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January 12, 1979 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1979-01-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

12 Friday, January 12, 1979

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Ehrlich Expects M.E. Peace

JERUSALEM (JTA) —

Finance Minister Simha
Ehrlich predicts that a
peace treaty with Egypt will
be signed soon because
"only two or three points"
that are "not so significant"
remain to be settled.
Addressing the
Jerusalem Economic Club,
Ehrlich criticized the
United States by implica-
tion for the way that it has

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SIMHA EHRLICH

handled the outstanding is-
sues in dispute. He spoke of
"haste by a certain party —
not Israel — which has been
ill-advised." •
The Finance Minister
also warned that the con-
clusion of a peace treaty
would bring "three tough
years in economic terms" for
Israel. "The central ques-
tions," he said, are "is it
worth it, and will Israel pull
through the three lean
years? My answer to both is
a resounding yes."
Ehrlich pledged a "war
unto death" against "black
money," meaning unde-
clared taxable income. "If
we don't destroy it, it will
destroy us," he told the
audience of businessmen.
He said the battles against
tax evaders and inflation
were his ministry's top
priority.

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NEW YORK — Yavneh,
the National Religious
Jewish Students Associa-
tion, is continuing a year-
long program of planned
studies of the 21 books of the
Prophets and the 13 books of
holy writings (Ktuvim) to
prepare religious students
against missionaries.
The organization said
campus missionaries often
quote biblical passages out
of context.
Copies of the study
schedule are available from
the Yavneh office, 25 W.
26th St., New York 10010.

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WJCongress to Aid Iran Jews

TEL AVIV (JTA) —
Philip M. Klutznick,
president of the World
Jewish Congress, said that
the WJC stands ready to use
its wide political connec-
tions on behalf of Jews wish-
ing to leave Iran.
Addressing a meeting of
the WJC's Israeli Executive
here, both he and former
WJC president, Dr. Nahum
Goldmann expressed dis-
may that until now most
Iranian Jews have chosen to
remain in their country de-
spite the turmoil and their
uncertain future.
The Joint Distribution
Committee and the Jewish
Agency have readied the
means for transferring Ira-
nian Jews, yet they do not
want to leave, Klutznick
stated.
He noted that while the
WJC is not a rescue
organization and lacks
the manpower and
machinery for a rescue
operation, it has access to
influential political cir-
cles and every channel is
open to act on behalf of
Iranian Jews.
Iranian Jews not only are
not leaving for Israel in sub-
stantial numbers but some
already in Israel are return-
ing, hoping that the new
civilian government in
Teheran will be able to re-
store law and order.
Solel Boneh, the Histad-
rut construction company,
has suspended its work on
three projects in Iran and is
bringing home its workers
and engineers. Only five
supervisors will remain in
Iran for the time being to
look after the $2 million=
worth of equipment left be-
hind.
Meanwhile, Rabbi Moshe
Milstein, international
executive vice president of
Ozar Hatorah (Love of To-
rah), said he has received
reports from the Ozar
Hatorah staff in Iran that
its schools there have been
open for a total of 30 school
days since the beginning of

French Jews
Protest Against
Anti-Semitism

PARIS (JTA) — Some
2,000 Jews marched
through the Paris suburb of
Drancy Sunday in a peace-
ful demonstration against
the resurgence of anti-
Semitism in France.
The marchers first
attended a religious cere-
mony at the site of the
Drancy synagogue, which
was burned down last
month in what French
Jewish organizations
termed an anti-Semitic at-
tack.
Drancy holds particularly
painful memories for
French Jews. Thousands
were held in a transit camp
during World War II before
being sent to their deaths in
Nazi concentration camps.
Drancy's Communist mayor
and several local members
of Parliament participated
in Sunday's march, which
organizers said was aimed
at drawing attention to all
forms of racism in France.

this semester last Sep-
tember, which included the
period of the recent distur-
bances. The Iranian school
year consists of 130 school
days compared to 180 days
in the United States.
According to the re-
ports, disturbances were
monitored daily and
when it was determined
that school attendance
would interfere with
safety, the programs
were suspended. Even
during those periods the
educational process for
students attending the
Ozar Hatorah schools
continued in local

* *

synagogues with the help
of the schools staffs.

Milstein said that accord-
ing to the reports he re-
ceived the synagogues have
become the temporary edu-
cational facilities in Iran.

Ozar Hatorah services
about 4,500 students
throughout Iran, Milstein
said. There are more than
40 schools throughout the
country. Ozar Hatorah,
which is the only school sys-
tem in Iran that provides
Jewish education, accord-
ing to Milstein, also heli
schools in France, Morocc
and Syria.

Iran Troubles Don't Hamper
Oil Supplies Held by Israel

JERUSALEM (JTA) —
Energy Minister Yitzhak
Modai assured Israelis that
the country's oil supplies
were not in danger as a re-
sult of the turmoil in Iran.
He said, in an Israel
Radio interview, that there
was "no need and no wish
yet" to invoke the 1975
agreement by which the
United States pledged to
guarantee Israel's oil
supplies in case of an emer-
gency.
Modal implied that Israel
has increased its oil imports
from other sources to make
up for the curtailed produc-
tion in Iran. The "big ques-
tion" he said was how long it
would be before Iranian oil
exports return to normal.
Iran reportedly
supplied Israel with
about 300,000 barrels a
day. But as a result of the
turmoil in Iran, ship-
ments of oil to Israel, as to
other countries, was
halted Dec. 27.
Israel never officially con-
firmed its oil purchases
from Iran and the oil, in
fact, was never sold directly
to Israel but through a third
party. Shipments to Israel
were listed officially as
going to Gibraltar.
Officials said Israel con-
sumes 7.5 million tons of
crude oil a year, a daily con-
sumption of about 150,000
barrels. About 15 percent
comes from internal sources
and some 6.5 million tons is
imported at a cost of $300
million a year. The Ameri-
can commitment to guaran-
tee Israel's oil needs was
part of the 1975 Sinai
interim agreement between
Israel and Egypt.
There was some question
here as to whether the
American pledge was
limited to a five-year period
from the date of the agree-
ment. Officials explained
that the pledge would be in
force for a five-year period
after Israel officially in-
voked it.
Modai said there is no
doubt or dispute over the
American commitment.
This is "very clear," he
said, but Israel is not
about to implement it be-
cause its present supplies
of oil are adequate.
(In Washington, Energy
Secretary James
Schlesinger declared that

the United States would
honor its agreements to
provide oil to Israel in case
Israel's oil supply situation
will be affected as a result of
the turmoil in Iran. "There
is the possibility of the ex-
port of north slope (Alaska)
crude to Israel to alleviate
the situation," Schlesinger
said.
He said the U.S. will as-
sist Israel in efforts to find
an alternate source of crude
oil, but in accord with bilat-
eral agreements between
the two nations the U.S.
would supply Israel with
oil.)
(In Teheran, Iran's Prime
Minister-designate, Dr.
Shapur Bakhtiar, told re-
porters that his government
would refuse to sell oil to Is-
rael and South Africa. Ad-
dressing a press conference
after being nominated as
prime minister by both
houses of parliament, he
said Iran would sell oil to
countries requesting it.
(Asked if oil would be
sold to Israel and South
Africa, he replied: "Given
the conflict that opposes
us in a religious context
to Israel, and in another
context to South Africa, I
think my government
will not do that.")
Oil experts in Israel note
that there is no global oil
shortage. Most oil import-
ing countries, including Is-
rael, laid in large supplies
after the Arab oil embargo
of 1973 to meet any future
crisis.

Hospital Guide

NEW YORK (JTA) — A
32-page resource manna'
providing information c
the rights of Jewish
patients entering New York
City's hospitals has been
published by Agudath Is-
rael of America.

The various sections
cover the role of the Jewish
chaplain, arranging for
kosher food and for other
religious services, visiting
the sick societies, accom-
modations for family mem-
bers, patient representa-
tives, facts about hospitals
in the New York metropoli-
tan area and listings of
community agencies and
rabbinic groups.

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