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July 30, 1976 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1976-07-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Tough Sadat Talk Worries Israel

JERUSALEM (JTA) —
There is some concern in
Jerusalem at the content of
a major speech to the Egyp-
tian Parliament by Presi-
dent Anwar Sadat last
week.
Israeli analysts point to a
tougher line taken by Sadat
vis-a-vis Israel and the
United States and —

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Havura'

JERSEY CITY (JTA) —
Young professionals have
created a residential havura
in an historic landmark
bank building here. The 13
families will enjoy their ar-
chitecturally unique condo-
minium units and will share
their Jewish traditions in
the building's community
spaces. According to Jeff
Oboler, director of the
American Jewish Congress
Youth Commission head-
quartered in Manhattan.
"Small intimate groups
known as havurot, the He-
brew word for friendship
and fellowship, are develop-
ing throughout the country.
A havura is simply a corn-
munity of individuals striv7
ing to attain a shared hu-
man consciousness through
common activities.

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equally worrisome — a very
broad hint thrown out by
the Egyptian leader to Mos-
cow.
Sadat said Cairo would be
ready to "rebuild its
bridges" with Moscow if the
Soviets honored their
pledges of aid to the Arab
states and if they ceased
supporting Arab radical
states against Egypt. This is
the first time since the in-
terim Sinai agreement last
September, observers here
note, that Sadat has allowed
a more positive tone on the
Soviets to creep into a public
address.

,

He flayed at the Ameri-
cans for slowing the pace

of Mideast peace-making
and cited them, by impli-
cation, as Syria's allies in
hounding the Palestine
Liberation Organization
in Lebanon. Sadat was
especially tough in his as-
sault on President Hafez
Assad of Syria over the Le-
banon issue — returning
in full measure Assad's
own strictures delivered in
an earlier speech.

The two speeches were
analyzed in depth by offi-
cials and army intelligence
men. The consensus, accord-
ing to informed sources,
was that the Sadat address
presages no immediate
threat of a change in policy.

Religious Olim Unhindered


JERUSALEM (JTA) —
The social-absorption of reli-
gious immigrants in Israel
is much smoother and eas-
ier than that of the non-reli-
gious, says Rabbi Mordechai
Kirschblum, associate head
of the Jewish Agency-World
Zionist Organization Immi-
gration and Absorption De-
partment.
The reason, he says, is not
that better services and fa-
cilities are provided for reli-
gious olim than for others.
It is that the religious -leh
naturally enjoys better com-
munication and relatively
closer connections with vet-
eran religious Israelis,
mainly through frequent
and regular meetings at the
synagogues.
Within days of his arrival
in Israel, the religious im-
migrant is out and about
looking for a suitable syn-
agogue. At the synagogue,
Israelis and newcomers
share the same experience,
find a common language,
and thus grow instantly
closer to each other.

The Immigration and

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Absorption Department
has always flatly rejected
proposals for setting up
special absorption centers
for religious olim, says
Kirschblum. The depart-
ment believes that the reli-
gious Jew, whether new-
corner or veteran Israeli,
does not need a special
framework of exclusivity
to satisfy his spiritual and
ritual requirements.

What the religious Jew
-l
oes need is suitable and ad-
equate physical facilities to
enable him to practice and
enjoy his faith. Often, such
physical facilities are sadly
lacking. But Kirschblum's
department, the rabbi says
sadly, has no real influence
on the religious facilities
provided by the governmen-
tal or municipal authorities
in the suburbs where the
olim eventually settle.
While the department
does not develop special
programs to cater to reli-
gious immigrants, it does
devote a great deal of effort
to providing religious facili-
ties for non-religious new-
comers.
The department's reli-
gious culture section is con-
stantly putting up religious
facilities in absorption cen-
ters. The section encourages
religious events, such as dis-
cussion groups, or Sabbath
and festival celebrations.
Lecturers are sent out by
the center to talk to immi-
grants on religious themes.

Each of the absorption
centers has a synagogue,
and almost every Saturday
there are "oneg Shabat"
and "Melave Malka" pro-
grams. The Israeli reli-
gious women's organiza-
tions send packages to the
absorption centers on the
festivals.

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The religious culture sec-
tion issues multi-language
books, booklets and pam-
phlets dealing with religious
subjects. It also arranges
Bar Mitzva ceremonies for
young immigrants.
Kirschblum stresses that
these activities of the reli-
gious culture section are
strictly voluntary; every
immigrant decides for him-
self whether to join in, and
no one is forced to do so. But
the impressive and constant
presence of religious activ-
ity at the absorption centers
and at the immigrant hous-
ing areas does seem to have
its impact.

Friday, July 30, 1976 19

Israel Universities Record Enrollment Increase

RAMAT-GAN — Enroll-
ment in Israel's universities
has increased five-fold in
the past 15 years, from 10,-
000 to 50,000 students, while
the population increased by
only 50 percent.
During this same period
university expenditures in
real terms increased by 600
percent compared with a
300 percent increase in the
gross national product.
These were some of the
figures released by Israel's
Minister of Education,
Aharon Yadlin, showing the
strides Israel has taken in
higher education. Yadlin
said these achievements
helped make Israel the only
country of any consequence
between Rome and Tokyo in
which independent scien-
tific and industrial research
was carried out on an inter-
national
so told his Bar-
Ilan audience that in 1960
the Israel government and
the Jewish Agency under-
wrote 45 percent of the univ-
ersities' budgets while today
they were contributing 78
percent. However, because
of the heavy burden on its
budget and resources, he
explained, the government
was forced to cut back its

Overland Bridge
Business Rises

HAIFA — Dispite the
fact that the Suez Canal re-
opened in June 1975, the
Kedem overland bridge
transported 38,000 tons of
cargo between the Fgr East
and East Africa and Europe
during the first six months
of the year, equaling the
1975 total. Kedem's 1975
gross revenue totalled $2.5
million.

contribution this year by 18 university continued to ex-
pand during the past
percent.
In order to cope with year, Bar-Ilan's Chancellor,
these cutbacks Yadlin Rabbi Joseph H. Lookstein,
called on Israel's universi- reported, reaching a total
ties to cut their expenses built-up area of some
and to raise more money 700,000 sq. ft., double the
from tuition fees and from built-up area available just
various outside sources.
five years ago. This entailed
Despite these economies, an expenditure of IL 40 mil-
which follow similar cut- lion ($5.5 million) during the
backs made last year, the past year.

Insurance Company to Stop
Discriminating Against Jews

NEW YORK — In what it
termed "a landmark agree-'
ment," the American Jew-
ish Committee announced
that the Pennsylvania Hu-
man Relations Commission
and the Provident Mutual
Life Insurance Co. in Phila-
delphia had agreed that the
insurance company would
"broaden the involvement of
Jews in the management of
the concern."
Under the agreement,
Provident Mutual Life
promised to take a number
of measures to end "exec-
utive suite discrimination,"
the Jewish service organiza-
tion said.

The insurance company,
without admitting any
violation of Pennsylvan-
ia's Human Relations Act,
agreed to notify all em-
ployees of the pact, adver-
tise on the media specifi-
cally directed toward the
Jewish community, among
other moves.

According to the AJCom-
mittee, which helped ini-
tiate the complaint against
the insurer, the agreement
was "to the best of our
knowledge the first case of
its kind in the country

where a human relations
commission has found a
pattern of exclusion with re-
gard to Jews existing in a
company and entered into
an affirmative action pro-
gram with that company to
remedy the situation."

Free 10th Grade
Education Limit

TEL AVIV — Compul-
sory 10th-grade education,
formerly free, will be avail-
able only to youths from
disadvantaged neighbor-
hoods according to Eliezer
Shmueli, acting director-
general of the Israel educa-
tion ministry. The state-
ment corrected a report
which said that compulsory
10th-grade education would
be cancelled altogether be-
cause of budget cuts.

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