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December 18, 1970 - Image 41

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1970-12-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Anti-Israel, Pro-Arab Communist Policies
Exposed in Brian Crozier's 'Since Stalin'

Brian Crozier, in a penetrating
analysis of Communist power and
its aspects for the future, in "Since
Stalin: An Assessment of Commu-
nist Power," published by Coward-
McCann, views seriously the pos-
sibility of a Sino-Soviet alliance
with the death of Mao and does
not believe that anti-Communist
coups are possible in Russia and
China. He points to the "clear aim
of Soviet policy "to restore Mos-
cow's former absolute hold on the
international movement."
There is a warning against im-
pending continuing dangers in the
author's admonition:
"In a liberal context, anti-
communism does not in any

sense involve a witch-hunt or—
except in time of grave emerg-
ency—a reduction of normal
liberties. What it does call for is
readiness on Inc part of those
who want to defend a threaten-
ed way of life to take up the
challenge; to answer totalitarian
arguments; to counter totalitar-
ian tactics in factories anr uni-
versities. Above all, it call for a
sense of responsibility on the
part of those in executive posi-
tions especially in the world of
communications, and a discreet
readiness to reduce the power
of infiltrators to do their worst,
for instance, by providing a
platform for anti-totalitarians.

UAHC Raps Nixon on Scranton Report

NEW YORK (JTA)—The Union
of American Hebrew Congrega-
tions, the congregational body of
Reform Judaism, became a con-
stituent of the World Jewish Con-
gress in an action voted by its
National Board of Trustees.
The action was taken on the rec-
ommendation of Rabbi Maurice B.
Eisendrath, president of the UAHC,
in his semi-annual report. The in-
vitation for the UAHC to join the
WJC through membership in its
American section was extended by
Dr. Nahum Goldmann, president of
the World Jewish Congress.
Rabbi Eisendrath's report to
the board of trustees sharply
criticized President Nixon for re-
jecting the appeal of the Scran-
ton Commission on Campus Un-
rest, that he assume the moral
leadership needed to ease the
tensions of what the commission
termed "a nation on the edge of
chaos."
He noted that the UAHC was par-
ticipating "in every struggle on the
American scene for the achieve-
ment of greater unity, cooperation
and harmony" among Jewish
groups in this country and ob-
served that "today it is urgent to
increase cooperation and joint col-
laboration" on the world scene as
well.
Rabbi Eisendrath cited "the
situation in the Middle East, the

Concert Chairman
Honored by ZOD

Dr. Jack R. Greenberg (left),
chairman of the 38th annual
Balfour Concert, accepts a
plaque for distinguished service
from Dr. Joel I. Hamburger,
president of the Zionist Organi-
zation of Detroit. The presenta-
tion was made at a recent meet-
ing and panel discussion held
by the ZOD on "The Relevance
of Zionism to the American
Jew." Members of the panel
were Rabbis Milton Arm and
Moses Lehrman and Belnesh Ep-
stein, national consultant to the
public affairs department of the
Zionist Organization of Ameri-
ca. Louis Panush was modera-
tor. Dr. Greenberg presented
Epstein with a check for $10,-
000 for the ZOA's American
Zionist Fund, and a champagne
social hour followed, in celebra-
tion of the success of the re-
cently held Balfour Concert.
Walter Nussbaum was program
chairman.

ordeal of Soviet Jewry and the
fragile position of much of Latin
American Jewry" as areas de-
manding attention. He also urged
that "we enlarge and redouble our
work with young people," whom
he said are made "scapegoats and
political targets" by some elements
of American society.

People
Make News

ISAAC BASHEVIS SINGER, the
noted Yiddish fiction writer, has
donated 35 short story manuscripts
to New York University, it was
announced by Dr. George Win-
chester Stone, NYU dean of
libraries.
* 4 *
MORRIS A. LIFSHAY, Detroit
chairman of Poale Zion, was
elected a member of the Ameri-
can Institute of Planners. Active
in the recent creation of the De-
troit Zionist Federation as chair-
man of the nominating committee,
he also is architect and planner
of the new Labor Zionist Institute
under construction in Farmington.
Aregistered architect and commu-
nity planner, and a member of the
American Institute of Architects,
Lifshay heads Morris A. Lifshay
and Associates, Ferndale.
*
Dr. RACHMIEL LEVINE, au-
thority on metabolic disorders,
has been named medical center
director of the City of Hope. Dr.
Levine has served as professor
and chairman of the department of
medicine at New York Medical
College and has served at Michael
Reese Hospital, Chicago, the
University of Chicago and Chicago
Medical School. Editor-in chief of
the journal "Hormone and Meta-
bolic Research," he is the author
of more than 130 medical publi-
cations. He is consultant to the
National Science Foundation and
has been president of the Associa-
tion for Research in Nervous and
Mental Diseases, as well as of the
American Diabetes Association.
• • •
EDWARD M. M. WARBURG,
New York civic leader and philan-
thropist, has been named chairman
of the President's Council of New
York University's school of educa-
tion. NYU President James M.
Hester announced Warburg's ap-
pointment to the council, a newly
formed advisory group designed to
bring the school and community
into closer collaboration.

Jewish Folk Chorus
Concert Sunday

Cantor Louis Klein will be guest
artist at the Jewish Folk Chorus'
annual Mid-Winter Concert 8 p.m.
Sunday at the Jewish Center.
The chorus, directed by Harvey
Schreibman, will present the
second performance of the can-
tata "In the Desert" by I. E.
Ranch and Vladimir Heifetz. Also
on the program -will be a group of
new English, Yiddish and Hebrew
songs.
For tickets, call Regina Litt,
BR 2.0330, or obtain them at the
box office Sunday evening.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
Friday, December 18, 1970-41

If the long war is lost,'it will be
because such things are• not
done, or not done In time."
Crozier comments on Communist
intrusions in the Middle East and
the assistance that has been given
the Arabs. While indicating the al-
liance that was formed by Nikita
Khrushchev with the Arab Socialist
Union in Egypt, he indicates as an
indication of betrayals:
"The Russians have never
troubled themselves to help perse-
cuted Communist parties if, at a
given time, Soviet State interests
made it expedient to maintain good
relations with the appropriate gov-
ernment. For years after the Sov-
iet arms deal with Egypt in 1955,
Egypt's Communists continued to
languish in Nasser's jails. Simi-
larly, Stalin was on good terms
with Chiang Kai-shek while the
latter was waging war on Mao's
communist guerrillas (an early
cause of the Sino-Soviet rift)."
There is reference also to De-
Gaulle's policies and Crozier
charges that "by banning ship-
ments of arms to Israel, he in-
directly helped Soviet policy in
the Near East."
Crozier lists in an appendix In-
ternational Front Organizations
and in describing early in his book
the work of the World Council of
Peace he states: "In the Arab-Is-
raeli dispute, all its structures
have been reserved for the Is-
raelis, the Arabs receiving praise
and support"
The author goes into detail to
describe the Czechoslovak tragedy
and the defection of the Czech
author, Ladislav Macacko, who
went to Israel and left his native
land as a protest against the com-
munist persecutions.

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