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December 09, 1977 - Image 24

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1977-12-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

24 Friday, December 9, 1977 THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Israeli Journalists Receive Warm Welcome e in Egypt

TEL AVIV (JTA)—Israeli
journalists have begun re-
porting and broadcasting
from Cairo and with diplo-
matic developments mark-

r

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ing time before the Cairo
conference opens, the main
news is about the warm
welcome they received
from Egyptian officials and
from Cairenes in general
and the small Jewish com-
munity in particular.
David Landau of the Jew-
ish Telegraphic Agency is
expected to head the JTS's
delegation of European and

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Israeli correspondents in
Cairo.
The first Israeli news-
paper correspondent to
work in Egypt was Mrs.
Tullia Zevi, the Rome corre-
spondent for Israel's He-
brew-language afternoon
paper, Maariv. The Egyp-
tian government granted
her formal, temporary ac-
creditation.
There are at least a half
dozen Israeli correspond-
ents in the Egyptian capital
and more arrive each day.
Most of them entered Egypt
with non-Israeli passports.
These include Ada Luciano
of Rome and Tamar Golan
of Paris, who were sent by
Maariv, Hans Knopp of Am-
sterdam and Eliezer
Strauch who are covering
for Yediot Ahronot, and Ben
Ami, another Yediot man
from Israel who made his
first broadcast from Cairo
Friday over Israel's armed
forces radio station.
The biggest stir was cre-
ated by Sami Greenspan of
Yediot Ahronot, who was
the first Israeli reporter to
land at Cairo Airport with
an Israeli passport. He ar-
rived last week via Rome
without an entry visa. He
was kissed on both cheeks
by the -Egyptian passport
control officer and given
permission for a week's
stay in the country.
Greenspan attended Sat-
urday morning services at
Cairo's Great Synagogue.
The congregants, mostly
people in their 70's, were
overcome by emotion. They
kissed his Israeli passport
with tears in their eyes and
offered prayers for the

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safety of Israel, the well
being of the visiting journal-
ists and for peace.
Greenspan is traveling
around Cairo with an Egyp-
tian bodyguard and an offi-
cial car and driver provided
by the Ministry of Informa-
tion. He was told that since
his arrival he received so
much publicity, "we have to
protect you from subversive
elements."
So far, the only protection
needed seems to be from
souvenir hunters. Anything
of Israeli origin is suddenly
in great demand in Cairo.
Israel-made cigarettes and
Israeli coins are the most
desired items. Israeli jour-
nalists draw crowds wher-
ever they are recognized,
but it is a friendly curiosity.
Knopp reported a chance
meeting with an Egyptian
general at an airline office.
The general asked him to
convey regards to Israeli
Defense Minister Ezer
Weizman who he said he
regarded as one of the best
air force officers in the
world. Weizman formerly
commanded Israel's Air
Force.
With the Cairo conference
now scheduled to open at
the middle of the month, the
Israeli news media, includ-
ing the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency, have applied for
permission to send corre-
spondents to Egypt. The
Cairo weekly Akbar El Yom
reported that Israel has
asked Egypt to admit 200
journalists to cover the
talks. The paper did not say
how and where the request
was made. It reported that
there were also requests
from 400 American journal-
ists.
Meanwhile, Foreign Min-
ister Moshe Dayan told the
Cabinet that the arrival in
Cairo this weekend of two
Israeli television journalists
on Israeli passports had em-
barrassed and upset the
Egyptian authorities, this
despite the warm and
friendly welcome the two
men have received there.
He said the embarrass-
ment was caused in Cairo
by the arrival of Ehud
Yaari, Arab affairs expert,
and Alex Giladi, foreign
news broadcast director, be-
cause the Egyptians viewed
the two men, employes of a
state corporation, as quasi-
civil servants.
As such, Dayan added,
they should not have taken
such politically significant
action without first con-
sulting with his ministry.
The two apparently re-
ceived permits from the In-
terior Ministry (without
which their mission is tech-
nically a criminal offense).
The ministry now says the
permits were issued in
error and no more will be
forthcoming until the
official delegation leaves
next week.
Other officials in Israel
said they believed the em-
barrassment was at least in

part responsible for the
very severe limitation that
the Egyptians were now
proposing to impose on Is-
raeli press coverage of the
conference. Egypt indicated
it would allow only 30 Is-
raeli journalists to cover the
conference. This figure in-
cludes television technicians
and radio soundmen and has
been received with great
disappointment in Israel.
Officials here are still hope-
ful it may not be Cairo's last
word.
Yaari has already phoned
back stories of his warm
welcome from officials in
Cairo and from ordinary
people who here he is from
Israel. Giladi is, meanwhile,
conferring with Egyptian
television personnel on ar-
rangements for covering the
conference.
The first Egyptian official
to be interviewed on Israeli
television in a broadcast
from Cairo expressed op-
timism that the Cairo
conference will produce
concrete results that could
lead to negotiations at a
higher level.
Dr. gorsi Sa'ad a Din,
director of the Egyptian
Government Information
Service, acknowledged that
the Israeli and Egyptian po-
sitions are far apart; but, he
said, "once you overcome
the lack of faith you can

,

also reach an agreement."
A Din was interviewed by
Yaari on the 9 p.m. news.
He predicted that the Cairo
conference would last for at
least 10 days and possibly
longer. He said the negotia-
tions would not be easy.

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