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April 08, 1966 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1966-04-08

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THE JEWISH NEWS

Incorporating The Detroit Jewish Chronicle commencing with issue of July 20, 1951

Member American Association of English-Jewish Newspapers, Michigan Press Association, National Editorial
kasociation.
Published every Friday by The Jewish News Publishing Co., 17100 West Seven Mile Road, Detroit 48235 Mich.,
YE 8-9364. Subscription $6 a year. Foreign $7.
Second Class Postage Paid at Detroit, Michigan

PHILIP SLOMOVITZ

Editor and Publisher

CARMt M. SLOMOVITZ

Business Manager

SIDNEY SHMARAK

Advertising Manager

CHARLOTTE RYAMS

City Editor

Sabbath Hol Ha-Moed Passover Scriptural Selections

Pentateiuchal portions: Ex. 33:12-34:26, Num. 28:19-25.
Prophetical portion: Ezekiel 37:1-14.

Hol Ha-Moed Passover Scriptural Selections

Sunday: Num. 9:1-14, 28:19-25.

Scriptural Selections for Concluding Days of Passover

Pentateuchal portions: Monday, Ex. 13:17-15:26, Num. 28:19-25; Tuesday,
Deut. 15:19-16:17, Num. 28:19-25.
Prophetical portions: Monday, II Sam. 22:1-51; Tuesday, Is. 10:32-12:6.

Licht Benshen, Friday, April 7, 6:47 p.m.

Page 4

VOL. XLIX. No. 7

April 8, 1966

Record of Our Giving: Must Enroll More Donors

On only four occasions, since 1947, have
incomes from Allied Jewish Campaigns ex-
ceeded the amount raised in 1965. But in 15
of the 19 years under review there were
more contributors than those who were en-
listed in the drive last year. The fund-raising
record for the years 1926 to 1965, given here,
offers a complete outline of the past record:

Year
1926 (a)

Number of
Amount Pledged Pledges
3,185
$ 738,242

(a) Funds were raised for a three-year period-
1926, 1927 and 1928.

1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943 (War Chest)
1944 (War Chest)
1945 (War Chest)
1946 (War Chest)

1,599
130,473
5,047
326,017
4,646
218,270
4,302
140,113
3,330
112,913
4,752
139,500
8,063
220,454
8,235
318,421
9,908
350,690
13,374
390,732
19,080
651,889
20,440
735,970
21,118
835,633
22,445
897,341
850,000
960,000
1,135,940
3,744,351 (b) 22,120

(b) Includes $912,091 from the War Chest Campaign
conducted by the Community Chest of Detroit.

1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961

1962
1963
1964
1965 (Incomplete)

3,968,572
5,756,133
5,409,276
4,650,538
4,733,354
4,354,228
4,469,252
4,150,612
4,148,639
5,296,804
5,918,268
4,943,739
4,895,939
4,860,022
4,6'32,909
4,825,026
4,622,772
4,712,151
5,100,000

27,454
30,734
28,923
28,003
28,533
28,625
28,401
26,795
26,583
25,319
25,960
24,525
25,031
24,072
23,678
21,764
23,588
23,512
23,600

This is an impressive record, and the
commencement of another increase in giving
is, to the credit of a dedicated community
and good campaign direction, accompanied
by enlarged participation. This is a factor to
be welcomed, and the need for an increase in
the number of contributors proportionate to
the rise in giving power must be considered
as one of the basic responsibilities in the
present drive.

Campaign leaders and workers maintain
that this year's drive will come close to the
periods of highest giving. The goal is to raise
a minimum of $5,500,000, possibly approach-
ing the $6,000,000 mark. If this is to be at-
tained, it must be on the basis of a great rise
in the number of participants. We have no
doubt that there are in our community many
hundreds, possibly many thousands, who
have not been reached, who may be disinter-
ested, who are indifferent to the needs. If
they are approachable, it will require the
ingenuity of volunteer workers, or an in-
crease in the forces of the solicitors, to reach
the unenrolled. If the problem is one of in-
difference, then there must be a new means
of educating our people not to ignore their
kinsmen and to understand fully their
responsibilities.

The campaign is nearing its end, and all
indications are that a new high will be set in
the current drive's solicitations.

An encouraging factor was the Phon-0-
Gift campaign during which the women alone
enlisted many hundreds of additional contrib-
utors. With the same procedure as a major
aim of the other divisions, there is hope that
thousands who should contribute to the cur-
rent drive will yet be enrolled as contribu-
tors.
The 1966 Allied Jewish Campaign must
emerge not only with great results financially
but also as a great enrollment effort to
assure as large a participation as can pos-
sibly be mustered in a great humanitarian
effort.

Jewish Welfare Board's Golden Jubilee

When the Jewish Welfare Board was this country.
During World War II, JWB again became
founded 50 years ago, it was aimed at provid-
ing for the needs of the Jews in the armed the major Jewish organization that cared for
forces during World War 1. During the war the needs of the men and women in the armed
forces, and today, wherever there are Jews in
years, it served a most valuable purpose -
of caring for the spiritual wants of the tens uniform - whether it is in Vietnam or in
of thousands of men and women who needed Germany or France or Japan - and in all
inspiration, who craved for Jewish services, areas where our armed forces are stationed-
who asked for religious guidance and many the Jewish Welfare Board is alongside the
of whom were in need of kosher food which servicemen, providing them with religious
was secured for them by the active chaplains. inspiration, assuring them of holiday cele-
The JWB became the parent movement brations, ascertaining necessary food provi-
for the many Jewish Centers throughout the sions.
Thus, JWB is active on behalf of men in
country and it may well be said that at this
time more than 1,000,000 Jews of all ages the armed forces as well as in the centers
are benefiting from guidance in that field. where Jewish programs are planned and in
behalf of which JWB's staff prepares the
The fact that JWB has pioneered in
proper programing.
sponsoring Book Month through the Na-
The golden jubilee of JWB to be inaugu-
tional Jewish Book Council it was instru-
rated for an entire year's celebration through-
mental in organizing; the preparation of
out the country at the movement's national
program material for Jewish Centers; its
biennial convention in New York on April 9
encouragement to youth to participate in
merits the interest of Jews everywhere, since
athletic tournaments and many other JWB-
the JWB program reaches out not only in the
inspired projects have added greatly to the
United States and its territories but also in
enhancement of communal Jewish pro-
many lands where Americans are serving our
grams.
It is because of the variety of the JWB country. The golden jubilee celebration is an
programs that encouragement has been given occasion for observance by all American Jews
to Jewish leadership and has enabled youth because of the vital Jewish Center program
to graduate into adult Jewish activities in assured by JWB.

Smolenskin Portrayed as Zionist
Pioneer, Leader in the Haskalah

Much has been said about the period of Haskalah-enlightenment
-in Jewish life, but all-too-little has been written about the great
scholars who were the Maskilim. The biography of Peretz Smolenskin,
one of the noted Haskalah leaders, who, in his short life-1840-1885-
left an indelible mark on Jewish studies, is, therefore, to be heartily
welcomed.
Dr. Charles H. Freundlich, who now holds an educational direc-
tor's post in New Bedford, Mass., who studied in this country and in
Israel and who was ordained rabbi by the late Chief Rabbi of Israel,
Isaac Halevi Herzog, has written an interesting study in "Peretz
Smolenskin-His Life and Thought," published by Bloch.
It is a valuable work because it deals with the renascence of
Jewish nationalism, because it reviews not only the influences of
nationalism- but also of Reform Judaism and other forces in shaping
the ideals of the Haskalah period.

Dr. Freundlich goes into detail in his discussion of the relig-
ious-nationalist controversies preceding and during Smolenskin's
time, and the anti-Zionist sentiments that ensued. He clarifies the
misunderstood position of Moses Mendetssohn who, he states,
"hoped that the Jews would receive emancipation without having
to pay the price of assimilation." Changes in liturgy, use of the
organ in the synagogue and other developments are recalled. These
and the "easing of Sabbath restrictions" were,- according to Freund-
lich, "more the natural outcome of Teutonized Jews than a planned
reform ideology."

"Smolenskin attacked Reform" for its "inadequacy," but Freund-
lich asserts that the Maskil who is the subject of his biography "exag-
gerated the faults of Reform Judaism with its cosmopolitanism," and
he adds:

" 'Cosmopolitanism' was indeed the world view of western intellectuals.
But whereas the Italians, Poles, Czechs, Hungarians, Belgians and Irish had
outgrown this cosmopolitanism, the Jews in Western Europe had just begun
emphasizing it. Smolenskin, whose roots were from Eastern Europe, did not
properly appreciate German Reform Judaism. It was not Reform Judaism alone
that belittled the national element of Judaism. It was perhaps more the 'climate
of opinion' in Western Europe, which being Christian, made the idea of
Jewish nationhood most disturbing."

Further reviewing critically the Smolenskin attitude on national-
ism, Reform and the status of the Hebrew language, in his discussion
of Smolenskin's "Am Olam," Freundlich makes the interesting
observation that many Zionists, Joseph Klausner among them, were
confused "to view his anti-Reform views strictly as a case for politi-
cal-territorial Zionism. "The fact is," Freundlich writes, "Smolenskin
nowhere mentions the role of Palestine, or a state, in his program
for Jewish nationalism. His favorable view toward the Hebrew
language misled Eliezer Ben-Yehudah into thinking that he was
advocating the revival of Hebrew as a spoken language. In reality,
Smolenskin believed that Hebrew should not be a spoken language
but a medium to study and write Torah!"

The critical reactions to "Am Olam," Smolenskin's idealistic re-
lation to other Jewish scholars of his time, his zeal for Torah and
other factors are among the many aspects of a thorough study of
the Maskin in the Freundlich work. Smolenskin first advocated the
cultural aspect of Jewish nationalism and then turned to the prac-
tical and emerged among the Zionist precursors of Herzl. "With
the exacerbation of the Jewish problem in Romania and pogroms
in Russia in 1881, the optimism of the Enlightenment was shat-
tered," the biographer writes, and he points to Smolenskin's accep-
tance of the view that "Palestine is suitable for mass immigration."

"The word 'Torah'," Freundlich writes, "is used by Smolenskin to mean the
Spirit of Israel, e.g., all its ethical and ideological content. The settlement
(in Palestine) would house an elite of Jews who would be the vanguard of the
regeneration of the nation. The center would not be a community receiving
halukah (charity), but would have a definite obligation towards the Diaspora.
Like Ahad Ha-am later on, who was to articulate the idea of a 'Spiritual
Center,' there was not to be a complete negation of the Diaspora. Nevertheless,
both maintained that there would definitely be a spiritual hegemony of the
Israel community over the Diaspora."

The historically significant legacy of Smolenskin receives ac-
knowledgment. Freundlich writes: "His evaluation of anti-Semitism

from the Darwinian perspective led him. to advocate the colonization
of Palestine. In Palestine, where the Jews would become a majority,
there was envisioned a refuge from anti-Semitism. He had little
faith in the optimism of the Enlightenment as a solution to the
Jewish problem . . . It is indisputable that Smolenskin's thought was
instrumental in building the road to Zion . . . A world that has been
ravaged by the evil and inhumanity from a variety of nationalisms,
from Fascism through Nazism, would be well advised to pay heed
to Smolenskin's message. Rooted in the high ideals of Israel's
prophets, Jewish tradition and the humanism of the modern age,
he underscored the fact that nationalism was a movement of the
Spirit. The human spirit was the most vital ingredient in the making
of a nation. He thus drew up a blue-print of nationalism worthy of
Israel and a universal family of nations."

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