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May 09, 1975 - Image 41

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1975-05-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Dentist's 25-Year Struggle
on Trifa Nearing Conclusion

NEW YORK — With the
help.of a New York newspa-
per editor, Dr. Charles H.
Kremer is finally seeing his
25-year struggle to bring
Romanian war criminal
Bishop Valerian D. Trifa of
Grass Lake, Mich., to jus-
tice.
Dr. Kremer, a dentist,
whose battle to bring the
omanian Orthodox bishop
trial was chronicled in
c 'e American Jewish Com-
mittee's quarterly, Present
Tense, by author Peggy
Mann, got help in exposing
DR. CHARLES KREMER
the bishop from David Ho-
rowitz, editor of the United of Jews. Horowitz printed
Israel Bulletin.
the information he re-
Horowitz had been in ceived in his newspaper.
Israel and Romania where
Kremer received copies of
he learned of Trifa's par- the_newspaper from friends
ticipation in the Iron and upon seeing the Trifa
Guard, a Fascist body items, contacted Horowitz.
which murdered hundreds Since then, The New York
Times and other national
newspapers have picked up
JOE MILLER
on Trifa's activities, as well
and
as the Immigration and
HIS ORCHESTRA
Naturalization Service
-Music For All Occasions
which is planning to file suit
_asking for the biship's de-
LI 5-1244
portation.
41 ■ 10.1•11/
with this ad

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Abe Cherow, Says

WISH MY WIFE,
ETHEL, AND ALL
OTHER,BEAUTIFUL
AND WONDERFUL
MOTHERS A HAPPY
MOTHERS DAY.

L

Dearborn LU 4.5900

Open Doily 8 aim to 5 p m

ABE CHEROW, President

/0l. the LAR Plininatin9

Madz iff anc
Orcheihw
358-3642

Editor-in-Chief
Emeritus, JTA
(Copyright 1975, JTA, Inc.)

INSIDE UJA: Reaching the midway mark in its 1975
campaign, the United Jewish Appeal has now taken inven-
tory showing remarkable results. It established that despite
the economic difficulties in the country, UJA is this year 25
percent ahead in cash.
The figures also reveal a seven percent decline in
pledges. However, UJA leadership is proud of the fact that
cash collections are now higher than in any other year. It is
too early to speculate on the total amount the UJA may
raise before the campaign year is over.
Credit for the achievement in raising more cash in this
time of recession is given to the Jewish community. UJA
representatives traveling throughout the country repo'rt
that there is a strong feeling of anxiety among Jews in
many communities over the developments in and around Is-
rael. The further Jews live from larger centers, the greater
is their worry. They are troubled by the present climate in
Washington vis-a-vis Israel and the economic situation in
Israel.

They learn that the people in Israel have recently in-
creased their taxes, for the third time, by another $2 billion;
that they devalued their currency; lowered and relowered
their standard of living; changed their eating habits; as-
sumed compulsory and also voluntary loans; suspended
public construction; cut their basic human services. Many
express fear that Israel may reach the stage of social dis-
ruptions. Their impulse is therefore to give the maximum
through UJA for Israel.
* * *
EYES ON LEADERS: National UJA leaders make no
secret of the fact that they are not worried as much about
the givers as they are about the local heads of the cam-
paigns in a number of cities. They demand from local lead-
ers more aggressiveness in their. .accelerating and complet-
ing campaigns and in resoliciting of inadequate gifts.

SAILEtupTo

Innovative approaches to campaigning have been rec-
ommended and applied, especially during the total mobili-
zation which is now in progress for collecting $100 million
in cash by mid-May.
* * *
FEDERATION FIGURES: The Council of Jewish Fed-
erations and Welfare Funds has, like the UJA, also taken
stock of fund raising in the communities at this midway
mark of campaigning. The results reported by more than
100 federations and welfare funds of their general commu-
nity fund raising efforts are very encouraging. They show
that despite the economic depression, close to two-thirds of
major contributions to the Federations maintained or
creased their pledge lines.

There were also decreases. The 106 communities — in
which the federations raised over $295 million by April 1 —
have shown a decrease of 8.6 percent as compared with the
same mark in the peak 1974 campaign year. However, the
CJFWF analysis of major gifts.for 71 cities established that
62 percent of the $10,000 and over givers increased, or at
least held the line in their pledges. The number of gifts in
this category totaled 2,866 and accounted for about $90 mil-
lion in the communities covered. •
In general, the reporting communities with a popula-
tion of 40,000 Jews and over showed pledges totaling more
than $207 million on April 1. Communities with a popula-
tion between 15,000 and 40,000 registered a decrease of only
1.5 percent, while the decrease in larger communities was
higher. Increases came primarily from smaller communi-
ties. The results in general are considered a major accom-
plishment by the federations, inasmuch as they show that
the federations are holding fast to "peak plateaus" of giving
in the face of the present economic dislocations.

Murray Schneier, director
of the Atlantic City Federa-
tion of Jewish Agencies,

who helped coordinate the
merger, said the congrega-
tions recognize that "they
can no longer go it alone."
Dwindling school enroll-
ments have brought the to-
tal of students at the four
synagogue schools down to
210. A lack of adequately
qualified teachers in the
area was another factor
making the merger neces-
sary.

Day

AND MORE

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In some communities there is a noticeable feeling of
tiredness among the local UJA heads and this affects the
campaign in their localities. To stimulate greater action,
the national UJA has now scheduled special meetings in
more than 150. communities.

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J.
(JTA) — The midweek
schools of the four Atlantic
City area Conservative syn-
agogues have been merged
into a single Absecon Island
Religious School which will
begin operations in Septem-
ber.

5755 SCHAEFER RD.
(I block North of Fold Rd



A tilt

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u p
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p
an a
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Fresh spring
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4 Religious Schools Merge •in.N.J.

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Friday, May 9, 1975 41

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