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April 07, 1978 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1978-04-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

" - T.27r-7 Z.- .VM11. !



8

'Friday, April 1, 1 1918

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Hungary Communists Easing Some Restrictions on Religions

(Editor's note: The fol-
lowing analysis was pre-
pared by the European

office of the American
Jewish Committee.)
NEW YORK — Hun-

NEW CADILLAC?

BUY OR LEASE FROM

ANDY BLAU

in BIRMINGHAM at

WILSON-CRISSMAN CADILLAC

CALL BUS. MI 4-1930
RES. 642-6836
1350 N. WOODWARD, BIRMINGHAM

gary's Jewish community of
over 80,000, largest in
Europe outside of the Soviet
Union, is well-integrated,
stable and relatively pros-
perous. There are more rab-
bis and functioning
synagogues than in
neighboring lands, and the
Jewish high schools and
yeshiva in Budapest, where
most Jews reside, are un-
ique in the Communist
world.

Last December, when the
Central Board of Hunga-
rian Jews celebrated the
centennial of Budapest's
Jewish Theological Semi-
nary (whose 16 students in-
clude three from the USSR
and one from Czechos-
lovakia), the event received
media coverage throughout
the country and the lighting
of a yard-high Hanuka
menora was witnessed by
Secretary of State Imre

Miklos.
Miklos' presence indi-
cated that the Hungarian
government approved the
celebration. He told the as-
s emblage that Hungary
"supports and cultivates the
development of relation-
ships" between Hungarian
Jews and the Jewish com-
munities of the USSR and
Eastern and Western
Europe, provided there is no
interference in each coun-

Would you pa
$1,000 for $1,5

Fotsr Fkozeee's- oawce..
/gmlorr- seati Him move-

rfoesr site 'wan
criaRtics. ;wee..

_THat

We pay 7.75% annual interest on a six-year
certificate savings account; no place pays a higher
rate of interest, and many places (possibly the one
where you're saving) are not allowed to pay as
much.
To earn this high interest—which is an
effective annual rate of 7.98%—just deposit
$1,000 or more and leave it in the account for the
,!!W .---- ■ .J full six years. When you do, your $1,000 will increase
by more than half and total $1,584.
As you can see in the chart, this account is just one of many
certificate savings plans we offer, all designed to help you have
more money than you started with. Any of these accounts—
even more than one—can be opened in addition to your First
Federal Regular Savings Account. In fact, our Regular Savings
Account is how many people get the $1,000 for the certificate
account.

Come and talk with us about your savings goals. We'll help

Type of
Account

One- Year
Certificate'

Minimum Annual
Effective
Amount
Rate Annual Rate

How and
When Paid

Paid and compounded
quarterly.

$1 , 000

6.50%

6.66%

$1,000

6.75%

6. 92 %

Certificate'

$1,000

7.50%

7.71%

Paid and compounded
quarterly.

6-Year
Certificate'

$1,000

7.75%

7.98%

Paid and compounded
quarterly.

21 /2- Year

Certificate'

4- Year

Paid and compounded
quarterly.

eral regulations require a sub lanual ente est penally for ear
y wandrawAl horn cert.hcale saweng

accounts

you plan how much to put where and for how long. We'll even
explain how to get a check each month for the interest you earn.
If you already have a regular savings account or a maturing
certificate somewhere else, just bring your passbook with you
and we'll have the funds transferred to First Federal. You'll find it
pays to do that.
We know what money is for.

FEDERAL

First Fecleral
Savings of Detroit

Main Office: 1001 Woodward Avenue,

Detroit, Michigan 48226, Phone: 965-1400

Branch offices throughout the Detroit Metropolitan Area.

try's internal affairs.
-
The Jewish community
maintains ties to the
Memorial Foundation for
Jewish Culture, which
includes 48 national and
international Jewish cul-
tural and religious or-
ganizations, and partici-
pates in meetings of the
European Council for
Jewish Community Ser-
vices. In 1977, it sent de-
legates to the World
Jewish Congress in
Washington.
Jewish research and pub-
lishing, including the
ever-growing "Monumenta
Hungariae Judaica" (his-
torical documents) are
flourishing and the gov-
ernment has permitted the
release of fiction on the
Holocaust, on Jewish iden-
tity, even a history of anti-
Semitism in Hungary. The
state recording company,
Hungaroton, has issued its
first Jewish disc, "Hebrew
Melodies for Sabbath and
High Holy Days," sung by a
Jewish youth choir.
At the same time, it is dif-
ficult to impart Jewish trad-
ition and culture to the
young. The government
still defines Judaism solely
as a religious faith, and
rabbis cannot discuss
Zionism, Israel, or other
political themes, and there
are restrictions on Hebrew
rteo xtbooks
ad
coming from ab-

Only youth clubs al;
filiated with Communist
Party or state organizations
are permitted; young Jews
are discouraged from con-
gregating for social or cul-
tural activities, even at the
synagogue or yeshiva. For a
small community seeking
ways to transmit its herit-
age, the ban on such prog-
ramming is a grave obsta-
cle.
Nevertheless, whether
it was to look good during
the Helsinki meetings in
Belgrade, to expedite the
return of St. Stephen's
crown, or to increase her
chances for "most fa-
vored nation" status in
trade with the U.S. Hun-
gary has relaxed a
number of restrictions on
-eligion.
Last September, the
Catholic Theological Semi-
nary was permitted to offer
extension courses and ex-
pand its accommodations
for spiritual retreat. Later,
evangelist Billy Graham
was encouraged to make a
highly publicized tour of the
country.
Hungary's Jews may be
able to press the Helsinki
spirit to achieve similar
gains if their leaders in the
country and abroad explore
the possibilities and act
creatively translate them
into reality.

Producers Low

JERUSALEM (ZINS) —
Only 340,000 workers out of
Israel's 1,130,000 work
force are engaged in indus-
try and agriculture accord-
ing to a survey by the news-
paper
Haaretz. Some
770,000 are in "service" re-
lated jobs: ' ' . •

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