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January 09, 1970 - Image 17

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1970-01-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Friday, January 9, 1970-17

Youth Aliya Hadassah Exhibit

The premiere of Hadassah's multi-media exhibition, "We Want
to Live," on view through Jan. 18 at the New York Cultural Center,
depicting 35 years of Youth Aliya, attracted a glittering throng. At
right are Mrs. Arthur J. Goldberg, wife of the former U.S. Supreme
Court Justice, and Richard Tucker, Metropolitan Opera star. At the
left are Allon Schoener, who designed the exhibition and Mrs. Max
Schenk, Hadassah's national president. The magnified photographs
show a few of the 135,000 children from 80 countries who have been
rescued, rehabilitated and educated through Youth Aliya's program
in Israel.

Inflationary Threats to Israel

By ELIAHU SALPETER

(Copyright 1970, JTA, Inc.)

The public argument over the
Cooling of relations between Israel
and the United States, following
publication of American proposals
for an Israel-Egyptian and Israel-
Jordanian settlement has had re-
grettable results in a non-political
area—the country's serious econ-
°Mk situation.
Logically, if the country is wor-
ried about political pressure from
abroad, special attention should
be given to the economic aspects
of its ability to stand up to such
pressure. Responsible government
leaders and publicists argue along
these lines. However, the broad
public is too busy worrying about
Washington's reported effort to de-
tach itself from close association
with Jerusalem, to pay much at-
tention to the economic front. Peo-
ple concentrate on political and
military events almost to the ex-
clusion of the grave economic
situation.
Israel's leading satirist, Efraim
Kishon, some weeks ago described
a nightmare he had of inadvertent-
ly crossing the border and being
captured by El Fatah. They are
about to execute him, when sud-
denly, in a flash of genius, he tells
them that he is not just any Is-
raeli, but an Israeli port-worker.
Instanhis hands are untied, he
is offere a cup of coffee and wel-
comed to the campfire as a be-
loved comrade - in - arms. Arafat
loved
(the El Fatah leader) tells him:
"Continue, brother, continue; we
can never do as much against the
Zionist enemy as you do!"



Indeed, there was hardly a
month in the past two years with-
out a strike of some kind or an-
other at one or all of Israel's sea-
ports. Damages to the nation's
economy has run into tens of mil-
lions of dollars. The latest strike
IS by stevedores who load Israel's
citrus exports at Haifa. They have
succeeded in halting shipment of
the nation's second most important
Ituf-POrt commodity, just as the sea-
son is getting into full swing.
The present strike has less to do
With Haifa than with Histadrut
headquarters in Tel Aviv. For the
first time in recent .years, Hista-
drut is not even tacitly supporting
the Haifa Port Administration's
proposals for efficiency measures,
the root of all port strikes here.
Histadrut came out against the
port administration.
Some observers attribute this
change to the new secretary gen-
eral of the * Histadrut, Yitzhak Ben
Aharon, the first non-Mapai leader
to hold that office. Ben Aharon
belongs to the former Ahdut Avoda
'faction- (now-'merged with

Mapai and Rafi in the Israel La-
bor Party). He is ideologically
more doctrinaire than any of his
predecessors in the past two de-
cades. To him, Israel is sharply
divided into workers and capital-
ists. Another practical reason for
his tough stand may be the huge
increases he is demanding in the
new wage agreements about to be
negotiated for 1970. Reportedly,
Ben Aharon feels that one of the
major reasons for wildcat strikes
in recent years was the frittering
away of Histadrut authority over
the workers. To regain this auth-
ority, the majority of the workers
must be convinced that the trade
unions are fighting hard for their
interests.
• • •
Economists fear that if Ben
Aharon insists on his wage de-
mands—and the government gives
in—Israel's economy is due for a
dangerous inflationary cycle of
wage increases, higher prices,
higher taxes and a critical slow-
down in the country's export drive.
Selling more abroad—as well as
increasing production at home to
reduce imports—is no less crucial
than the ability to purchase more
tanks and planes; a further deter-
ioration of Israel's foreign cur-
rency reserves may gravely hurt
her ability to buy vital war
materiel.
Israel's foreign currency re-
serves are down to almost half of
what they were after the Six-Day
War. This is partly due to the
need for heavy defense expendi-
tures abroad. It is also the result
of increasing imports of consumer
goods, on one hand, and a lag in
exports to hard-currency countries.
Pinhas Sapir, who has again
taken over the ministry of finance
in the new cabinet, has warned
of serious belt-tightening ahead.
Whether Histadrut helps him may
be one of the most important ques-
tions of the new year.

Franco to Get First Copy
of Book on Jews' Rescue
NEW YORK—The first rabbi to
be invited by the Spanish govern-
ment as its official guest, Dr.
Chaim U. Lipschitz, president of
the National Information Bureau
for Jewish Life, Inc., will present
to Generalissimo Franco of Spain
the first manuscript of a book he
wrote on "Franco and the Jews,"
a documented review of the gen-
eral's role in saving 60,000 Jews of
Europe during World War II.
On Tuesday, Dr. Lipschitz left
New York for a 19-day visit to
Spain. The rabbi is carrying an
ancient sacramental wine cup to
be given to Franco, a gift from
Rabbi Abraham Gross, president
of the Rabbinical Alliance of
America. - -

Study Finds Losses
in Freedom in M.E.

NEW YORK—The Middle East
suffered a net loss of freedom in
1969, it was reported by Freedom
House in its 18th annual "Balance
Sheet of Freedom" issued last
week.
The nonpartisan institution de-
scribes itself as an organization
dedicated to the strengthening of
free societies.
The balance sheet, compiled
from reports of area specialists,
scholars and the world press, con-
demned Palestinian guerrillas for
stepping up their attacks around
Israel's borders and the Israeli
counter blows.
The report also said that coups
d'etat in Libya, Somalia and
the Sudan had left "radical
Arabs" ruling "most of Africa
north of the Sahara."
Repression of dissent in the
Soviet Union was harsher than
usual in 1969, particularly against
many intellectuals and against
organized religion, the report said.
"The humiliation of Alexander
Dubcek" in Czechoslovakia also
was condemned.
The study said that it was "no
small achievement" that "man-
kind survived the sixties with
existing freedoms fairly intact."

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