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May 14, 1982 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1982-05-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Economy Affecting Jewish Agencies

(Continued from Page 1)
concerns facing the
Jewish community, and
that Federation's other
local agencies are coping
withg the situation from
their own perspective.
Federation's budgeting
and planning divisions
are beginning the most
intensive phase of al-
locating funds for the
coming fiscal year they
will have to decide how to
divide the "pie" of avail-
able 1982 Allied Jewish
Campaign proceeds so
( at the agencies' critical
__.,.eeds are met as closely
as possible.
Spokesmen from Jewish
Family Service and Jewish
Vocational Service told the
board they are seeing sig-
nificant changes in their
clientele: more newly un-
employed persons who prey-
iously had held responsible
jobs; more women heading
single-parent families and
without the resources or job
experience to cope finan-
cially; and life-style prob-
lems which stem from these
events.
Albert Ascher, executive
director of Jewish Voca-
tional Service, said that in
the past most job counseling
clients were working but
were seeking upgrading;
two-thirds of those cur-
rently in counseling are un-
employed. Many are young
people in their 20s, unpre-
pared economically for the
recession and unprepared
psychologically for the
"failure" they think it im-
plies. Further, an increas-
ing number of students are
seeking JVS scholarship
aid.
In another area, federal
cutbacks and reductions in
state funding have affected
rehabilitation programs
that have been a vital part
of JVS in its service to the
mentally and physically
handicapped. One conse-

quence of the economic
downturn, said Ascher in
citing an example, is that
some retarded persons who
were enabled to find jobs
considered menial are "now
losing them to able-bodied
people."
Margaret
Weiner,
assistant director of the
Jewish Family Service,
said that the agency al-
ways has dealt with "at-
risk" clients: unmarried
mothers, children from
broken homes, aged, iso-
lated persons. Currently,
she said, 43 percent of the
agency's clientele are re-
ceiving some type of fi-
nancial assistance; of
these, three-quarters are
elderly, living on Social
Security and small pen-
sions.
From July 1981, when
JFS first participated in a
United Foundation pro-
gram to counsel the unem-
ployed and under-
employed, until February
1982, 70 persons sought
such assistance from the
agency, "and it's going up
each month," Mrs. Weiner
said. For these people, un-
employment is "a
psychological catastrophe"
— the fact of their previous
success as wage earners
contributes to their feelings
of humiliation and guilt.
Children who used to do
well in school are experienc-
ing stress as a result of fam-
ily dislocation. Mrs. Weiner
said that a counseling group
set up for adolescents had to
be arranged at night "be-
cause all of them had to
work during the day."
The agency spokesmen
said that with additional
United Foundation and
Federation funding, it has
been possible to increase
staff assistance somewhat
in the emergency. However,
other avenues of funding
must be pursued vigorously
since. it can be expected that

* * *

UHS Announces Cutbacks

The following is excerp-
ted from a statement issued
this week by the United He-
brew Schools:
"The United Hebrew
Schools of Metropolitan De-
troit is in the process of re-
organization and change to
make the institution more
educationally efficient. The
board of directors of the
United Hebrew Schools is
grappling with the problem
of an inflationary budget
and is attempting to develop
ogram that is consistent
h the goals and objec-
tives of an intensive He-
brew program .. .
"In order to continue the
high level and high quality
of service to the Jewish
community, the United He-
brew Schools is forced to cut
back on some of its services
in order to survive in the
current inflationary cli-
mate.
"The United Hebrew
Schools will be unable to
offer, during the course
of the next year, take-
home transportation for
our children. We will

v

provide transportation
from the public school to
the United Hebrew
Schools. The reason is
that we are currently
servicing single parent
families and working
parents who are unable
to bring their children to
school in the afternoon.
"We are also forced to cut
back on the number of days
of our high school. Our stu-
dents will still maintain the
high level of an eight-
hour-per-week intensive
Hebraica and Judaica pro-
gram on the high school
level. The school will meet
on Tuesday and Thursday
afternoons and on Sunday
mornings.
"The new structure will
permit greater flexibility of
instructors, greater flexibil-
ity for students on acceler-
ated levels and greater
opportunity for social and
informal programming. The
United Hebrew Schools has
also been forced to cut back
on some teaching positions

57

V G

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further deterioration in
conditions will develop.
JVS President Nora
Barron announced that
the agency has just re-
ceived from United
Community Services and
the Hudson-Weber
Foundation a $40,000
grant which will help
service newly unem-
ployed persons, primar-
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by six family service
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ropolitan area.
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whose president, Helen
Shevin, helped introduce
the subject at the Board of
Governors meeting, has
funded a significant cash re-
lief program for 15 years
and serviced poor clients
ever since JFS opened its
doors.
Federation
Vice
President Dr. Conrad L.
Giles reported that national
concerns over the economy
and its impact also were ex-
pressed at the quarterly
meeting of the Council of
Jewish Federations in
Washington. The_CJF board
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take an active part in social
action programs, coalitions
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keep public officials in-
formed about the effects of
budget reductions.
Carolyn Greenberg, a
member of the CJF
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as a result of the economic
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