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August 21, 1964 - Image 37

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1964-08-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'They Called It Paradise'
The Russian school teacher
asked a pupil "Who were the
first human beings?"
"Adam and Eve," the young
boy replied.
"W h a t nationality were
they?"
"Russian, of course."
"Fine, fine," the teacher com-
mented. "And how did you
know they were Russians?"
"Easy," said the boy. "They
had no roof over their heads,
no clothes to wear, and only
one apple for the two of them—
and they called it paradise."

in the Most Promising
Comedy Hit of the
1964-5 Season

"Absence of
a Cello

by IRA WALLACH

with

Charles Grodin
Carol Byron

See it before Broadway —
opens in N.Y. at the Am-
bassador Theatre on Sep-
tember 21.

Phone Reservations

EL 3-3350

TIMES AND PRICES
Tues., Wed., Thurs. 8:30 p.m.
Sat., 6:00; Sun., 7:30 p.m.
$3.90 - $2.90 - $1.90
Fri., 8:30; Sat., 9:30 p.m.
$4.40 - $3.40 - $2.40
Friday Matinee at 2 p.m.
$1.69 and $1.10
TICKETS NOW AT:
• Playhouse Drive-In Box
Office
• Grinnell's, Downtown
• LaFond Cigars, Downtown
• All Sears Stores
• Marwil Book Store,
Northland
• Ross Music, Eastland
• LaBelle's Books, Birming-
ham
• Klein Travel, Windsor

MAIL

SEPT. 1-6

ORDERS PROMPTLY
FILLED. Makes checks pay-
able to Northland Playhouse,
Northland Center, Southfield,
Mich. Please enclose self-ad-
dressed, stamped envelope.

NEXT WEEK AUG. 25-30
Rogers and Hammerstein's

"SOUND OF MUSIC"

SEPT. 1-6

PH IL FOSTER
MARGARET O'BRIEN

"ONE IN A ROW"
SEPT. 8-13

JAYNE
MANSFIELD

in "BUS STOP"

AIR CONDITIONED
FREE PAVED PARKING

NORTHLAND
PLAYBOUSE

in Northland Center, off
Greenfield at 8 1/z Mile Rd.

• • :

;•:•1•7.•:7:•777.7•77

• •••:!::::::eL •

: eu.•

"'GOLDEN BOY' IS BOLD, ROARING, BRILLIANT, DI-
VERTING, GRAND, GLORIOUS, GOLDEN, GREATEST,
COMPELLING, SENSITIVE, HAUNTING, MEMORABLE,
TREMENDOUS."

The first news cartoon of "Uncle
Sam" appeared in the New York
Lantern, a comic weekly, on March
13, 1852.

Fred Clark
Ruth White
Murray
Hamilton
Mala Powers
Ruth
McDevitt



ANOTHER GREAT NEW MUSIC HIT!

NCCJ has no categoric an-
swers to problems in human
relations. It can only recom-
mend the spirit of brotherhood,
of understanding, respect and
good will as the means or tool
of arriving at justice and
equity for all.

LAST 4 DAYS THRU
SUNDAY, AUG. 23

; •1;

`Seduced and Abandoned'
Opened at the Studio-8

Boston Critics

taikt
Pietro G e r mi's "Seduced and
Abandoned" opened Wednesday at
the Studio-8, Greenfield north of
Eight Mile in the Green-8 shopping
Center.
Considered one of the best films
of 1964, the film received the ex-
hibitor's "gold ticket" award at the
1964 Cannes Film Festival, as well
as best director and best actor
awards.
Pictured above is Stefania San-
drelli, who plays a young Sicilian
girl in "Seduced and Abandoned."

`Golden Boy' Opens
at Fisher with
Davis on Tuesday

Sammy Davis begins a four week
engagement in the title role of
"Golden Boy" at the Fisher Theater
Tuesday, in a musical version of
the famous Clifford Odets play.
It is exactly three years since
producer Hillard Elkins convinced
Mr. Odets that his play would
make a good, modern musical and
cinching factor was that Sammy
Davis would give up the weekly
fortune he earns in night clubs to
play the leading role.
During the three years the play-
wright died but composer Charles
Strouse and lyricist Lee Adams—
they did "By Bye Birdie"—worked
with the director Peter Coe—he
staged "Oliver" with Davis and
Elkins and the results won critical
acclaim in Philadelphia and Boston.
To tell the tale of the young
Negro concert pianist who wanted
out from the slums in which he
was raised and who found it easier
to punch his way out via the prize
ring, the producers have surround-
ed Davis with an exceptional cast.
Heading the supporting players
is the one only "Old Black Magic"
man himself—Billie Daniels—who
plays a smooth, sophisticated sin-
ister representative of the "syn-
dicate." Paula Wayne, who scored
in New York last season in "Best
Foot Forward", plays manager Ken-
neth Tobey's girl friend, lost be-
tween the manager's need for her
and her more-than-platonic-interest
in the young Negro fighter. Ted
Beniades plays a small time box-
ing promoter; Roy Glenn—remem-
ber Amos and Andy—plays the
father who believes "there's music
in that boy."
A pulchritudinous Jeanette Du-
Bois plays Davis' sister, and John-
ny Brown, who jumped from under-
study into the lead role of brother-
in-law, nightly steals the show
when he duets "Don't forget 127th
Street" with the star. Jaime Rog-
ers does the sensational fight on
stage with Davis.
Charles Welch as the trainer and
Don Crabtree as a sports writer
round out the principals in the
cast.
"Golden Boy" will be at the
Fisher until Sept. 19 and there will
be a Sunday matinee and evening
performance on the 13th.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
Friday, August 21, 1964 37

clits a singing-dancing spectacle, a
vehicle to demonstrate the many
skills of Sammy Davis, it is not
only diverting but often brilliant,
and in one great climactic fight
scene, grand and glorious. When
Davis sings the cool Shubert glows
Norton, Rec. Am.
with his magic."

to 'Golden Boy' is bold, graphic,
roaring, rentless, and at its best.
damned close to brilliant."
Kelly, Globe

"Sammy Davis, acts, sings, makes
tGolden Boy' Golden."
Harris, Herald

'Davis is tremendous. You should
Ray, lint, Gus, mac.
see it."

Qe Malden Roy' packs a wallop
which leaves a deep imprint on
heart and mind. The performance
of Itlr. Davis is one of the greatest,
as compelling as a neon light; yet
sen4itive and haunted with his•
tonic longing. Hilly Daniels has
his own spot in the audience's
affection. His 'Golden Boy' will be
memorable. It's all great, but it's
Sammy Davis, after all, who's the

greatest:9

Nutmeg, Traveler

SEATS AT BOX OFFICE NOW

Ealc.

Mon. thru Thurs. Eves
and Sun. Eve., Sept. 13

Orch.

Mezz.

$6.50

$6.50

$5.00, $4.30, $3.75, $3.20

Fri. and Sat. Eves.

$7.00

$7.00

$5.50, $4.75, $3.75, $3.20

Wed. and Sat. Mats.
$3.75, $3.20, $2.65
$4.40
$4.40
and Sun. Mat., Sept. 13
(No Perf. Tues. Eve., Sept. 15 and Wed. Mat., Sept. 16)

EXTRA PERF. SUN. MAT. AND EVE., SEPT. 13

A PLAYGOER SUBSCRIPTION ATTRACTION

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