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September 03, 1971 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1971-09-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Roles of Rubinow and Epsteinas 'Fathers of Social Security'

The enactment of the Social
Security Act in 1935 was primari-
ly through the pioneering efforts
of the "fathers of Social Security,"
Isaac Max Rubinow and Abraham
Epstein.
. Both were leaders in a genera-
tion-long debate over to the need
to provide pooled protection for
the indigent aged, for the unem-
ployed, the sick, the disabled, the
widow and the orphan.
Rubinow's and Epstein's involve-
ment with these problems was told
in a recent article in The Nation-
al Jewish Monthly.

Rubinow became involved with
the needs of the impoverished
during two years of medical
practice. Later, he switched to
economics, earning a doctorate
at Columbia University in 1914.
As a statistician with the U.S.
Labor Department for eight years,
Rubinow developed principles of
social insurance which influenced
the plank on old age, health and
unemployment adopted by Theo-
dore Roosevelt's Progressive
Party.
A year later, in 1913, Rubinow's
work "Social Insurance" became

the first English-language treatise
on the subject, and the standard
book in the field for nearly 15
years. His "The Quest for Secu-
rity" in 1934 greatly influenced
Franklin Delano Roosevelt's eco-
nomic policy.

The moving force behind the
enactment of Social Security was
Abraham Epstein, who had
early ambitions to be a social
reformer. He became director
of research for a Pennsylvania
commission on old age pensions

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GEORGE RUSKIN

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TEMPLE
ISRAEL

A CONGREGATION OF LIBERAL JUDAISM

17400 MANDERSON ROAD — 863-7769

Invites the Community

to Attend Its Midnight

Invites the Unaffiliated

SELICHOT SERVICE

to Communicate with Us Regarding
Information on Becomming a Member Family

An Inspiring, New Creative Service

Has Been Prepared by the Temple's

Creative Liturgy Committee

TEMPLE ISRAEL'S MEMBERSHIP FEES INCLUDE:

And Will Be Conducted by Our Rabbis

• Seating for every member of your family
at High Holy Day Services, which begin
with Rosh Hashana on Sunday Night, Sept. 19.



Rabbi Harold S. Loss
Assistant Rabbi

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Arranammingaggineminusam adiiramm

Through the reformist ideas of
Epstein and Rubinow's economic
research, the country was well-
prepared for Social Security when
it was implemented by Franklin
D. Roosevelt's administration.

fr

Free Estimates
Later amendments to the Social
Security Act, including Medicare,
were among those first champion-
in 1918.
ed by Rubinow and Epstein.

As executive secretary of the
state's Federation of La b o r,
Epstein waged a Social Security
campaign. He made a nation-wide
considerable virtues.
What the tourist is obliged to do study of the problems of old age,
is look beyond the brave front that and in 1921, drafted and saw fail
Israel puts up and learn what the first model old-age pension
really makes it tick. When he bill.
steps out of the tourist bus and
SO DOES
into a depressed neighborhood, he
Eye Doctors
may learn that Israel has far to go
Prescriptions Filled
in the area of social equality. It
may shock him out of a loyal, but
misguided, lethargy and into a
more realistic desire to work for
PRESCRIPTION OPTICAL CO.
26001 Coolidge
10 MILE & GREENFIELD
Israel's betterment.
543-3343

The Israel Few Tourists See

By CHARLOTTE DUBIN
JERUSALEM—From the window
of the air-conditioned bus, the tour-
ist looks upon an Israel of miracles
—forests where there were only
barren wastes, prosperous kibut-
zim and villages built with the grit
and sweat of pioneers from many
lands, new construction in the
cities that attests to prosperity.
Israel is a tourist's delight —
witness the packed hotels, kibutz
guest houses, boarding houses. An
evening stoller can barely negoti-
ate the Jaffa Rd. in downtown
Jerusalem, and the American stu-
dents crowd every felafel stand
and cafe between Haifa and Tel
Aviv.
But the more-than-casual ob-
server soon learns there are many
miracles yet to be wrought. The
ingathering of the exiles, as mag-
nificent an effort as it has been,
has yielded less than ideal results.
The Israeli press does not conceal
it: There is poverty, there is juv-
enile delinquency and crime, there
are class conflicts no less serious
than those in America.
The tourist marvels at the num-
ber of television antennas criss-
crossing the skylinc, , and the num-
ber of new cars scaring the living
daylights out of hapless pedestri-
ans. But the fact remains that
prices are high for the "middle-
income" Israeli trying to make
ends meet on a salary that he must
share with the defense ministry.
Like his Yankee brother, the Is-
raeli has learned to live on the
installment plan.
One fact the Israeli—particu-
larly the younger one—cannot
learn to live with is the dichot-
omy between his patriotic deSire
for new immigrants and his
growing dissatisfaction with the
special favors those immigrants
are getting at his expense. Why
should a young couple who have
served their country in the
army have to live in a substand-
ard dwelling while a newcomer
gets first crack at new apart-
ments? The guide points out the
tents on the lawn of the Beer-
sheba city hall; but he doesn't
tell of the anger and frustration
felt by the young couples en-
gaged in the housing sit-in.
The guide confides to question-
ing tourists that the Black Pan-
thers are simply a small group of
Moroccans who don't want to
work. He is not obliged to go fur-
ther into the issue; but how many
tourists will look further and find
out why disadvantaged youths are
quitting before they get to high
school? More than one nice Amer-
ican lady has asked, at the slight
of an Israeli jail, "Who do you put
in prison? There are no Israeli
criminals, are there?"
And it goes beyond that. What
happens to a loyal citizen who can
appreciate defense needs but who
is taxed so heavily that he cannot
manage without loopholes — "pro-
teksia" they call it? The tourist is
pleased that his American dollar
now trades at 4.20 Israeli pounds,
and he immediately spends it on a
meal in' a popular restaurant that
most Israelis can ill afford to pa-
tronize.
The job of the tourist guide is
to show Israel in its best light.
And why not? There are many
good lights in which to display her

Epstein also wrote books on
the subject. "Facing Old Age"
in 1922, and a primary source
book in the field, "Insecurity—
a Challenge," in 1933.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
8—Friday, September 3, 1971

A

Dr. M. Robert Syme
Senior Rabbi

Dr. Leon Fram
Founding Rabbi

With the Beautiful Melodies of the
Selichot Tradition Rendered by

I

Religious School enrollment for all the children
and youth of the family--a complete course
in Jewish studies beginning with Pre-
Kindergarten at age 4 and continuing tier otigh
Bar and Bat Mitzvah, Confirmation
Temple High School Graduation. School under
the direction of Cantor Arthur Asher.
- -



Youth Activities — a program of interesting,
sociable and wholesome activities for High
School age youth



A variety of programs for the entire family,
including lectures, concerts, social events.

CANTOR HAROLD

ORBACH

And the Temple Israel
Choir

FOR MEMBERSHIP INFORMATION,

WRITE, TELEPHONE OR SEE

Frank L. Simons, Administrator, 863-7769

Social Reunion at 10:30 P.M.
In the Leon Fram Social Hall

Service in the Sanctuary
from 1 1:00 P.M. to 12 Midnight

TEMPLE ISRAEL

tiaylsnA

Cbr>i

17400 MANDERSON ROAD AT MERTON

1 Block North of W. McNichols, / Block East of Pontchartrain Drive

FOR INFORMATION, CALL 863-7769

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