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January 24, 1975 - Image 15

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1975-01-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS Friday, January 24, 197S-15

Sale Starts Tomorrow,
Saturday, January 25!

U.S.-Israel Relations Friendlier
After Allon Visit to Washington

WASHINGTON (JTA) —
Comments by President
Ford, Secretary of State
Henry A. Kissinger and Is-
raeli Foreign Minister Yigal
Allyn have lifted f or m al
Israel-U.S. relations, at least
publicly, to somewhere near
their normal friendliness
after having plunged to their
lowest point in 18 years.
In a parting statement to
t he media at the close of his
hews conference last Friday,
went out of his way to
olunteer his confidence that
\---2, `the American people will
never go Munich" and im-
plied that the American Jew-
ish community should remain
confident, too, in continuing
U.S. support.

U.S. M.E. Policy
I
Called 'Fallacious

NEW YORK (JTA)—Prof.
Hans J. Morgenthau warned
that the United States was
following a "fallacious" pol-
icy in the Middle East of
wooing the Arabs at Israel's
expense which could lead to
a new war.
The political scientist, who
is chairman of the National
Committee on American For-
eign Policy, said he supported
Secretary of State Henry A.
Kissinger's recent warning
that the U.S. would not rule
out force to secure Middle
East oil sources but said that
this in itself was an intima-
tion that Kissinger's policies
have failed.
Morgenthau said America's
alternative in the Middle
East is "to stand pat and
make Israel as strong as pos-
sible," even though that
course might lead to a new
Arab-Israeli war and a con-
frontation between the two
superpowers. But the Rabat
conference and Yasir Ara-
fat's United Nations speech
"have left no doubt that the
Arabs want Israel to dis-
appear."
Morgenthau and another
member of the National Com-
mittee, Prof. Uri Ranan of
the Fletcher School of Law
and Diplomacy at Tufts Uni-
versity, . agreed that the
American attempt to win the
Arabs away from the Soviet
Union has failed. Ranan ob-
served that "Egypt is totally
dependent on Soviet arms
and the U.S. cannot replace
it." He charged that the U.S.
was trying to "deliver terri-
tory" to the Arabs "to win
a Soviet client at the expense
of Israel."



el Aviv U. Gets
lazi Archives

TEL AVIV (JTA) — Tel
Aviv University has con-
firmed that it has been se-
lected to receive the Wiener
Archives, said to be the
world's largest collection of
material relating to Nazi
war crimes and the Holo-
caust.
The archives, established
in Amsterdam in 1934 by Dr.
Alfred Wiener, a Jewish or-
ientalist and community lead-
er, was transferred from Hol-
land in 1940 where it is
presently locate d. Under
terms of an agreement, it will
be shipped to Israel in 1980.

Noting his travels in the
United States last week for
the United Jewish Appeal,
Allon said that because of
the oil crisis and inflation "in
many places, people are wor-
ried that the United States
was going to deliver Israel
to the Arabs."
_ Ford appeared to make a
particular point of affection
for Israel when he mentioned
to Allen while they were
being photographed at the
White House that he would
like some day to see the
Knesset in Jerusalem. "That
will be a great day," Allon
replied fervently.
Kissinger himself de-
scribed the talks during Al-
lon's three-day stay as "very
friendly" and "very encour-
aging." Ford was reported
as saying he believed the
step-by-step negotiating pro-
cedures were a "viable
process."
Allon concluded three days
of talks with highest U.S. of-
ficials last Friday with per-
sonal notes of optimism over
the progress towards a Mid-
dle East settlement. "I am
leaving tne country with- a
good feeling," he told the
news conference.
"I have got the notion that
Egypt may be ready to start
talks on an interim agree-
ment. Israel is ready to com-
promise on territory in re-
turn for a sound agreement
that will help each side
equally. I leave Washington
today with the good feeling
that these talks may subse-
quently lead to the more de-
sirable phase of deciding the
procedures, place and time
for talks between ourselves
and Egypt."
Allon disclosed that Kis-
singer had accepted his in-
vitation to visit Israel as soon
as possible. State Depart-
ment sources said that Kis-
singer accepted "in princi-
ple" but no time has been
set and he would not go
there until he felt certain
that an agreement might be
worked out with Egypt, and
that he also would go at that
time to Egypt, Jordan, Syria
and Saudi Arabia.
Allon said that Kissinger's
visit "can serve as a turning
point from the preliminary
stage to the negotiating
stage," in current discus-
sions. Indicating both in his
attitude and in his words that
he was encouraged by his
talks with Ford, Vice Presi-
dent Nelson Rockefeller, Kis-
singer and Defense Secretary
James R. Schlesinger, Allon
said that ihis three days here
were "the most fruitful" - in
his year-old career as foreign
minister.
In Jerusalem, Premier Yit-
zhak Rabin reported to the
Cabinet that there is no au-
thoritative word from Egypt
on the nature of offers it is
willing to make in a second
stage agreement with Israel.
Summing up Foreign Minis-
ter Allon's talks in Washing-
ton last week, Rabin said
an interim agreement with
Egypt was possible.
He said that Allon brought
no new Israeli proposals to
Washington and that Israel
was now waiting for word
from Cairo.

THE GOLD
PLACE
SLASHES

20% OFF*

ITS REGULAR DISCOUNT PRICE ON
EVERY ITEM NOW ON HAND IN ITS

Complete Jewelry Stock

DURING AN EXTRAORDINARY

STOR•IVIDE
DISCOUNT SALE

Just imagine, during this sale you can save on everything in stock, including watches,
earrings, rings, bracelets, giftware, imported glassware, necklaces, pearls, diamonds
in 14K and 18K gold, sterling silver and gold-filled items by the most famous names.

• FAMOUS WATCHES • WEDGEWOOD • LORETT • HADLEY-KALBE • IMARI
• PEDRE
• ROYAL HOLLAND
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EXAMPLES OF TYPICAL GOLD PLACE SAVINGS:

REGULAR
PRICE

GOLD PLACE
EVERYDAY
DISCOUNT
PRICE

GOLD PLACE
20% OFF
SALE PRICE

$16.80
$29.60
$43.20

$35.00

Ladies Sterling Silver Fashion Ring

$21.00

$66.50

14K Star of David

$37.00

$97.00

14K Hoop Earrings

$54.00

$77.50

Waterford Crystal Ships Decanter

$54.00

$55.00

14K Open Heart Pendant

$42.50

$43.20
$34.00

$140.00

Ladies 14K Bangle Bracelet

$82.50

$66.00

$735.00

Ladies 14K Diamond & Tiger Eye Ring

$408.00

$326.40

Ladies 14K Diamond & Onyx Designers Ring

$900.00

$720.00

$1500.00

And remember, you receive 20% off our regular discount prices

which means that you actually buy at a very substantial

40% TO 65% OFF* REGULAR RETAIL PRICES
SUGGESTED BY THE MANUFACTURER!

This sale does not apply to special orders nor to watch and jewelry repair.

OPEN MONDAY-SATURDAY 9:30.5:00

P■ TOMEI OPEN SATURDAY

E



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VW 9:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

PLACE

North Park Plaza Tower, Room 120
17117 W. Nine Mile Road
Southfield, Michigan 48075
(313) 559-6140



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