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May 15, 1964 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1964-05-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Story of 'Escaping' New York Jeivess Ideas of Jews as Told by Dnnont in New Paperback
"Jews, God and History," by
they spread the universal as-
Who Returns to Fold in New Novel
"idea." Then he may see that

There are members of minorities
who have tried to "pass." This has
been the case among blacks living
among predominantly white popu-
lations. It has been true about
Jews who have tried to escape, to
hide their identity, to pose as non-
Jews.
They are a tragic lot because
more often than not they are un-
able to hide their identity.
A story of an attempt at. flight
and the eventual return to normal
n
living and to dignified acceptance
of a Jewish status is told by Man
jorie Duhan Adler in "A Sign Upon
My Hand," published by Doubleday.
It is the story of Marianne who
detested her origin as an offspring
of Russian Jews living in New
York.
In her early years she already
began an attempt at hiding — it
was the beginning of social climb-
ing, or rejoicing at the family's
moving to Park Avenue, to be able
to claim status.
Often, in dating, she found her-
self compelled to say "I am a Jew"
or "I am a Jewess," but the prob-
lems mounted. An affair with a
married man, an abortion, an un-
happy conflict resulting from her
relationships with the man she
married, all added to the disturb-
ances of a person who needed
security.
That finally arrived. The rabbi
in the story, the lessons he taught,
the turn to Biblical lore, all helped
in a return to normal acceptance
of Marianne's heritage.
It was her father's death that
speeded her emerging from her

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dilemma. It was then that she met
the rabbi whose wise handling of
her problem brought her to her
senses. Prior to that she was at
non-Jewish services, she learned
about the large numbers of Jews
in the Christian Science ranks.
Then came the more realistic per-
ception, the assumption of the bur-
den that became hers as a Jewess:
"I begin to feel it lightened . . .
imperceptibly, but it is enough,"
with a new light and the reciting
of the "Shema," which appears in
Hebrew on the closing page of the
novel.

NY Students Plan
Intensified Drive on
Soviet Persecution

NEW YORK (JTA)—Plans for
an intensified campaign "of infor-
mation and action," to involve
every college campus in the New
York area, in protest against per-
secution of Jews in the USSR,
will be formulated by a new or-
ganization, Students Struggle for
Soviet Jewry, which massed 1,000
pickets last weekend near the So-
viet Embassy in New York.
The announcement was made
by James Birnbaum, coordinator
of the movement, who said the pro-
tests against the Soviet anti-Jewish
persecutions had developed spon-
taeously on 13 college campuses
whose students were among the
USSR Embassy pickets. College
and universities represented, he
said, included Columbia, Hunter,
Barnard, Brooklyn, City, Queens,
Yeshiva University and Jewish
Theological Seminary.
The students, he said, will de-
velop plans for further "dramatic"
action against Soviet anti-Semitism,
and will acquaint students in all
summer camps this year with the
religious and cultural oppressions
suffered by Jews in the USSR.

ONT
BART,
_
O

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pects of Judaic humanism. Left
now of Torah and Talmud are
the universal contents only—the
third that deals with morality,
justice, and ethics. Does this
progression suggest that Judaism
is now prepared to proselytize
its faith in a world ready to ac-
cept its prophetic message? Is
this to be the destiny of the
Jews in the third act?

If man views the Jewish
achievement through material-
istic eyes, seeing only an insig-
nificant minority in possession
of a little land and a few bat-
talions, this will seem improb-
able. It will not seem improb-
able if man discards the blinkers
of prejudice and views the world
not as a "think" but as an

two thirds of the civilized world
is already governed by the ideas
of Jews — the ideas of Moses,
Jesus, Paul, Spinoza, Marx,
Freud, Einstein. Will the world
in the next 2,000 years embrace
the morality of the Torah, the
social justice of the Prophets,
the ethics of the Jewish patri-
archs? If so, then in the words
of Isaiah, there will be "Peace,
peace, to him that is far off and
to him that is near."

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Do only vegetarians eat
Heinz Vegetarian Beans?



Dr. Prinz Honored
in Johnson Message

NEWARK — President Lyndon
B. Johnson, in a personal message
to Dr. Joachim Prinz, has hailed
the Jewish leader on his 25th an-
niversary as rabbi of Temple Bnai
Abraham here.
President Johnson's message
was read at a ball attended by 600
congregation members and com-
munity leaders marking Dr. Prinz's
silver jubilee with the temple.
"As you are honored by Temple
Bnai Abraham of Newark . for your
25 years of dedicated service as
spiritual leader of this syna-
gogue," President Johnson wrote,
"I am pleased to join your many
friends and admirers in extending
to you heartiest congratulations
and greetings.
"Your valiant and devoted ef-
forts to promote the cause of
social justice in our blessed land
have won for you the praise of
all Americans. I am proud to add
my voice to that of those who pay
tribute today to your many fine
accomplishments.
"In the years ahead, I wish you
the happiness and satisfaction
which are so rightfully yours."

MATO SAUC

. .

ge.4

ter,

V s6-14-

lilt tt ta,mrsouggt

••

to, f.cssct.piesk

NEW YORK, (JTA) — The ap-
pointment of Nahum Shamir as
Israel's Economic Minister to the
Embassy of Israel in Washington,
was announced by Avraham Har-
man, Israel's Ambassador to this
country. Shamir assumes his new
position effective immediately, suc-
ceeding Ambassador Aryeh Manor,
who held the post for the past six
years.
Shamir will head Israel's eco-
nomic offices in the United States,
whose headquarters in New York
include the Government of Israel
Investment Authority, the Office
of the Israel Trade Commissioner,
and the Israel Supply Mission.

No.Octogenarians also. Doctors,too.
And steam fitters, assista nt coat buyers,
folk singers, house painters, cutters &
sorcerer's apprentices, forest rangers,
well diggers, second violinists, scout-
masters, insurance claim adjusters
and psychiatric social workers.
Everyone, in fact, who likes a tasty,
inexpensive, nourishing vegetarian dish
that goes fine with meat, fish, poultry
...or all by itself.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
Friday, May 15, 1964
13

KOSHER AND PAREVE•THE HEINZ VEGETARIAN HEAN5 LABEL SEARS THE 40 SEAL OF UMW"
OF THE UNION OF ORTHODOX JEWISH CONaRECATIONS OF AMERICA

Orr take advantage of our small
family offer. Buy a pound of
Barton's real Swiss Milk Choc-
date, (straight from our facto-
ries in Lugano, Switzerland) for
$1.75 and we'll give you an extra
half-pound—free. (And hurry. Nahum Shamir Appointed
This offer ends May 25)
Israel Economic Minister

AGENCY

Max I. Dimont, reviewed in these
columns when it first was publish-
ed in 1962 in a hardcover edition
by Simon and Schuster, has been
issued in a paperback, as a Signet
Classic of New American Library
of World Literature (501 Madison,
NY 22).
It was while lecturing on Jewish
history, in 1956, that the author
realized that he was re-echoing old
themes. Thereupon he threw away
his manuscript and began to lec-
ture on cultural aspects of Jewish
existence during the milennia.
Then he wrote his text, from
memory.
The study is quite thorough, and
this conclusion is especially note-
worthy. The author asserts:
Throughout the centuries, the
trinity of Jehovah, Torah, and
Prophets, by accident or design
evolved two sets of laws, one to
preserve the Jews as Jews, the
other to preserve mankind. In
their first 2,000 years, the Jews
used that third of the Torah and
Talmud which deals with priest-
hood and sacrifice to maintain
themselves as a Jewish entity in
a world of pagan civilizations.
In their second 2,000 years, they
used that third of Torah and
Talmud which deals with ritual
and . dietary restrictions to main-
tain their ethnic unity even as

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