100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

April 14, 1967 - Image 39

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1967-04-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

New Stars on Baseball Horizon

Now that Sandy Koufax has re-
tired from baseball. will there be
another Jewish superstar to take
his place? Maybe not right away.
but Ken If
and Mike
Epstein are warming up in the
bullpen. Both appear to have all
the tools. Holtzman had a wonder-
ful rookie season with the last-
place Cubs in 1966. and Epstein
was the minor league player of
the year.

Holtzman. pitching with almost

I

IMPORTANT! NO ONE UNDER 18
WILL BE ADMITTED UNLESS
ACCOMPANIED BY HIS PARENT

EILINIIIEBEE111111
TAYLOR

no professional experience and at-
tending college part of the time.
posted an 11-16 record. His biggest
victory came at the expense of his
idol Koufax. It was their first and
last meeting. A southpaw, like
Koufax, the 20-year-old Holtzman
hurled a no-hitter for eight innings
before yielding two hits and a run
in the ninth. Holtzman and the
Cubs won the game 2.1.
"He's got a real good fast ball
and a good curve," remarked
Koufax after the game. "He
ought to have a great career."
bright as the future looks
for Holtzman. it looks just as
shiny for Epstein. The Baltimore
behemoth, 6-3. 238. did everything
asked of him in the minors. - He

IRscsagesaza
EillARETER1111

hat a Gruesome

WOSOME!

IN Mae= ialimarm raciouCTON
or EDWARD auserS

WHO's

1111wwara ■ cs OF

LIEDNIME
IN HIP ,

Ilinws11111111111

?.2

MAKEIVEN
=TED
WOMAN

GEORGE SEGAL SANDY DENNIS 11
Fame* NM( taCMOLS •■ ••••••••22 •• WARNER anal

COLOR

BYPI:11.!

13 Academy Award Nominations

2o.

FRI., MON., TUES.: Open 6:45,
Shown 1:40 Only. SAT. EVE.: Re-open
6:4S Shown, 7:00, 10:45. SUN.: Open
12:30, Shown 1:00, 4:45, II:35.

"NEVER ON SUNDAY

"THE

rr

FRI., MON., TUES.: 7:00, 10:45. SAT.
EVE.: 9:15. SUN.: 3:15, 7:00, 10:45.
• •

SAT.: MATINEE. All Color, "Pied
Piper of Hamlin" and "Island of the
Blue Dolphin." Open 1:00, Shown
1:25, Out 4:25.

COLOR

s• De., se

:'01

BERKLEY THEATRE

FO

LI 2 , 0330

12 MILE AT COOLIDGE

NOW
vto 1.1)11

Red Auerbach and the deposed
Adolph Schayes. Zaslofsky, like
Schayes, is a former NBA all-
star. He is slated to lead the New
York franchise team in the new
American Basketball Association.
The new league, and the ex-
pansion of the NBA. may see more
Jewish collegians taking a shot
at the professional game. Last
season only Rudy LaRusso, L.A.
Lakers. and Ron Watts of the
Celtic's played in the NBA.
Jewish owners abound in both
leagues: Mary Kratter, Celtics;
Ire Kosloff, 76ers: Arnold Heft.
Bullets: Ben Kerner. Hawks and
the expansion teams; Eugene
Klein and Sans Schulman, Seattle,
and Bob Brietbard. San Diego in
the NBA.
In the ABA. Arthur Brown. New
York and Gabe Rubin. Pittsburgh.
Red Auerbach is general manager
of the Celtics, and Adolph Schayes
is supervisor of NBA officials.
Karl Sweetan, Detroit Lion
quarterback, will give the pro-
fessional football fans an op-
portunity to see if he can better
his fine rookie season. The
Texas terror seems to have a big
league arm.
Booth Lusteg will be kicking
the football again for the Buffalo
Bills. Lusteg, a rookie, tied for
second place in scoring last year
in the AFL.
It will be a comeback year for
the Jewish head coaches. Both
Allie Sherman of the N.Y. Giants
and Sid Gillman of the San Diego
Charges will try to prove last
year was a big mistake. Gillman
will be aided by perennial all-star
tackle, Ron Mix.
Jewish executives in the pro
game include: Sonny Werblin,
N.Y. Jets; Max Winter, Minnesota
Vikings; Carroll Rosenbloom, Bal-
timore Colts; Art Modell, Cleve-

By JESSE SILVER

(Copyright. 1967, JTA, Inc.)

was the most valuable player in
the California League in 1965 and
in the International League in
1966. As a first baseman he led
both leagues in homers and runs.
batted in.
While Holtzman could be a fu-
ture Koufax, Epstein may be the
next Hank Greenberg. He is built
like Greenberg. hits with power
like Greenberg. was born in the
Bronx like Greenberg. and has
been asked to move from first
base to the outfield like Green-
berg. Epstein has the same great
desire to make good like Green-
berg, and could, like Greenberg.
end up in Baseball's Hall of Fame.
Art Shamsky showed lots of
power last year, and if he gets
the opportunity to play as a
regular, may be just as good a
prospect for greatness as Holtz-
man or Epstein. The Cincinnati
outfielder, 25, is starting his
third season.
Richie Scheinblum, an outfielder
for the Cleveland Indians, and
Norm .Miller, an outfielder-third
baseman for the Houston Astros.
are good looking prospects who.
may be a year or two away.
Two veteran pitchers who can
still hit the baseball headlines
are Larry Sherry, the fine De-
troit reliefer, and Barry Latman
of the Astros who should have
some more good years left in
him.
On the executive side, Jerry
Hoffberger is the proud owner of
the world champion Orioles, and
Gabe Paul runs the Cleveland
Indians.
Professional basketball in the
1967-68 season will see a Jewish
coach again at the head of a pro
club. Max Zaslofsky will move into
the place left vacant by the retired

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

40 — Friday, April 14, 1967

,
HER& WHERE TO... z3k irlStra

BARBEQUE

-CHICKEN

CHECKER BAR-B-a

UNDER NEW
M

RIBS • CHICKEN • SHRIMP

Delivered "HOT" — UN 4-7700
20050 Livernois, Just South of 8 Mile

FEATURING FAMILY STYLE BROASTED CHICKEN

Complete Dinner Menu
29501 NORTHWESTERN

OPEN 9:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.

EL 6-9222

3 Blks. N. of 12 Mile

Carry-Out Service

CHINESE FOODS

EMPRESS
GARDEN

Private

room

Specializing in Cantonese Cuisine
Enchanting Oriental Atmosphere

Open Mon. thru Fri. 11 a.m.-10:30 p.m.
Sat. II a.m.-11:30 p.m.; Sun. Noon-10:30 p.m.
Combination Dinners Every Weekday

for parties — Businessmen's Lunches

In Harvard Row Shopping Center at 11 Mile and Lahser Rd.
Orders To Take Out
356-4750

HOA KOW INN

Specializing in
Cantonese Food

Open Daily 11 a.m.-11 p.m. — Sat. 11 a.m.-2 a.m.
Free Parking
Carry•Out Service
13715 W. 9 MILE RD., OAK PARK
LI 7-4663

HOUSE of
CHUNG

CHINESE-AMERICAN RESTAURANT
Lunches - Dinners - Carry Out
DI 1-6460
8926 W. 7 Mile at Wyoming
OPEN: SUN.. NOON-10:30 P.M.;
MON. thru THURS.. 11-10:30 P.M.
FRI., 11-1 A.M.; SAT.. 11-3 A.M.

KOW KOW INN

Open 11 cm. to
3 am. Daily
Famous Chop Suey • Cantonese Food • Steaks • Chops • Sea Food
EASY PARKING
CARRY OUT SERVICE
TO 11-7530
322 W. McNichols, Bet. Woodward a S

WING HONG

Chinese - American

Restaurant

18203 W. 10 Mile Rd. at Southfield
353-6417

Specialtzmg In
Cantonese Family Dinners
ORDERS TO TAKE OUT
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
Mon. thru Fri. 11-10:30 p.m.
Sat. 10-1 a.m. Sun. 12 Noon-10 p.m.

BUSINESSMEN'S LUNCH SPECIAL 1

10 a.m. to 9 p.m.

CARL'S

CHOP HOUSE

LUNCHES - DINNERS
PASTRIES - WAFFLES AND
OUR SPECIAL FRENCH TOAST
Carry-Outs, Distinctive Buffet Tray Catering,
Finest Corned Beef Sandwiches and
Sandwich Combinations
Ample Parking

UN 3-3298

Fre• Parking.

CHOICE LIQUORS
BANQUET FACILITIES

Specializing in Pizza Pie and Famous Italian Foods

Parking Facilities . . . Carry-Out Service

7101 PURITAN—Open 11 . a.m. to 3 a.m.—UN 1-3929

PARADISO CA F E

nda ,gia l:ra b n le Food
B oaq eu r7c tar n oo am
Fine
open daily 11:30 a.m.-1 a.m.
CLOSED SUNDAYS

COCKTAIL BAR
17632 WOODWARD — North of 6 Mile

VANNELLI'S

TO 9-3988

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

• Luncheons • Dinners

PRIVATE ROOMS FOR

Restaurant & Cocktail Lounge

BANQUETS AND PARTIES
Famous for American a Italian Food
For Over 25 Years
• Steaks • Chops • Seafood
111300 Woodward
Free Parking
TO 94040

MID-EASTERN

ALI BABA

50 MANCHESTER
PHONE TO 6-4333
HIGHLAND PARK

Off Woodward
Open Daily 5 p.m. to 2 a.m.; Sat. 6 p.m. to 2 a.m. Closed sun. & Mon.
Specializing in Shiskebah. Stuffed Grape Leaves, Steaks and Chops.
Entertainment Nights. No Cover. No Minimum

PANCAKES AND WAFFLES

GOLDEN GRIDDLE

• 42Varieties of Pancakes &
Waffles
• 12 Delicious Varieties of Eggs &
Omelets
• Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner

PANCAKE HOUSE

Home Of The
GOLDEN 'WONDER WAFFLE

Featuring Parfait Pies• — Key Lime,
etc.
6:30 am. to 7 am. Sun. thru Thurs.
Fri. 'DI 2:30 a.m. Sat. III 3:30 p.m.

549 - 2900

CHIN TIKI

WELCOME TO DETROIT'S NEWEST
AND EXCITING RESTAURANT

OPEN 7 DAYS 'TILL 2 A.M.

• Exotic Tropical Cocktails and Food
• Buffet Luncheons
2121 CASS (N. of Gd. River)
962-1434

SEA FOODS

STEAKS. CHOPS. ErTC. ,

3020 GRAND RIVER.

ITALIAN FOODS

MARIA'S PIZZERIA

POLYNESIAN

Seven Days a Week

19171 Livera•ls at 7 Mile



3017 N. WOODWARD, Royal Oak

DELICATESSENS

Restaurant a
Delicatessen

ENTERTAINMENT NIGHTLY AFTER 2 A.M.

Closed Monday

TE 3-0700

Private Banquet Rooms for wedding parties. Serving
the World's Finest Steaks. Chops and Sea Foods for

mare Men 26 roars. AY Beef aged In our cellars.

CLAM SHOP

TR 4-2870

Serving Oysters, Clams, LOBSTERS, Steaks

Music by Muzak

and Assorted Sea Foods

2675 E. GRAND BLVD.

land Browns; Jerry Wolman, Phila-
delphia Eagles; and Al Davis,
Oakland Raiders.
Best of the college performers
should be Glenn Meltzer, end, the
1966 NCCA pass catching cham-
pion for Wichita State; Mike Blatt,
linebacker, Florida State; Al Cla-
man. tackle, UCLA; Glenn Green-
berg, tackle and Bruce Weinstein.
end, Yale; Dick Sandler, tackle,
Princeton; Alan Pepper. guard,
Missouri; Steve Pitler, tackle,
and Brent Kaufman, halfback,
Rhode Island; and Steve Tannen,
defensive halfback, Florida. Mary
Levy, William & Mary head coach.
will probably field another winner.

Soccer, the newest big-time pro-
fessional sport in the U.S., will
have its share of Jewish execu-
tives. Jerry Hoffberger will head
the Baltimore club in the National
Professional League, while Gabe
Paul, Cleveland; Earl Foreman,
Washington and Bob Wolff, New
York, will operate in the North
American Soccer League.

Expansion will hit the National
Hockey League and Sidney Solo-
mon, Jr., and Jerry Wolman will
have teams in St. Louis and Phila-
delphia, respectively.

Danny Raskin's

LISTENING

P
0
S

T

By Guest Columnist
DR. JACK JACKMAN

When it comes time to pass out
the laurels one 'of the most deserv-
ing is Lester Wolf, who recently
donate!! his 102nd pint to the Per-
fectiori Masonic Lodge Blood Bank
. . . Many members not only are
happy to claim Les as a fraternity
brother, but because of his un-
selfish generosity, a blood relation
as well.

In company with another travel
agent at a nearby eatery, Book-
Couzens' Helen Warshaw ordered
a bowl of soup, and after being
served. called the waiter' back and
indignantly asked, "What is this
fly doing in my soup?", to which,
after a quick glance, the waiter
replied, "the backstroke, ma'am,
the backstroke."

Founded in 1939 by a group of
Michigan members of Lions Inter-
national, the Leader Dogs for the
Blind at Rochester has made tre-
mendous strides in aiding the in-
dependence of the sightless person
. . . As the institution grew, so
did the demand, and at the present
time there is an acute shortage of
dogs . . . The breeds most com-
monly used are German Shep-
herds, Labrador, Golden and
Chesapeake Bay Retrievers . all
leader dogs must be friendly,
healthy and willing to accept re-
sponsibility; age-wise, under two
. . . If you are in a position to
donate such an animal, or know
someone who is, please contact
651-9011, and arrangements will
be made to pick the dog up
. . Incidentally, there is abso-
lutely no charge to the sightless
person, which besides a friendly
aid, includes four week's room and
board.

'Spiritual Task Force'
for Outlying Communities

CHARLESTON, S.C. — A Spir-
itual Task Force to provide rab-
binic leadership to outlying Jewish
communities throughout the
United States and Canada has been
established by the Union of Ortho-
dox Jewish Congregations of
America, it was announced Sun-
day by Joseph Karasick, UOJCA
national president, at the 22nd
anniversary convention of the or-
ganization's Southeast Region.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan