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August 04, 1978 - Image 30

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1978-08-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



30 Friday, August 4, 1978

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

STEPHENSON
CLUB
24931 N. CHRYSLER DR. (I-75 at 10 Milo)

Hazel Park

PRIVATE BANOUET FACILITIES

By HERBERT G. LUFT

542-9196

FOR 25 TO 300

• Anniversaries
• Weddings
• Bar Mitzvas'
• Parties For All
• Showers
• Bat Mitzvas.
Occasions
• Reunions
• Banquets
Open Mon, Thru Sat.. featuring Fine Steaks. Noble Wines. Casual
Elegance, Gourmet Salad Bar, (over 37 items, incl. creamed her •
ring, deviled eggs. etc.) House Specialties: Chateaubriand. Fresh
Seafood Daily. Roast Long Island Duck-
BRING THIS AD
ling...Prepared By Chef Richard Lavoie .
FREE
SHRIMP COCKTAIL
wet,
dinner

Entertainment

Hours: Mon.-Fri..11 a.m. to 2 a.m.
Sat.. 4 p.m. to 2 a.m.

OPEN SUNDAYS FOR PRIVATE PANTIES ONLY

CIRO'S

FAMILY DINING & PIZZERIA

k SUN

3-DAY SPECIAL -IRL,

ALL YOU CAN EAT!

FISH & CHIPS

Cole Slaw & Bread

OR

SPAGHETTI

Salad & Bread

$299

1535 CASS LAKE RD. — KEEGO — 681-3440



1 MILE NORTH OF ORCHARD LAKE RD.

NOW SERVING WITH ALL DINNERS

Plus

OUR OWN HOUSE POTATO

(Copyright 1978, JTA, Inc.)


RAYMOND STROSS,

HOLLYWOOD

British-born, Hollywood-
based film producer, who
was out of circulation for
several years after undergo-
ing major heart surgery,
now has completed a highly
controversial picture, "Good
Luck Miss Wyckoff." It is
based- on the late William
Inge's only novel with a
screenplay by Polly Platt (of
"Pretty Baby").
It deals with rape and
humiliation of a white,
small-town school teacher
by a young black student.
Marvin Chomsky, who had
guided the "Entebbe" pic-
ture at Warners and televi-
sion episodes of "Roots" as
well as the whole series of
"Holocaust," directed "Miss
Wyckoff' on rural locations
and in the studios of Hol-
lywood.
Anne Heywood, the pro-
ducer's wife, stars in the
title role, with John
Lafayette, a young black
actor from the New York
stage, making his screen
debut, surrounded by
Donald Pleasence, Robert
Vaughn, Earl Holliman and
Ronee Blakely. Stross tells

THIS SUNDAY ONLY — ALL DAY.
PRIME RIB or
VEAL MILANESE

TUESDAYS THRU SATURDAYS
ANTIPASTO

INCL: SHRIMP & ALASKAN KING CRAB

The Hollywood Scene — Potpourri of Events

COMPLETE WITH $5
SALAD, SOUP,
SPAGHETTI,
BREADSTICKS,
BREAD & BUTTER

9

5

AND SALAD, SOUP & SPAGHETTI
11 a.m. b 2 a.m. — SWATS 2 p.m. b 10 p.m. 0
OPEN TUES.-SAT.,



4

GARLIC BREAD

DANCING FRI. & SAT. TO

WITH THIS COUPON

1

TYRONE & CO.

"Matilda," based on a book
by Paul Gallico, Gould por-
trays a small-time, quick-
buck, fast-talking booking
agent who discovers the
commercial possibilities of
promoting a boxing kan-
garoo to a contender for the
world's heavyweight
championship.
RUTH GORDON, the
81-year-old author and
comedienne, tops Elliott
Gould's boxing kanagaroo
by appearing in a forthcom-
ing Clint Eastwood adven-
ture with a kissing oran-
gutan, who hugged and
kissed her politely accord-
ing to the script.
Ms. Gordon, who made
her first stage appearance
with Maude Adams in "Pe-
ter Pan" in 1915, for many
years the wife of writer-
producer-director Gerson
Kanin, only recently came
out of semi-retirement
when her "cult" picture
"Harold and Maude" was
re-released after a seven-
year hiatus.
Her characterization of
the life-hungry Maude who
introduces a teen-aged boy
to the facts of love has
charmed audiences from
New York to California.
Long lines formed at the
theaters in Los Angeles to
view the eccentric Maude
alias Ruth Gordon on sc-
reen. Last month in San
Francisco, she appeared in
the novel role of a guest lec-
turer on sex and motion pic-
tures.
MARK ROBSON, who
won world recognition 30
years ago directing the
Stanley Kramer picture

SPECIALIZING IN .
• BARBEQUED SPARE RIBS
• BARBEQUED CHICKEN
• FRESH SEA FOOD
• COMPLETE MENU .
• CHOICE COCKTAILS
FAMILY DINING AT ITS BEST

L FJOY
o
L6 5 14 0.8

11.4 0 N. TELEGRAPH12/2

FREE

me that the William Inge
property had been pub-
lished in 1964 but tied up in
an option for many a year.
I met Raymond Stross
first at the presentation to
him of the Samuel Goldwyn
Award for "The Mark," his
production of 1961, in its en-
tirety photographed in Ire-
land and starring Stuart
Whitman. '
In Greece, he filmed Leon
Uris' World War II epic,
"The Angry Hills;" in
Czechoslovakia "Ninety
Degrees in the Shade;" in
London "The Leather
Boys," the Gillian Freeman
story which was the first
one to touch openly upon the
subject of homosexuality.
In Canada, he made the
much talked-about three-
character drama "The Fox,"
from the pen of D.H. Lawr-
ence for which he received
the foreign film award from
the Hollywood Foreign
Press in 1968. "Wyckoff" is
Raymond Stross' 30th pic-
ture as a producer.
ELLIOTT GOULD re-
nders two entirely different
but equally effective
characterizations in a
couple of motion pictures
currently on the screen in
Hollywood. There is Paul N.
Lazarus III's proarction of
"Capricorn I," a science-
fiction yarn of conspiracy
and deception involving our
space agency in a $1 billion
hoax, in which he appears in
the straight role of a serious
journalist who stumbles
upon a faked, manned space
mission to the planet Mars
in the not too distant future.
In Albert S. Ruddy's

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Sat. 5 to 12 Sun.. 12 fo 12

11180 TELEGRAPH

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"Champion"
which
catapulted Kirk Douglas to
the top, last month was
stricken with a massive
heart attack while complet-
ing "Avalanche Express" in
the studio's of Rome. He was
flown to London where he
died June 20.
Robson was a true pioneer
of film making. Starting in
the property department of
Fox in 1932, he became an
assistant cutter and later
film editor at RKO to ad-
vance to directing low-
budget, high quality mys-
tery thrillers.

In 1949, he surprised
everyone with "Champion"
and the highly controver-
sial "Home of the Brave,"
both for Stanley Kramer
and United Artists. "Av-
alanche ExpAs" was Rob-
son's first film since the
spectacular "Earthquake"
which he made for Univer-
sal some four years ago.

Jewish Holiday
Calendar Printed

NEW YORK — Harold
M. Jacobs, president of the
Union of Orthodox Jewish
Congregations of America,
issued a call for school ad-
ministrators to note that
this year Jewish students
will miss up to 12 days of
classes due to Jewish holi-

days.

Jacobs said: "According to
Jewish law, Jewish stu-
dents are not permitted to
attend classes, do school
work or write examinations
on each of these days." He
requested that "school ad-
ministrators notify teachers
and take the Jewish calen-
dar into account when
planning examination
schedules and school calen-
dars."

The Union of Orthodox
Jewish Congregations of
America makes available a
special Jewish Holiday
Calendar specifically for
this purpose. The pocket
size calendar contains a
special quick rederence for
holiday dates from 1978
through 1999 by academic
year and a brief explanation
of the holidays and the rules
governing their obser-
vances. The calendar is av-
ailable from the UOJCA,
116 E. 27th St., New York
10016. There is a charge.

Catalogue Printed
on Rare Books

NEW YORK — Ktav
Publishing House has pub-
lished for the first time
"Bibliographic Studies and
Notes on Rare Books and
Manuscripts in the Library
of The Jewish Theological
Seminary of America."

This partial record of rare
books, manuscripts, and in-
cunabula in the library of
the Jewish Theological
Seminary is edited and in-
troduced by Dr. Menahem
Schmelzer, seminary libra-
rian, with a foreword by
seminary Chancellor Ger-
son D. Cohen.

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