOLEY

We wish our family and friends a
very healthy, happy and prosperous
New Year

ALBERT, EDITH & JAY CIMMER

tile fields, stones cleared
and even in Israel's deserts
broad patches of green
break the sandy monotone.
In short, the Jews have be-
come a people of the land.

the Camp David agree-
ments, requiring that Sinai
sites be evacuated and
turned over to the Egyp-
tians by April 1982, were
scrupulously carried out.

For many years, set-
tlement has taken high
national priority, and in
the past five years alone
over 200 settlements have
been established. The
vast majority of these are
rural settlements and
have been built under the
auspices of the Settle-
ment Department of the
Jewish Agency and the
Settlement Division of
the World Zionist Organ-
ization.

"We felt as if the carpet
has been pulled out from
under our feet when we
realized our land would
be turned over to Egypt,"
explaines Danny Pasik of
Kibutz Sufa, presently re-
located in the western
Negev. "The move from
the Sinai to our new loca-
tion has not been an easy
one for us to make."

The Six-Day war of 1967
brought changes in-the ob-
jectives of settlement policy,
and new areas of larid
opened up to be farmed and
settled. Revolutionary ways
to exploit arid land were
found, and new markets for
Israel's agricultural exports
opened new horizons.
The thrust of Israeli set-
tlement policy seems to be
in constant change. Since
1967, however, the majority
of new settlements have
been established on the
other side of the "Green
Line" which once separated
Israel and Jordan. Apart
from Judea and Samaria,
settlement of areas of
sparse Jewish population
such as the Galilee have
been given priority, and in
accordance with the peace
agreement concluded with
Egypt, the Besor Region of
the Negev (Pithat Shalom)
has also been developing in-
tensively.
Nine settlements —
seven moshavim and two
kibutzim — were estab-
lished along the new inter-
national border with Egypt
in the Besor Region of the
Negev. Fields, saplings and
many young settlers were
uprooted and relocated as

Only a few years ago set-
tlement policy encouraged
the development of the buf-
fer zone between the Gaza
Strip and the Sinai Desert.
And then, the chance of a
peace agreement with
Egypt led to a change in the
desert's sandscape.
Seven yearg after Danny
and other members of the
first Nahal unit (pioneering
youth corps of the Israel De-
fense Forces) set foot in the
area, stakes had to be pulled
up, and the kibutz began to
rebuild itself once more in
the shifting sands of the
desert. As national policy
changed, the people of Sufa
were responsive, and the
young members rebuilt
their kibutz home, moving
it to the new international
border with Egypt. The
abandoning of Yamit and
neighboring settlements
was only carried out after a
bitter dispute with the
settlers.
Today, the average age of
Kibutz Sufa's residents is
under 30, but most of the
members have struggled
with the desert's hardships
for several years. Their re-
wards include a fine crop of
fruit, flowers and vegeta-
bles for European markets.
In addition, however, they
knew that they are helping
to forge a tight link around
* *

Israel's
borders
and
sparsely poptilated regions.

In a five-year settle-
ment forecast, plans
envision a large distribu-
tion of settlements in the
Galilee, Judea, Samaria,
Golan Heights, Negev,
Jordan Valley, and the
Gaza Strip area. An addi-
tional population of
10,000 families is planned
for rural settlement by
1988.

Making its impression
upon the social and eco-

nomic life in the state of Is-
rael, rural settlement con-
tinues today to enjoy prior-
ity in national planning,
whether the emphasis be
agricultural or industrial.
A small leak will - sink a
great ship.

WE WISH OUR
FRIENDS AND THE

and relatives

JABOTINSKY SOCIETY
OF HERUT
A VERY HEALTHY,
HAPPY AND
PROSPEROUS
NEW YEAR

THE BURDOWSKI'S
REGINA, DAVE & MICHELE

HELEN & SIMON
CIECK

May the coming

May the coming

year be filled

year be filled

with health and

with health and

happiness for

happiness for

all our family

all our family

and friends

and friends

LIZ & LOU FREEMAN

RUTH & FRED KATZ
of Southfield

1111311 i-\iw ill t13"2

to all

our friends

We wish our family and friends a
very healthy, happy and prosperous
New Year

SANDER & DIANE EISENBERG,
CHERI, STEVE & LORI

We wish our family and friends a
very healthy, happy and prosperous
New Year

We wish our family and friends a
very healthy, happy and prosperous
New Year

THE A. GARDIN FAMILY

HARRY & MARY EHRLICH

We wish our family and friends a
very healthy, happy and prosperous
New Year

We wish our family and friends a
very healthy, happy and prosperous
New Year

HENRY & FRANKA IGLEWICZ & DAUGHTER

MARILYN & JACK FLACK & FAMILY

We wish our family and friends a
very healthy, happy and prosperous
New Year

We wish our family and friends a
very.healthy, happy and prosperous
New Year

THE SCHEINKER FAMILY

MR. & MRS. SIMON LEFKOWITZ

PAUL, MARSHA, JEFFREY, AARON & BRADLEY

We wish our family and friends a
very healthy, happy and prosperous
New Year

We wish our family and friends a
very healthy, happy and prosperous
New Year

TOBY & ABE SATOVSKY

REUBEN & MARGARET SNIDER

We wish our family and friends a
very healthy, happy and prosperous
New Year

We wish our family and friends a
very healthy, happy and prosperous
New Year

DOROTHY & REUBEN SHERMAN

Shown in these photographs are new settlements
under construction at Koranit in the Galilee, top
photograph, and Neveh Daniel near Gush Etzion in
Judea.

THE STERN FAMILY

ROZ, BUTCH, RON, TODD & DAVID - Marietta, Georgia

.

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