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December 16, 1977 - Image 35

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1977-12-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS Friday, December 16, 1977 35

Enriching Library of Paperbacks Includes Many Jewish Classics

Books on Jewish themes reissued titles is Leo Ros-
that have been popular sell- ten's "Treasury of Jewish
ers in hard cover volumes Quotations – (Bantam
appear in the new list of Books).
recently published paper-
"Reform Judaism
backs.
Today—What We Believe"
Noteworthy among the by Dr. Eugene B. Borowitz

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(Behrman House) has
gained recognition as a
guide for students of reli-
gion in all ranks of Judaism.
"The Jewish Connection"
by M. Hirsh Goldberg (Ban-
tam Books) fascinatingly
outlines many accom-
plishments by Jews, and
their contributions to sci-
ence and the arts.
"The Heart Is Half a
Prophet" by Ruth Tessler
Goldstein (Bantam Books)
is a deeply moving narra-
tive motivated by revealing
Jewish experiences.
An especially timely pa-
perback is "Muhammad—
The Messenger of God" by
Betty Kelen (Simon and
Schuster Pocket Books). It
is a revealing work which
deals extensively with the
Islamic relations with Jews,
the friendly eras and those
of persecution.
"The Tripoli Documents"
by Henry Kane (Simon and
Schuster Pocket Books) is
an exciting mystery story
about the Middle East, Jews
and Arabs.
Other absorbing paper-
backs include: "Looking for
Mr. Goodbar" by Judith
Rossner (Simon and Schus-
ter) ; "Why Me" by Rose
Kushner (New American. Li-
brary), a volume of great
significance in relation to
the story of the research
processes in the treatment
of cancer; "Hiding" by Nor-
ma Klein (Simon and Schus-
ter), an absorbing novel
dealing with youth-parent
conflicts.
Rosten's "Treasury of
Quotations" has few rivals
in popularity. Replete with
excerpts from the Talmud,

Yiddish and Hebraic lore, it
has served as a guide for
public speakers, as an in-
spiration in the home and as
most entertaining reading.
"The Jewish Connection"
is, in a sense, also sort of a
treasury of Jewish informa-
tion. It is a compendium of
many unusual facts about
Jews and Judaism.
Goldberg's book, well
documented, contains re-
vealing data about Jewish
inventors, like the creators
of the dirigible and the tele-
phone, Jews high up in pub-
lic life and many other de-
tailed facts about the
creativity of Jews in many
lands.

Dr. Borowitz's "Reform

Judaism Today" is part of a
trilogy that defines Reform,
traces its history and appli-
es the most vibrant of the
current developments in the
movement that is strength-
ening identity by Jews to
God and Torah. Even if it
were not intended to serve
as a textbook, Dr. Borow-
itz's scholarly approach to
Reform commends itself at
once to all elements as a
vital guidebook to an under-
standing of the Reform val-
ues as enunciated at pre-
sent.
The Bantam paperback of
Miss Goldstein's "The
Heart Is Half a Prophet" is
a powerful novel about the
conflicts between faithful
and skeptical in a Jewish
family divided by many
conflicts.
The story is told through
the eyes of the youngest in
the family, 11-year-old Es-
ther, a bright, imaginative
and serious young girl

Judaic Awareness Seminars Planned

NEW YORK—Bringing
the vibrancy and joy of tra-
ditional Jewish life to Jew-
ish teenagers around the
world is the driving motiva-
tion behind Counterpoint, or
Torah Leadership Seminar,
of the Rabbi Isaac Elchanan
Theological Seminary.
This winter, Seminar's
22nd, volunteers consisting
of Yeshiva College, Stern
College for Women, and
RIETS students, faculty,
and recent alumni will head
for the Lido Beach Hotel in
Lido Beach, N.Y. (Dec. 22-
27), to Camp Edphy in Ville
St. Morin, Quebec (Dec. 29-
Jan. 2) to Camp Hess Kra-
mer in Malibu, Calif., (Dec.
22-28) and to Panama City
and to Bogota, Colombia, to
once again reach out and
share their knowledge of
and feeling for Jewish tradi-
tions with local young
people.

At each of these events,
students whose Jewish edu-
cation ranges from nil to
middle range meet in
groups with youthful staff
members who possess
stronger backgrounds, in an
informal setting for in-
tensive discussions, reflec-
tion, song and fun within the
context of traditional Jew-
ish lift

tragic, anonymous fate.
Esther, the heart of the
family, is a sensitive and
perceptive observer of the
problems taking shape
around her. She remains the
only one in the family for
which there is hope, as she
struggles to reconcile the
disparities of her life and
grow in a way that neither
her sister nor her brother
could.

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College Names
Faculty Head

PHILADELPHIA—Dr.
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appointed chairman of the
faculty of the Reconstruc-
tionist Rabbinical College.
Brauner has been associ-
ated with the college since
1972,- as director -of the Rab-

trembling on the brink of
adolescence in a world
where the Orthodox Jewish
culture and the free lifestyle
of America have collided.
The cultural conflicts
have also found their way
into Esther's own family.
Her father, Zalman Hirsch,
impoverished caretaker of a
poor synagogue, is so fer-
vently devoted to God that
he is blind to the rifts his
over-zealousness is causing
within his family. Malka,
Esther's mother, skeptical
of both God and man, long
ago lost her love for her
husband and devotes herself
to the protection of her only
son.
Esther's older sister,
Leah, who calls herself Lila,
rebelliously yearns to be
free of the cultural and mor-
al restraints of her inflex-
ibly pious parents. And her
older brother, Benjamin, is
even more affected by the
widening rift between the
Old World values and those
of the new. Secretly relin-
quishing his father's reli-
gion and its observances,
Benjamin eventually flees
from the household to a

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