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November 04, 1966 - Image 37

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1966-11-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

the Beggar Girl

By JOSEF FRAENKEL

Jewish News Correspondent in London

"Schenkt mir a neduve!" "Give
me some alms!" — the words rang
in the streets of the little town
of Sindrik. The voice vibrated
melodiously, and everyone recog-
nized Rivka. She was very young,
with deep eyes in pale face and
long, black hair. She wore three
blouses over her long dress, sewn
together around the bottom edge
like a "Matzo-tasche" with three
layers. One was for "fleishig," one
for "pareve" and the third for
"milhig" food.
Rivka's parents had come to Sin-
drik from Linsk, and here they
settled. They lived by begging. Her
father would leave Sindrik every
Sunday for neighboring villages,
and would return on Fridays. Both
her parents died within the same
week• her mother in Sindrik, her
father on his way back home.

* * *

At first, Rivka wandered from
street to street crying: "Schenkt
mir a neduve!" Passers-by stopped
to stare at the young girl, some
women sighed and shook their
heads and children ran after her.
But Rivka liked the new "profes-
sion" she had inherited from her
parents. Some days afterward, the
leaders of the Jewish community
called a meeting to decide what
was to be done about Rivka. The
poor, orphaned child could not be
left in dire distress. They pro-
posed giving her a weekly sum of
money, or finding her work, but
Rivka turned down every sugges-
tion. In the end, so that Sindrik
should not be disgraced, they made
her promise not to beg openly on
the streets. Instead, she could call
upon the "better-class" homes; and
there she was given a few coins,
old clothes or food.
Rivka lived in a ramshackle, old
hut. When she arrived home at
the end of the day, she spread her
"earnings" on the table. From her
three-blouse "pockets" she with-
drew her food — the "fleishig,"
the "pareve" and the "milhig."
Then she counted her coins and
hid them in an old trunk. When-
ever she was given clothes she im-
mediately set about washing and
mending them. Then, put them
away carefully in a wardrobe:
dresses to dresses, blouses to
blouses. As evening approached
she would throw off her old rags,
wash herself, change into better
clothes, comb her hair and then
admire herself in a mirror. Tiring
of that, she would pull out the
trunk again: counting her coins
was her greatest pleasure.

4,

*

*

Some years passed, and Sindrik
had become accustomed to Rivka
the Beggar-Girl. They had long
since given up trying to persuade
her to change her ways. She was
always invited to share the Sab-
bath meal with a Jewish family
and she would arrive clean and
neatly-dressed, eyes glowing, teeth
gleaming, with her black hair hang-
ing down her back in two plaits.
She could easily have been taken

Elect . . . JUDGE

JOHN W.

CONNOLLY

CIRCUIT JUDGE

(For 6 Yr. Term Ending Jan. 1, 1973)
• Former Lt. Governor of Mich.
• 121/2 Yrs. on Common Pleas Bench

Pol.

for a member of the family as she
joined in the singing of the "Zmi-
rot." Her voice was sweet, so that
many a young man stole an admir-
ing glance in her direction. But,
who would marry her! On the fol-
lowing day she became Rivka the
Beggar-Girl, again.
One day, the Jewish community
of Sindrik was shaken to its foun-
dations. In the synagogue, in the
market-place, from house to house,
the excitement spread. Have you
heard! Rivka has inherited a mil-
lion. A relative in America had
died and Rivka was the sole in-
heritor. He had left a million, not
kronen, but dollar s. Everyone
hurried hotfoot to Rivka's hut, but
she had fled. Rivka had forsaken
Sindrik.

*

*

Rivka settled in the capital where
she bought a house. Then she began
to acquire beautiful and expensive
clothes and costly jewelry. She
became a regular visitor to the
theater and attended most of the
concerts, and gradually began to be
accepted in the town's best society.
Her house became the meeting-
place of writers, artists and diplo-
mats, and Rivka participated in
their discussions on art and litera-
ture, winning admiration all around
for her wit and beauty.
Rivka tried hard to forget her
past but found it an impossible
task. To the outside world she was
a rich heiress but still felt her-
self to be a beggar-girl. She could
not appreciate the value of bank-
notes but continued to hoard and
treasure her small coins. Happiness
always eluded her and she longed
continuously for the old days. Like
a narcotic deprived of his drugs
or a drunk of his bottle, she pined
for her alms and beggar's coppers.
* * *
Each Wednesday Rivka dismissed
her servants and had the house to
herself. Feeling elated, she would
dress up in her finest clothings.
Then in every corner. on tables, on
chairs, she would place something;
bread, butter, cheese, shoes,
clothes, a portion of chicken and
small coins. Every spot represent-
ed a certain Sindrik family: here
for Reb Yankiel; for Reb Arie; for
Reb Duvidel; there for Reb Men-
del; Reb Usher—for all those who
had once given her alms.
Rivka would then rub her face
and body with mud, ruffle her hair
and bring out her old rags. With
the old dress and blouses wrapped
around her, the cry—"Schenkt mir
a neduve" — would echo through
the house. Her eyes would shine
and her voice tremble with excite-
ment. She addressed each corner,
every chair and every table: "Reb
Yankel, I am a poor orphan girl!"
She stretched out her hand plead
ingly, and with the other hand
picked up the offering. "Reb Arie,
have pity on me! And tears
streamed down her cheeks. How
good people were, and she thanked
them all effusively. Her pockets
were filled to overflowing, and
with difficulty she managed to
mount the stairs. There she pulled
out her old trunk and lovingly
caressed each coin. When she had
finished, she laughed to herself
and danced a few steps before
bursting into song.
It was on a Wednesday that
Rivka died. She was found envel-
oped in old rags by the trunk! In
her hand she had a small coin,
and on her face was a satisfied
smile.
But the people in Sindrik nodded
their heads sadly and said: "A beg-
gar-girl remains a beggar-girl, even
when she inherits a million."

INJURIES

A man should be careful never
to tell tales of himself to his own
disadvantage; p e o p l e may be
amused, and laugh at the time, but
they will be remembered, and
brought up against him upon some
subsequent occasion. —Johnson

They that know no evil will sus-
—Ben Johnson
pect none.

Weizmann Award Goes
to Brig. Gen. Sarnoff

Friday, November 4, 1966-37

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

($33,300). Sir Isaac became an
honorary citizen of Acre by a
JERUSALEM (JTA) — The edu- unanimous vote of the Acre muni-
cation ministry reported that the
NEW YORK—Brigadier General Sir Isaac and Lady Wolfson cipal council Sunday night.
David Sarnoff, chairman of the Scholarship Fund for Secondary
board of the Radio Corp. of Ameri- and Higher Education awarded 2,-
RE-ELECT
ca, Wednesday night called on the 276 scholarships to needy students
advanced Western nations to learn in Israel during the past four
from the Weizmann Institute of years.
Science that "Science is here for
The fund was set up by the Brit-
To Recorders Court
the sake of humanity."
ish Jewish philanthropist as an
BALLOT NO. 297
Pol.
Gen. Sarnoff was the recipient of annual budget of 100,000 pounds
the first "Weizmann Award in the
Sciences and Humanities" at a
dinner here under the auspices
of the American Committee for
the Weizmann Institute of Science.
Sarnoff, who was ill, could not at-
tend the dinner. His remarks were
read by his son, Robert Sarnoff,
who also accepted the award for
his father.
Attended by some 1,200 leaders
in science, business and public af-
fairs, including nine Nobel laure-
ates, the dinner marked the 21st
anniversary of the first founders
Democrat
dinner held in New York in 1945,
where the first million dollars was
67th District
raised to establish the Weizmann
Institute of Science at Rehovot,
Rated: "PREFERRED" Oakland Citizens League
Israel.

Fund Aids 2,276 Pupils

(Direct JTA Teletype Wire
to The Jewish News)

JUDGE
FRANK G. SCHEMANSKE

Re-Elect .. .
ALBERT A.

KRAMER

STATE REPRESENTATIVE

Row Stops Brandt Talk
to Jewish Community

WEST BERLIN — Mayor Willy
Brandt canceled his scheduled ap-
pearance at a Jewish community
meeting here after a controversy
over his sending flowers to the
daughter of Nazi war criminal
Albert Speer.
The mayor sent the flowers to
Speer's daughter, he said, as a
gesture of reconciliation toward a
new generation. Speer, former
Nazi armaments minister and close
associate of Adolf Hitler, was re-
leased recently from Spandau
Prison at the end of a 20-year sen-
tence.

COMMITTEES:
Chairman, House Committee on Insurance
Chairman, Special Committee to study public school psychological
testing
Member of House Committees on education, private corporations and
state affairs.
Co-chairman of the Sub-Committee relating to the matter of the Public
Bank
Co - sponsor of 1965-1966 record school aid legislation
Co - sponsor of the Landmark Senior Citizens Property Tox Exemptio•
Relief Measure






Graduate Wayne State University, Bachelor of Laws, 1949

Practicing Attorney — 17 years
World War II Veteran — U.S. Army 35 Months
Member JWV, L.Z.O.A., Bnai Brith

Re-Elect Albert A. KRAMER

State
Representative
Pol.

Robert E.

• Practicing Attorney 15 years • Former Assistant United States Attorney,
Chief Criminal Division.• LLB, Wayne State • WWII Vet, • Married,
three children • Member American, Federal, Mich.& Detroit Bar Associa-
tions • Eridorsed b Civic, Business, Labor, and Fraternal Groups

Your Court Needs TM Kind o Man

LAWYERS FOR COLOMBO

WE HEARTILY RECOMMEND AND ENDORSE
THE CANDIDACY AND ELECTION OF

ROBERT J.

COLOMBO

FOR

RECORDER'S
JUDGE

NO. 278 ON YOUR BALLOT

MYRON ALPERT
IVAN BARRIS
MARVIN BLAKE
BERNARD BOCKNEK
ALLEN CHALFIN
MURRAY CHODAK
I. GOODMAN COHEN
GABRIEL C,OHEN
SIDNEY COHN
ALBERT COLMAN
ALBERT CONN
GARY EISENBERG
NORMAN FEDER
MORTON FISHER
ARTHUR FIXEL
ROLAND FIXEL

ELI FRIEDMAN
BENJAMIN GANTZ
FREDERICK GARON
SOL E. GOLDBERG
FREDERICK GARON
SOL E. GOLDBERG
ALBERT A. GOLDFARB
ALLEN P. GOLDSTEIN
STUART HERTZBERG
MAX HORWOOD
BERNARD KAHN
SEYMOUR KATZER
IRVING KROLL
HERMAN KASS
SANFORD LAKIN
ALBERT LOPATIN

MAX MARSTON
ALBERT MILLER
MORRIS MILMET
NORMAN OCHS
GEORGE PARZEN
BALFOUR
ELLIOTT PERLMAN
SEYMOUR POSNER
SAMUEL RHODES
ARTHUR RICE
SANFORD ROSENTHAL
LOUIS ROSENZWEIG
BENJAMIN ROTH
SEYMOUR ROWE

ARTHUR RUBIN
SIDNEY RUBY
THEODORE SACKS
MYRON SCHIFMAN
FRANK SCHWARTZ
JOSEPH SIEGEL
SAMUEL SIMMER
LEONARD SIMONS
IRVING STAHL
ALLEN STOWE
BERNARD TALON
LOUIS TUCKER
MAURICE VICTOR
HERBERT WEINGARTEN
MAURICE WELLER
STANLEY WISE
Pol.

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