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August 01, 1969 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1969-08-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

UN Observers' Status in Jeopardy



(Continued from Page 1)

That sent condolences to the
Swedish government, and Lt. Gen.
Odd Bull, chief of the observer
team, has transmitted his con-
dolences to the wife and two chil-
dren of Maj. Plane who live in
Cairo. Yosef Tekoah, Israel's am-
bassador to the UN, sent a brief
note to Thant expressing "pro-
found grief and condolences." He
said that Maj. Plane died "in the
cause of peace, in an endeavor
devoted to the maintenance of
the cease fire essential for the
establishment of lasting peace."
Thant himself has expressed re-
grets. The death of Maj. Plane
was- still under investigation, Lt.
Gen. Bull said, and further details
were to be reported.

There are no UN observers on
the Israeli-Jordan or Israel-Syria

cease-fire lines. A UN source
recalled that another observer
had been killed in Syria just

alter the Six-Day War in 1967.
Maj. Plane's death was the first

at the canal, although at least
three observers have sustained
injuries while on duty. Their
injuries came from land mines
and artillery duels. Several of
the 20 observation posts have
been severely damaged by fire.
In warning recently that the ob-
servers might have to be with-
drawn, Thant said that "they can-
not be expected to serve as what
amounts to defenseless targets in
a shooting gallery." The military
observers' job is to keep track of
daily Israel-Egyptian fighting and
to report on it. as well as to make!
efforts to halt it. In addition to
the seven nations now represented,
Burmese officers have also been
members of the UN force.
(In Washington, State Depart-
ment spokesman Carl Bartch said
the United States was prepared,
along with other nations, to afford
more protection to the observers.)
WASHINGTON (JTA) — United
States officials said that there was
little substance to the Israeli posi-
tion that bilateral and Four Power
negotiations encouraged Arab vio-
lations of the United Nations cease-,
fire. These officials said they did
not think the level of violence had
ascended over a period of weeks
that included the recent American-
Soviet bilateral talks in Moscow. j
In the U.S. view military activity !
In the MidEast has reached a pla-
teau of being "constant," but it is '
not the official impression here
that events are moving toward a
climactic stage. The 10 hours of
talks of Joseph Sisco, assistant
secretary of state for Near East-
ern affairs, with Soviet leaders in
Moscow achieved "a bit of ad-
vance on some points." But some
fundamental differences remained,
the officials said.
Washington's main concern now
is not the daily violence but con-
centration on efforts to promote a
settlement through UN envoy Gun-
nar V. Jarring. But regardless of
whether there is a restoration of
the Jarring mission, the super-
power talks are vital and continue
to be "an element of restraint."
Sisco discussed with the Russian
the latest events and risks. The
U. S. presented Moscow with
counter-proposals that are now be-
ing studied by the Kremlin. Mos-
cow and Washington agreed to
continue bilateral talks as a "con-
tinuing process." Sisco returned
via Stockholm and gave Dr. Jar-
ring a briefing on the talks.
Sisco reportedly found Soviet
leaders very serious, business-like,
and candid on the Middle East, ac-
cording to officials. He came to
agreement on some points but dis-
agreed on others, officials said.
It was agreed that terms of settle-
ment be exchanged in a specific
way. The two powers are seeking
a common document for transmis-
sion through the Big Four to Dr.
Jarring. Instead of trying for a
final blueprint, which Washington
feels only the Israelis and Arabs
can agree upon, Washington is
seeking to create a framework of
basic principles for the parties
directly involved to deal with
through Dr. Jarring. • • - •

Sisco did not return from Mos-
cow with a feeling that the Rus-
sians thought the Middle East was
on the brink of a new war. Offi-
cials said that the U. S. expected
the present situation along the

the Kremlin would require Israeli
withdrawal from all occupied ter-
ritory prior to such agreement on
restricting the arms flow. It was
noted that there is avoidance here
of any mention of the Soviet mili-
tary personnel in Egypt. The prob-
lem is seen as not Russian mili-
tary support of the Arabs but
scrupulous adherence to the cease
fire by the Arabs and Israelis. The
official disclosed that Dr. Jarring
has no plans to convene the par-
ties at this time and is still await-

Friday, August 1, 1969—S

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

`Israel's Case Supported by Most Americans'

JERUSALEM (JTA)—The favor-
able image of Israel among Ameri-
cans generally has not changed and
most Americans feel that Israel's
case is righteous, Rabbi Herschel
Schacter, chairman of the Confer-
ence of Presidents of Major Ameri-
can Jewish Organizations, said here
Sunday. But, he added, because of
the increased anti-Israel propagan-
da from Arab sources, the Presi-
dents' Conference had set up a
committee to fight the Arab propa-
ganda.

cease-fire lines to continue for
some time. But they believed both
sides were interested in arriving
at a settlement. The U. S. is con-
vinced that both the Arabs and
Russians want the major power
talks to continue. The question of
arms limitation involving curtail.
ment of shipments from the U. S. ing the superpowers' efforts.
and Soviet Union to Middle East
JERUSALEM (JTA) — Foreign
He also said that Mrs. Meir's
came up in Sisco's Moscow Minister Abba Eban met separate-
talks. U. S. officials disclosed that ly in the past few days with the visit to the U.S. in September
would contribute greatly to Israel's

Arab Propaganda
Sent to State Dept.

(Continued from Page 1)
Aspects of the Clash Between
Zionism and Arab Nationalism."
There is also a question-answer
booklet distributed by the Palestine
Liberation Organization Research
Center in Beirut, which accuses
Israel of aggression, political as-
sassination and harassment of
United Nations truce observers.
There is also a reprint of an article
by I. F. Stone, the American jour-
nalist, which appeared in August
1967. in the New York Review of
Books, discussing approaches to
Arab-Israeli problems.

A spokesman for the Kuwaiti
embassy said that his government
had sent the material for distribu-
tion here. "One point of view has
been put forward (in the United
States) for the last 20 years. This
material we are distributing, gives
the Arab point of view," he said.
The protocol office of the State
Department said that foreign em-
bassies are not permitted to lobby
in Congress if their efforts are
directed at specific legislation. But
when there is an attempt to get a
general viewpoint across, it is
allowed unless the material is
scurrilous or highly offensive to
U.S. legislators.

"If (the literature) was terribly
objectionable or obnoxious, or if it
was so bad the other side objected,
we would talk to the embassy and
try to get them to stop or to tone
(it) down," the official said.

I was ever of opinion, that the
honest man who married and
brought up a large family, did
more service than he who con-
tinued single and only talked of
population. — Oliver Goldsmith .

dent Nixon and talks with other
members of the Nixon administra-
tion, there was a belief among
members of the Conference that
the administration was favorable
to Israel's needs and was con-
tinuing the Israel policy of the
Johnson administration.

MURRY KOBLIN
DOES HIS THING
AT 8440 W. 9 MILE
548-5600

British and United States ambas- cause and that American Jewry
sadors to Israel to discuss Middle was awaiting her arrival. He told
East problems. Eban met with a press conference that Mrs. Meir
British Ambassador John Barnes would attend a session of the Presi-
on Monday and American Ambas- dents' Conference.
sador Walworth Barbour Tuesday.
He reported that after the Con-
The ambassadors asked for the
ference held meetings with Presi-
meetings to clarify Israel's posi-
tion in connection with recent Mid
East developments.
Eban mentioned the Soviet
note assuring Egypt of unre-
served political and military sup-
port and said that this indicated the
Soviet policy of preventing peace
in the area, in contrast to the
41110... hasa bettor idea
efforts by the Russians to present
Because they have
themselves to world public opinion
as seeking Mid East peace.

IRV KATZ
at

Romanian Jews Run
Convalescent Homes

GENEVA (JTA)—The Federation
of Jewish Religious Communities
of Romania is operating holiday
resorts and convalescent homes
with accommodations for 500 per-
sons, Dr. Moses Rosen, chief rabbi
of Romania, reported here.
He told JTA that the holiday re-
sorts are patronized by students
and young intellectuals who may
attend courses in Hebrew, Jewish
studies and Jewish music, both re-
ligious and popular. The courses ,
are given by resident instructors ,
and visiting lecturers. Rabbi Rosen
said the resorts and convalescent
homes offer kosher cuisine.

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