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April 02, 1976 - Image 31

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1976-04-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

April 2, 1976 31

Dawidowicz 'Holocaust Reader' a Follow-Up

BY ALLEN A. WARSEN

Lucy S. Dawidowicz, the
historian of the Holocaust,
has produced a companion
book to "The War Against
the Jews 1933-1945" titled
"A Holocaust Reader"
(Behrman House, Inc., New
York, 1976).
The "Reader" consists of
documents the author col-
lected, analyzed and inter-
preted.
In the introduction the
author explains the types
and diversity of the official
German and Jewish docu-
ments.
The official documents,
among others, include the
so-called "Blue," "Red"
and "Green Series." The
blue series are documents
which were "admitted in
evidence" at the Nurem-
berg trial. The red series,
published by the U.S.,
were not admitted in evi-
dence at the trial. The
green series consist of se-
lected documents.
The best known Jewish
records were written and
collected by the historian
Emanuel Ringelblum
(1900-1944).
Known as "Oneg Shabat,"
their purpose was "to docu-
ment Jewish experiences
under the German occupa-
tion and to preserve a record
of the cataclysmic transfor-
mations which the whole
Jewish settlement in Poland
was undergoing."
Many of the documents,

LUCY DAWIDOWICZ

Prof. Dawidowicz explains,
were written in "Aesopian
language." A good example
is the statement "Mo-yes
(death) visited us" which ap-
pears in a report of the
Bund.
In addition to words,
phrases and entire pas-
sages which may be under-
stood in two senses,
"Nearly all private writ-
ers resorted to cryptic
phrases, allusions, and
tricks of rhetoric —
aposiopesis, peri-
phrasis — that conceal
meaning."
Needless to say that such
documents present enor-
mous problems for the his-
torian. Similarly the Holo-
caust myths present
difficulties for the re-
searcher. "The most wide-
spread such story is proba-
bly that of the 93 (more or

Columnist Questions
U.S.-Egypt Arms Deals

WASHINGTON — Na-
tionally syndicated column-
ist Crosby S. Noyes, in an
article which appeared in a
recent issue of The Detroit
News, stated that the U.S.
might make "a far greater
contribution to the peace of
the Middle East in thoform
of economic aid" for Egypt,
rather than military aid.
Noyes wrote that Egyp-
tian President Anwar el-
Sadat, in cutting his ties
with Russia, predictably is
looking for the U.S. to be-
come his new arms supplier.
Noyes says it is clear that
Sadat will get his weapons,
but he adds they do not have
to come from the U.S.
"To begin with, there is
the scale of the effort. To
completely re-equip an
army of 332,500 men — in-
cluding 450 warplanes, 2,000
tanks and some 1,700 pieces
of long-range artillery —
will take many years and
many billions of dollars.
The notion that such an
undertaking would cement
American-Egyptian rela-
tions and make for greater
stability in the Mideast as
a whole is open to consid-
erable doubt."
Noyes continues, "What
actually would happen in
the event of war between
Egypt and Israel, if the
United States were the prin-

Solomon Schechter. great
Conservative rabbi and
scholar, headed the Jewish
Theological Seminary.

less) devout girls of a Beth
Jacob school in the Cracow
ghetto who chose mass sui-
cide over the degradation of
a German brothel. It is a
fanciful and moving tale of
sacrificial piety, a lesson in
religious morality, fash-
ioned by people who knew
nothing of the Nuremberg
laws which made sexual re-
lations between Germans
and Jews illegal, and subject
to severe punishment."
Prof. Dawidowicz de-
serves credit for including in
the "Reader" documents
covering every phase of
ghetto life and activity, such
as health care, food distri-
bution, cultural functions,
clandestine politics, the
work of the "Judenrate"
(Councils of Jewish Elders),
and others.
Almost all of the ghetto
documents are records of
pain and suffering. For
instance, "January 1942
was the hardest month for
the refugees generally and

especially for the residents
of the locale at Dzika and
Niska Streets. There is no
misfortune and illness

which they did not experi- Jews 1933-1945" and "A
ence in the time they have Holocaust Reader" together
form the authoritative his-
spent in Warsaw."
"The War Against the tory of the Holocaust

5 lbs. of MATZO

If I can't Beat Your Best Deal

'ARNOLD MARGOLIS

Margolis Household Furniture
30 YEARS at the Same
OLD STAND 6 Mile, 1 81k. W. of Schaefer
SHARPENING the PENCIL

On All Name Brands

Furniture and Bedding

• SCHOOLFIELD •SELIG •SIMMONS •SEALY •SERTA •SPRING AIR •LA-Z-
BOY •STIFFEL LAMPS •KROEHLER •AMERICAN •BURLINGTON • BASSETT
• BARCALOUNGER •LANE •UNIQUE

Hrs. Mon thru Sat. 9:30 til 5:30

First Preview Performance To The World Premiere .. .

THE BETH ABRAHAM YOUTH CHORALE

of Dayton, Ohio Sings

"THE DAYS OF AWE"

SPECIAL MATINEE!

ONE PERFORMANCE ONLY

2:30 p.m.

SUNDAY, APRIL 25th

Cong. Sharey Zedek

NOYES

cipal arms supplier to both
sides, boggles the imagina-
tion. It is hard to conceive of
simultaneous emergency re-
supply airlifts to Cairo and
Jerusalem being mounted.
"It is equally hard to con-
ceive of the United States
putting itself in the position
of an arbitrator in a mortal
conflict on the basis of
which side may be judged at
the time to have been the
`aggressor.' "

HIAS Lists 1975
Immigration Total

NEW YORK — The 1975
year-end report by HIAS
shows that the organization
aided 5,387 Eastern Euro-
peans (the vast majority
from Russia) in settling in
the United States during
1975.
The group also assisted
3,522 Indochinese in settling
in this country.
The totals include 275
immigrants who settled in
Michigan. Two immigrants
settled in Ann Arbor, three
in Berrien, 247 in Detroit,
five in Fenton, 13 in Flint,
and five in Grand Rapids.

"The Beth Abraham Youth Chorale"

75 Golden Voices!

CANTOR JEROME B. KOPMAR — FOUNDER DIRECTOR
"THE DAYS OF AWE"—DR. SHOLOM KALIB—High Holyday Musical Service

CANTOR JACOB BARKIN, Soloist
INSTRUMENTAL ENSEMBLE

PROCEEDS TO SCHOLARSHIP FUND OF THE CANTORS ASSEMBLY

TICKETS OF ADMISSION

STUDENT SPECIAL $2.00

RESERVED: $4.00-$3:00

Congregation Shaarey Zedek,

27375 Bell Road,
Southfield, Mich. 48076
Telephone 357-5544
Office hours 9-5 Please.

Mail and Telephone Orders Accepted
Checks Payable:

"CANTORS ASSEMBLY SCHOLARSHIP FUND"

SEATING WILL BE LIMITED TO THE SANCTUARY ONLY.

CONCERT TO BE RECORDED LIVE!

1, 116

......

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