100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

July 16, 1976 - Image 48

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1976-07-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.i.alatiftwErpretionwpw - NEwsommumumimenumummumwouposemosuur

f • -vr-vtirwitniaiivaxvi%, •-•

7 -5,4 ,-

,

Former UN Ambassador Daniel Patrick Moynihan
W arns of 'Ideological' Battles Endangering Israel

By DANIEL P. MOYNIHAN
(Excerpted from an address
before the annual Executive
Committee Meeting of the
United Jewish Appeal)

B y 19 7 2 , films were being
On April 29, in a debate
shown on Russian television of the Economic and Social that it said: "you've got to
of Hitler with Ben-Gurion's Council, the representa- get out of the occupied terri-
tories . . . you've got to re-
head superimposed.
tive of the PLO spoke of
As the campaign devel- the Pretoria-Tel Aviv settle the Palestinians . . .
In the United Nations, oped, we saw it in UNESCO
you've got to do this or
there are 47 members of the in 1974, with the first Axis, and explicit refer- you've got to do that." — No,
Islamic League which, if charges against the Israelis ence to the Axis between that anti-Zionist resolution
you add to 17 Communist of committing crimes Nazi Germany and Fascist said Israel does not have a
Italy in the 1930s and early right to exist!
countries, gives you almost against culture. That's the
1940s.
a working-majority in any first time it really appeared
In October, a distin-
On the 10th of May, in the guished British literary
General Assembly. The ef- outside the Soviet Union in
Security Council, the Soviet critic, Guronway Reese, ob-
fect of that majority has an international forum.
Union spoke of racial geno-
indeed begun to be felt —
And then, in 1975, the c ide carried out by Israel on served the debate at the
and it has been directed at proposition appeared that t
United Nations and wrote a
he occupied West Bank. column for the journal En-
Israel, one of the two de- "Zionism is a form of rac-
`Racial genocide." Where counter. This Welshman —
mocracies left on the main- ism."
id you first hear that not part of UJA, not an
land of Asia. Israel thus
You've got to think of
becomes a metaphor for the the Nazis parallel here. It p hrase?
American, totally outside
Recently, at a meeting of this event — wrote that:
democracies in the world at starts slowly, first with
t he Committee on the Exer-
large.
"There were ghosts
crimes against culture, c
This attack on Israel then with the assertion R ise of the Inalienable haunting the UN Third
ights of the Palestinian Committee — the ghosts of
comes at a time when her that Zionism is a form of
military strength has been racism. It next appeared P eople, a representative Hitler and Goebbels and
established in a series of at the Human Rights Com- s poke of the sealing of part Julius Streicher — grinning
four wars and 28 years of no mission in Geneva in Feb- v o f the city of Nablus as a with delight to hear not only
iolation of basic human Israel, but Jews as such,
peace. Since the military ruary of this year, which
strength of Israel has been adopted a position about r ights reminiscent of the denounced in language
proven, there has been a "war crimes" committed g hettoes and concentration
which would have provoked
shift in the attack upon Is- by Israel in the occupied ca mps of Nazi Europe.
hysterical applause at any
This is an outrageous Nuremberg rally and justi-
rael consonant and coordi- territories.
th ing. Of all the things that
nated with a perception of
I will read you some y ou might ever have thought fied a special edition of Der
Stuermer.
the declining position of lib- phrases from the UN Hu- th
eral democracy throughout man Rights Commission, b at the Jews might have
"And there were other
een charged with, surely
the world.
and ask where you first en- y ou would never have ghosts also at the debate,"
This current attack upon countered this kind of rheto- th
Reese wrote in Encounter,
liberal democracy, which ric: be ought they would have
"the ghosts of the six mil-
en charged with being lion dead in Dachau and
has been a sustained effort
"Annexation of parts of su ccessors to the Nazis.
of the totalitarian Marxists occupied territories . . . de-
Matthausen and the other
from the beginning of this struction and demolition k We must read Orwell to camps, listening to the
century, began in a two- . . . confiscation and appro- po now the extraordinary same voices which had
wer of the absolute inver- cheered and jeered and
piece article in "Pravda" in priation . . . evacuation
1971, propounding a thesis . . . deportation . . . expul- si on of truth. The incredible abused them as they made
po wer of that total inversion their way to the gas cham-
which is devastating and sion . . . displacement and of
reality gives it a claim to gers. For the fundamental
breathtaking in its daring.
transfer of inhabitants . . . cr
thesis advanced - by the
It says, simply, that the mass arrests . . . adminis- un edence by virtue of its
believability.
Jews, far from once hav-
supporters of the resolu-
trative detention and ill-
And I am telling you
ing been victims of the treatment . . . pillaging of
tion, and approved by a
th at it is being believed in majority of the Third Com-
Nazis, are successors to
archeological
and
cultural
th is country. The symbols mittee, was that to be a
the Nazis.
property . . . interference
I have spoken to a number with religious freedom . . . of progress, the symbols of Jew, and to be proud of it,
rightousness, are being and to be determined to
of experts in this area, and affront to human beings."
seized by the other side,
none seems to be satisfied
I ask you, where did you the anti-democratic side, preserve the right to be a
with his understanding of first hear that language, "
Jew, was to be an enemy of
and Israel is coming to be
the origins of the campaign,
. . . of ex-appropriation, a nation whose right to the human race.
but all agree that the cam- confiscation, evacuation"?
"After the defeat of Na-
paign began with the series You heard them in the Nu- exist is under question.
tional Socialism, which cost
The point about the anti- the world millions of lives,
in Pravda.
remberg Verdicts.
Zionist resolution was not and the horrors of the Final

Arab Buyers Gobbling Up British Property

By MAURICE
SAMUELSON

(Copyright 1976, JTA, Inc.)

LONDON — A cartoon in
the Daily Express recently
showed an Arab sheikh,
fresh from buying the
Dorchester Hotel, getting
ready to bid for Buck-
ingham Palace, the home of
the Queen. The message was
typical of the reaction here
to the hotel's purchase by an
Arab business consortium
for 9.5 million pounds ster-
ling. One of the waiters at
the hotel exclaimed:
"Blimey, they'll be taking
over the world."
The Dorchester is, in fact,
only the latest in a series of
large property purchases by
Middle East oil interests. It
is by no means the biggest.
The Kuwaitis paid 90 mil-
lion pounds for Saint Mar-
tin's Property Co. whose
portfolio includes Tintagel
House, headquarters of the
London Police Force. Abu
Dhabi paid 36 million
pounds for a 44 percent
stake in the Commercial
Union Tower block in Lon-
don.

.

O

Rich Arabs have also been
buying very expensive
homes. Mohammed Mandi
Al-Tajer, ambassador of the
United Arab Emirates, paid
500,000 pounds for a large
country castle, in addition
to his string of homes in
London. One of the richest
men in the world, his for-
tune is put at more than 2
billion pounds. Al-Tajer was
one of the powers behind
the. World Festival of Islam,
staged on a nation-wide
scale this summer.

There are many other
signs of the Arab presence
in London. Many Arabs
come for medical treat-
ment at the 90-pound-a-
day Wellington Hospital,
Britain's newest private
hospital. One wounded
Omani soldier has been
there for more than a year
and the bill for his treat-
ment is expected to reach
100,000 pounds.

The hospital is on the
edge of Regent's Park where
a more recognizable symbol
of Arab influence is taking

shape. The London Central
Mosque will open next
March with room for 3,000
worshippers. The biggest
house of Moslem prayer in
Europe, its final cost is ex-
pected to be three million
pounds. There are more
than 100,000 wealthy Arab
visitors to London every
summer.
These, however, are only
the external aspects of Arab
financial investment in Brit-
ain, which one leading busi-
nessman estimated a few
months ago at 3 billion
pounds sterling on long-
term deposit. It was first
felt here in the immediate
aftermath of the Yom Kip-
pur War when the price of
oil was quadrupled. Within
a year of the war, London
was said to have attracted 6
billion pounds sterling on
short-term deposit, ena-
bling the British economy to
remain solvent at a very dif-
ficult time.
In fact, Arab investment
has turned out to be far less
extensive than was pre-
dicted immediately after

the Yom Kippur War. At
that time, the press was
busy calculating how many
days' oil royalties would be
needed for the Arabs to buy
the principal British indus-
tries outright. These predic-
tions have not materialized.
Only Kuwait appears to
have embarked on a deli-
berate investment pro-
gram in Britain as a long-
term hedge against the
depletion of its oil re-
sources. Through its spe-
cial investment office in
London, Kuwait has sunk
many hundreds of millions
of pounds in hundreds of
companies. But they
rarely take more than a 10
percent stake in any one.
Among Arabs, too, there
are different views about
buying up hotels. A Saudi
Arabian promoter was
quoted as saying Arab
money would be much bet-
ter invested fruitfully in the
Arab countries. But 'the
Saudis themselves often
have strange ideas about
what constitutes construc-
tive investment.

Solution, one would have
thought that such voices
would have been silenced
forever, at least in any so-
ciety which even half-pre-
tended to be civilized. The
truth is otherwise.
"Today, the authentic
voice of anti-Semitism —
strengthened and invigo-
rated by the riches and
hatreds of the oil-producing
nations — is once again re-
spectable.
"It speaks in the best so-
ciety, and nowhere more
blatantly or stridently than
in the General Assembly of
the United Nations." That's
what this Welsh observer
thought of that resolution.
We must realize that the
campaign is working. It is
succeeding. The doubts
have risen in peoples'
minds. The symbols of
progress and righteous-
ness have been increas-
ingly and successfully cap-

tured by the other si
Israel can never be de
feated on the battlefield,
but it can be defeated o
the ideological front, an
it is being defeated in th
UN, day after day, week
after week.
The United States knows,
and Israel knows — but
other people disappear.
With any luck, we mustc
ten or eleven votes at most
in the United Nations.
Where are our allies?
Where are the den'
of the world? Don''
ee
that we are all tc4;s t,._ _ in
this, and that Israel has be-
come a metaphor for democ-
racy?
This is the issue ahead 6-,
us. It is a challenge to analy-
sis and intellect which
think we have not met in our
time, and about which I am
not, in fact, very confident.
But we will not give up —
we will not stop fighting.

DANIEL P. MOYNIHAN

Israel's Theaters in Trouble

By MOSHE RON

Jewish News Special
Israel Correspondent

JERUSALEM — Israel
has many vital problems but
one cannot be indifferent to
those regarding cultural
life.
The Hebrew theaters are
now passing a crisis in spite
of support of millions of
Pounds. The National Thea-
ter "Habima" is in the worst
state. Art Director Shimon
Finkel resigned. Jossi Yis-
raeli, who replaced him, had
good intentions but went too
far. He came back from the
U.S. with wide theatrical
knowledge, but did not take
into account the realities in
Israel.
Yisraeli had great
plans. He chose thtee per-
formances to be shown at
the same time in one eve-
ning in three halls, and the
theater suffered heavy
loses.
The former general man-
ager of Habima, Gabriel
Zifroni, who succeeded in
completing the new building
of the theater, did not agree
with Yisraeli and resigned.

In the meantime, Minister
for Education and Culture
Abram Yadlin reduced the
financial support for all
Hebrew theaters and cul-
tural institutions. Habima
will have to close its two
smaller theaters and will
continue only with the big
hall.
Yisraeli also introduced
some performances from
the classic Jewish reper-
toire. If he had performed'i
them in the traditional Jew-
ish style he would ce,rf-' -q-y
have scored successes
But Yisraeli turned
use
performances into n
circus-shows. Israel'S cul-
tural life suffers from two
things: a tendency to break
with the past and no respect
for the old cultural values.
The Israeli government, ,
which has lavishly sup- c,
ported the Hebrew thea-
ters, has deserved better
art performances.
Former art director of
Habima, Shimon Finkel,
published a booklet about
his experiences in the Na-
tional Theater. He blames
Yisraeli for blunders.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan