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October 12, 1979 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1979-10-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

14

Friday, October 12, 1919

riASSPORT ,
PHOTOS

IN COLOR
WHILE YOU WAIT
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00

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LENS OPENING

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:Opt M, T, w, Sat. 9-6; Tk., F 9-8; Su. 12-5
APPIEDATE SOUK • NORINIVESTERI al INESTER

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Dayan and Ghali at Odds in Europe

STRASBOURG (JTA) —
Foreign Minister Moshe
Dayan of Israel and Egypt's
Foreign Minister Butros
Ghali explained their coun-
tries' respective views and
interpretations of the Camp
David agreements and the
ongoing peace process in the
Middle East to the par-
liamentary assembly of the
Council of Europe at its
opening session on Wednes-
day.
The Egyptian diplomat,
who spoke first, clearly

sought to put Israel on the
defensive.
According to Ghali, the
major difference is that
Egypt wants a general and
comprehensive peace in the
region while Israel insists
on bilateral negotiations. In
that connection he accused
Israel of trying to isolate
Egypt from its partners and
friends. Dayan responded
that the Camp David
agreements are the only
realistic framework for the
promotion of peace and they

cannot be deviated from. He
repeated that point several
times in his presentation.
The two ministers
clashed over the issue of
the Palestine Liberation
Organization. Ghali
called on the Europeans
to undertake diplomatic
action aimed at establish-
ing a dialogue between
the United States, Israel
and the PLO. Dayan de-
clared repeatedly that Is-
rael would never sit
down with that terrorist
organization whose prac-
tice is to murder Israeli
citizens and whose goal is
the liquidation of the
Jewish state.
Ghali told the United Na-
tions last.week that the cur-
rent negotiations over au-
tonomy for the West Bank
and Gaza Strip are not
"deadlocked" but that "a
green light" from the PLO
to the Palestinians in those
territories is needed before
they will join in the negotia-
tions. He indicated that
U.S. contacts with the PLO
were necessary to bring that
about.

WICS Honors
Mrs. Weiner

UNIQUE BLEND OF TRADITIONAL, CHASSIDIC,
CANTORIAL, AND MODERN ISRAELI STYLE
WITH POPULAR AMERICAN SOUND.

JOSEPHINE WEINER

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1919 7:45

Josephine Weiner, former
national president of the
National Council of Jewish
Women, is being acclaimed
by Women in Community
Service with its Rosa Parks
Award.
Mrs. Weiner has been
president of the Jewish
Juniors and a member of the
board of Hebrew Univer-
sity, United Community
Services, American Israel
Public Affairs Committee
and the National Center for
Voluntary Action.
She has been a WICS
volunteer and national
president. She edited the
Bicentennial American
Issues Forum Pamphlet
and has just completed
"The Story of WICS," an
official history.
In 1974, she received the
Hannah G. Solomon Award
of the Greater Detroit Sec-
tion, NCJW.

PM

Congregation B'nai Moshe
Oak Park
14390 W. Ten Mile Rd.



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Editor-in-Chief
Emeritus, JTA
' (Copyright 1979, JTA, Inc.)

TAKING INVENTORY: Anticipating 30;000 or more
Soviet Jews to arrive in this country during the next 12
months, some of the major Jewish communities are now
conducting local surveys of the Soviet Jewish emigres al-
ready absorbed by them. The communities are taking "in-
ventory" of the resettleinent problems as well as how these
problems were solved. Their surveys also seek to establish,
among other things, the motives of the immigrants ford\
becoming "drop-outs" and proceeding to the United States
instead of to Israel.
The question of "drop-outs" — a thorny issue between
the Jewish Agency and leaders of the American Jewish
community — has drawn special attention of Jewish aca-
demicians in this country who are experts in Soviet affairs.
They discussed it at great length at a two-day conference on
the integration of Soviet Jews into the American Jewish
community. The conference, held in Baltimore, was ar-
ranged by the Baltimore Hebrew College and sponsored by
the Council of Jewish Federations, national HIAS, the
Associated Jewish Charities and Welfare Fund of Balti-
more, and other national and local agencies.
The general consensus of the participants — especially
of the professors who addressed the sessions — was that the
American Jewish community must not hamper immigra-
tion of "drop-outs" to the United States; that the doors must
remain open to immigration, no matter how large the
number of immigrants will be and how heavy a burden on
the communities absorbing them. Some expressed the opin-
ion that the "drop-outs" are actually not drop-outs since
they were never in the Zionist groups from which they
parted upon crossing the Soviet border.
Prof. Jerome Gilison, who spent 20 years in the field of
Soviet studies, including residence in the Soviet Union,
called the designation "drop-outs" a misnomer. He divided
the Soviet emigration into two waves, partly overlapping.
The first wave — which reached its zenith in the early '70s
— consisted of Jews with primarily nationalistic Jewish
motivations for leaving Russia. The second wave, he as-
serted, had no special feeling for Israel but was mostly
motivated by fear for anti-Semitism and desire for a better
quality of life.
A similar opinion was expressed by Prof. Zvi Gitelman,
who added that the potential Jewish emigrants in Russia
were influenced by letters from Soviet immigrants in Israel
who though by and large well-integrated — have written
to friends in the Soviet Union on the objective and subjec-
tive difficulties of absorption in Israel. Prof. Gitelman
made detailed studies of Soviet Jewish immigrants in the
United States and Israel. He conducted a survey of Soviet
Jewish immigrants in the Detroit area for the University of
Michigan and the Jewish Family Service in Detroit.
PROFESSORS AND `DROP-OUTS": Prof. Gilison,
in advocating unhampered admission of Soviet Jews who
prefer to settle in the United States rather than in Israel,
made it a point to emphasize that to pressure current im-
migrants to go to Israel when they insist on going to the
United States would be "immoral and self-defeating." The
net result, he asserted, would probably be to reduce the flow
of immigration entirely, and in effect to become ac-
complices of the Soviet government.
Sharing his view were Dr. Yakov Rabkin, a Soviet
Jewish emigre who is currently a professor at the Univer-
sity of Montreal; Dr. Robert Osborn of Temple University,
top U.S. specialist on the Soviet welfare system; and Dr.
Robert Freedman, professor of political science at the Bal-
timore Hebrew College.
The Soviet government, Freedman said, seems to be
welcoming the fact that many of the emigrants prefer to go
to the United States rather than to Israel because this
diversion helps the_Kremlin with the Arabs who are pro-
testing the Soviet'g permission for Jews to emigrate tc
Israel.
SOME OPINIONS: Eleven percent of those surveyed
in the Detroit area said that they would not leave the USSR
had they to do it all over. In Baltimore, the emigres do not
seem to have any misgivings about their choice of a new
homeland. When asked what advice they would give to
someone like themselves still living in the Soviet Union, 70
percent said they would recommend emigration to the U.S.;
only six percent recommended emigration to Israel, and
about two percent suggested remaining in the Soviet
Union.

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Romania Installs Israeli Rabbi

and HOSPITAL SUPPLY, Inc.

BUCHAREST (JTA) — Romanian Jewish corn-
An Israeli rabbi, Dr. Karl munities.
Jolles, was installed as
The earth is the Lord's
rabbi of the city of Cluj and
another dozen smaller and the fullness thereof.

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