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May 15, 1981 - Image 29

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1981-05-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Friday, May 15, 1981 29

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

for Samuel, Jean Frankel
Jerusalem School Named has
electives in drama, Torah reading, archeology

Boris Smolar's

`Between You
. . . and Me'

Editor-in-Chief
Emeritus, JTA

JERUSALEM — The curricula in the areas of Bi-
dance, music, sports, _ arts, and others.
cornerstone was laid Tues- ble, holidays and prayer and
day for a new, two-story
school building for Bet Sefer
Mamlachti Bet-Givat Shap-
ira (Traditional). Attending
the ceremonies for the five-
year-old school were De-
troiters Samuel and Jean
Frankel, for whom the
building will be named.
Jerusalem Mayor Teddy
Kollek was one of the dig-
nitaries at the event, which
was also attended by Educa-
tion Ministry officials.
The school began five
years ago with 33 stu-
dents, and now has 300. It
describes itself as com-
mitted to a "pluralistic
approach and the foster-
(ALSO HALLS, OFFICES, ETC.)
ing of an understanding
between Jews of various
backgrounds and obser-
DELICIOUS FOOD ELEGANTLY SERVED
vances."
It has been called a model
PERSONALLY SUPERVISED BY
school by Israel Minister of
Education Zevuluri" Ham-
SHIRLEE BLOOM
mer. It has created original

(Copyright 1981, JT-4,--Inc.)
JDC IN ACTION: The Joint Distribution Committee
— the lifeline of the American Jewish community around
the world — came to its two-day semi-annual meeting in
New York this week with a number of important achieve-
ments. Outstanding among them are the re-establishment
of direct JDC aid to Jewish communities in Czechoslovakia
and to the remnant of the Jewish community in Egypt.
The direct relations with the communities of these two
countries have been established with the approval of the
respective governments following visits made early this
year to Prague and Cairo by Henry Taub, JDC president,
and Ralph Goldman, executive vice president. This is the
first time in 30 years that the JDC established association
with the Jewish community in Czechoslovakia; the JDC
office in Prague had been ordered closed by the authorities
in 1950. It is also the first time since the Arab war against
Israel that the JDC was permitted to provide relief for the
Jews in the country directly.
The Jewish community in Czechoslovakia is one of the
oldest Jewish communities in Europe; Jews have been liv-
ing in Prague for more than 1,000 years. The legend of the
"Golem" originated in Prague at the end of the 16th Cen-
tury to prevent anti-Jewish disturbances.
With the resumption of direct contact with the Jewish
community in Czechoslovakia, the JDC is now operating
practically in all Communist countries in Eastern Europe,
except the Soviet Union. The government of Poland, which
ousted the JDC in 1967, has now, at its own initiative,
indicated willingness to permit the JDC to resume its relief
program for the approximately 5,000 Jews who still live in
Poland.
NEW JDC GOALS: The JDC leadership came to its
semi-annual meeting with new goals. One of them is to
reach distant and isolated small communities in corners of
the globe where very small numbers of Jews live. Another
goal is to explore the idea of establishing an international
committee for enhancing communication and cooperation
between JDC and the leadership of Jewish communities in
other free countries.
The JDC has been extending help to distant com-
munities like in China, Ethiopia, India — but not to others.
JDC leaders feel that the relief agency should become more
responsive in Burma where a very small Jewish commu-
nity functions in Rangoon, as well as in other distant
places.
The idea of establishing an international committee
emanates from a recent visit to Australia by Donald Robin-
son, chairman of the JDC board, and Henry Zucker, Ameri-
can Jewish social worker and member of the JDC execu-
tive. They went to Australia to study Jewish life there, and
were warmly received by the Jewish community leaders in
Melbourne and Sidney where 65,000 of Australia's 70,000
Jewish population live.
The report brought by them to the JDC executive in
New York emphasizes that the Jewish communities in
Australia love their country and are optimistic. Jews there
can be found as leaders in business, commercial, profes-
sional, artistic and political life. The current governor gen-
eral of the country, Sir Zelman Cowen, is Jewish, as was
one prior governor general, Sir Isaac Isaacs.
The JDC leaders also established that Jewish reli-
gious, health, welfare and cultural institutions in Au
stralia do quite well, and that they compare favorably in
quality with their American counterparts. Also, that
fund-raising for Israel — which is not tax deductible — is
substantial. Australia, which has already absorbed some
4,300 refugees from the Soviet Union, stands ready to
admit as many Jews from the USSR as wish to immigrate
_ into the country.
At the same time, the JDC leaders established that
assimilation is becoming a problem for the Jewish commu-
nity in Australia, and that the Jewish community in Mel-
bourne is greatly affected by an increase of the Arab popu-
lation — some 17,000 Lebanese, mostly Christian, came
into Australia last year. The Arab community in Australia
today already exceeds the Jewish community.
Jewish leaders in Australia feel isolated to a certain
extent because of the country's long distance from the main
Jewish centers in the world. They would, therefore, wel-
come a closer association with the JDC and with the Ameri-
can Jewish community in general.

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MATHILDA BRAILOVE

NEW YORK — Mathilda
Brailove of Elizabeth, N.J.,
former United Jewish Ap-
peal Women's Division na-
tional chairman, will re-
ceive the Adele Rosenwald
Levy Award "for inspiring
and dedicated leadership in
Jewish communal life" dur-
ing the UJA National Lead-
ership Conference this
weekend at the Sheraton-
Washington Hotel in Wash-
ington, D.C.
Mrs. Brailove, who has
been active in Jewish af-
fairs since 1938, is only the
second person to receive this
award.

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DESIGNERS OF FINE FURS

Fisher to Get Kaplun Prize

PHILADELPHIA —
Maxwell M. Rabb, United
Sttes Ambassador-
Designate to Italy, will pre-
sent the annual Morris-- J.
Kaplun _Prize to Max M.

Fisher, Detroit industrialist
- philanthropist, May 28 at
the annual dinner meeting
of the board of governors of
Dropsie University at the
Franklin Plaza Hotel.

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