100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

August 31, 1962 - Image 24

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1962-08-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Extradition, Not Deportation
Orders Issued for Artukovic

The Department of Justice
has extradition but not deporta-
tion orders against Andrija
Artukovic, the Yugoslavian who
is accused of responsibility for
Nazi crimes in Yugoslavia, Saul
Karpf of 15866 Woodingham
was informed.
Under date of Aug. 6, R. C.
Haberstroh, Acting District Di-
rector of the United States De-
partment of Justice Immigra-
tion and Naturalization Service
in Los Angeles, wrote to Karpf:
"Your letter addressed to the
Attorney General has been for-
warded to this office for reply
because we have custody of the
relating record, and jurisdiction
over the immigration case of
Mr. Andrija Artukovic.
"This Service has had a final
order for Mr. Artukovic's de-
portation since April 1953.
From then until January 15,
1959, extradition proceedings
were pending against him in
the Federal courts and action
was necessarily deferred in his
deportation case. Although ex-
tradition proceedings are not
under the jurisdiction of this
Service, those proceedings have
had an important bearing on
the progress of this case.
"T h e U.S. Commissioner,
U.S. District Court, Southern
District of California, Central
Division, on January 15, 1959,
found that the crimes charged
against Mr. Artukovic in extra-
dition proceedings were of a
political character and that he
was not extraditable. On May
22, 1959, our regional commis-
sioner at San Pedro, California,
granted Mr. Artukovic's appli-
cation for a withholding of his
deportation to Yugoslavia based

New cultural attractions in Is-
rael include Monday evening
dance performances • in Jerusa-
lem's Rose Garden and the
varied schedule at the Haifa
Theater. Some of the works to
be offered this season are by
Sophocles„ Shakespeare, Bren-
dan Behan and Andre Gide.

49th SemiAnnual
REDFORD-DETROIT

22521 Grand River Ave.

(between Lahser and Telegraph)

VE

FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
SEPT.
7 - 8 - 9

Adm. 75c

HOURS 12-10

26 Leading Exhibitors
All For Sale

Northwest Detroit Likes this Show

Jewish Meats

By Mildred Grosberg Bellin

upon his claim that he would be
physically persecuted in that
country.
"This Service has continued
its efforts to obtain a travel
document for deportation to
some other country, but to date
has been unsuccessful."

Anna Langfus'
Novel Describes
War Sufferings

"The Whole Land Brimstone",
the title for the novel by Anna
Langfus, published by Pantheon
Books (22 E. 51st, NY 22), is
taken from Deuteronomy XXIX-
23: "And that the whole land
thereof is brimstone, and salt,
and burning . . . "
It is an appropriate selection,
since the novel deals with the
Nazi holocaust, with the destruc-
tion of Poland, with the German
invasion, the horrors that were
imposed upon the land, the wan-
derings that ensued.
It is a biographical novel, and
to understand fully the deeply
moving contents, it is necessary
to know the background of the
author.
Born in Lublin, Poland, in 1920,
Anna Langfus had some of her
writings published at the age of
15. She was married at 17, lived
with her husband for a while in
Belgium, where both studied,
and while they were on a visit
in Poland they were trapped
there by the war. Her parents
and her husband were murdered
in 1941. She was arrested numer-
ous times while serving with the
resistance forces and was a pris-
oner of the Gestapo until the
end of the war. Since 1946 she
has lived in France where she
is engaged in writing.
Thus, it is her personal exper-
iences that are responsible for
the dramatic events described
in this novel. The story begins
as the bombs began to fall on
Warsaw. It relates how compla-
cent the characters were at first.
It was unbelievable that real ter-
rorism was to ensue. Then it
commenced.
The hardships and the flights,
the accusations against Maria
and Jan, the couple autobio,gaph-
ically depicted in the novel, that
they were Russian spies, the in-
sistence upon life against all
hardships—these and scores of
other experiences are dramatic-
ally related, and "The Whole
Land Brimstone" emerges as an-
other good addition to the works
describing the terroism in Po-
land under Nazi rule.

AMERICA'S Most Popular MENU

Eat 'Em in Your Car

Or

Take 'Em Home

Ip

100% PURE BEEF HAMBURGER
CREAMY CHEESEBURGER
MELTED CHEESE SANDWICH
HOT FISH SANDWICH
HOT DOG (ALL MEAT)
CRISPY FRENCH FRIES
CRISPY ONION RINGS
FISH BOAT
SHRIMP BOAT
COKE
ORANGE
ROOT BEER
COFFEE
SUPER MILK SHAKES
MALTS
MILK
1 /2 CHICKEN-ROLL-F.F.-SLAW
DEEP FRIED BREADED
FAN TAIL SHRIMP, 1 LB.
or FILET OF HADDOCK, 1 LB.

.

15c
19c
19c
29c
22c
10c
25c
58c
72c
10c - 15c
10c - 15c
10c - 15c
10c - 15c
20c
25c
12c
$1.19

$1.85
$1.35

HENRY'S DRIVE-IN

22040 W. 7 MILE, near Lahser
11635 GREENFIELD, near Plymouth

• AMPLE PARKING

• FAST SERVICE

KE 4-9528
VE 5-9758

• NO TIPPING

(Copyright, 1962,
Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Inc.)

One reason why broiled liver
may lack appeal is that it was
cut too thin. Try having the
butcher slice it at least an inch
thick, and if you can beguile
him into giving you the center
slices, so much the better. Broil
the meat and remove the mem-
branes. These thicker slices are
so much more tender, juicy, and
flavorsome that you may find
that your family enjoys them
just as they come from the
broiler. Or you may like to add
the sauteed onions, or perhaps
top the meat with a canned to-
mato and mushroom sauce.
The flavor of curry blends
well with liver too. Try a sauce
made by cooking 2 tablespoons
of chicken fat with 2 table-
spoons of flour until they bub-
ble. Then stir in 1 cup of hot
Chicken soup, and salt, pepper,
and curry powder to taste. One
teaspoonful of curry powder
should be enough. Dice a pound
of broiled liver and add. Serve
to three or four as soon as the
meat is hot. This dish is espe-
cially good over rice.
Cut-up pieces or strips of
broiled liver are also used with
the two sauces suggested below.

LIVER ORIENTALE
1 lb. calf's liver, one inch thick
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon dry sherry
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1 /4 cup water
6 scallions, green and white part,
sliced thin
1/2 teaspoon pepper
Broil the liver and cut into 1/4-inch
strips. Cut each strip about 2 inches
long. Combine the remaining ingredi-
ents in a skillet large enough to hold
the meat. Stir over medium heat until
the sauce comes to a boil. Add the
liver, and serve as soon as it is thor-
oughly heated. This amount of sauce
just coats the meat. If preferred,
twice as much sauce may be made
and the mixture served over rice or
fried noodles. The recipe serves 3 or 4.
LIVER FINANCIER
2 tablespoons browned flour
1 lb. calf's liver, one inch thick
1 4-oz. can sliced mushrooms
About 3/4 cup chicken soup
2 tablespoons salad oil
1 bay leaf
1/16 teaspoon ground thyme
2 tablespoons Sauterne
1 /4 cup sliced, stuffed green olives
Salt and pepper to taste
Prepare the browned flour by plac-
ing 3 tablespoons of all-purpose flour
in a heavy skillet over medium heat.
Stir constantly until the flour turns
a rich amber color. Scrape the bottom
as you stir, so that the flour cooks
evenly. Measure again before using in
the recipe. This may be prepared in
advance and stored in a covered jar.
Broil the liver, remove the mem-
brane, and cut the meat into bite-
sized pieces. Drain the mushrooms,
measure the liquid, and add enough
chicken soup to make one cup. In a
saucepan blend the browned flour and
oil over medium heat until bubbling.
Remove from the heat and stir in the
soup mixture. Blend, and return to
the heat. Add the bay leaf and thyme,
and stir for 5 minutes. Remove the
bay leaf. Add the wine, liver, mush-
rooms, and olives, and stir gently
until very hot. Add salt and pepper
to taste. This blends well with mashed
potatoes and green vegetables. The
recipe serves 4.

Michelangelo's Letters
"When I decided that the next
book I would write would be a
long-thought-about biographical
novel of Michelangelo, I learned
that although there were already
some twenty-five hundred books,
monographs and articles pub-
lished about this archetype of
the artist, in most of the lang-
uages of the world, no one had
ever translated into English the
body of nearly five hundred
letters written by Michelangelo
Buonarroti, all of them fastidi-
ously preserved." So writes
Irving Stone in his Introduction
to the collected letters of Michel-
angelo, "I, Michelangelo, Sculp-
tor: An autobiography through
letters."
Edited by Irving Stone and
his wife, Jean Stone, "I, Mich-
elangelo, Sculptor," published by
Doubleday, is the first complete
edition of Michelangelo's letters
to be published in English. In
chronological order, they report
his activities, his thoughts and
feelings from the first, written
in 1496 when he was 21, to the
last known letter, dated Dec. 28,
1563, just a short time before
his death. The book includes
reproductions of 17 of Michel-
angelo's works, and his sonnets,
from the faithful John Adding-
ton Symonds translation, first
published in the 1870s.

Michigan Jews in Civil War Exhibit
on Display at Sheraton-Cadillac

In connection with the Na-
tional convention of the Jewish
War Veterans in Detroit, a spe-
cial exhibit of material on the
participation of Michigan Jews
in the Civil War is on display
in the Ballroom floor of the
Sheraton-Cadillac Hotel.
Also featured in this exhibit
is a selection of material on the
first Jewish chaplains in the
United States whose 100th an-
niversary is being commemor-
ated this year.

Another feature of the exhibit
pertains to Lt. Raymond Zuss-
man, the Congressional Medal of
Honor winner from Michigan
during World War II.
The exhibit is being arranged
by Irving I. Katz, executive sec•
retary of Temple Beth El and
president of the Jewish Histori-
cal Society of Michigan. The ma-
terial comes from his extensive
collection on Michigan Jewish
history.
Katz is the author of "The
New Brandeis Program
Jewish soldier From Michigan in
In Israel Gets Assist
the Civil War," recently pub-
From State Department
lished by the Wayne State Uni-
A $25,000 grant from the versity Press.
U.S. State Department will help
underwrite a Brandeis Univer-
sity program that is giving stu-
ROCKY'S PIZZERIA
dents from seven American col-
10517 W. 7 MILE RD.

leges and universities a first-
BAR-B-Q RIBS, CHICKEN,
hand knowledge of Israel.
PIZZA, SPAGHETTI
The federal grant was made
OPEN 7 DAYS • WE DELIVER
available in counterpart funds UN 4-8553
864-9784
to the University's Jacob Hiatt
Institute in Israel, inaugurated
last year for the study of that
country's political, social and
Dinner at DARBY'S
historical institutions.
is a real treat
The Institute, whose 1961
• Visit Our New
class consisted of 13 Brandeis
SKYLIGHT
ROOM, Cocktail
students, opened in Jerusalem
Lounge and Bar
this year to eligible junior stu-
• AFTER
dents from all of the nation's
THEATRE
colleges and universities.
Snacks . . . a

ENNINIMMINI•n 1110 ■0■ 0411111-01111.11•Ilin ■ ••11•0 ■ Men

1

Delight
LUNCHEON
A Pleasure

COMING

SEPTEMBER 7 11i

NEWS FROM

Res. UN 2-7642

RONALD SLOAN

SEVEN MILE at WYOMING

P.•• ■ •44 ■ •••••Na 0 ■ 01•111•11 ■ 0•1•111•Oitr ■ U

o••seeee•ee•so••emeow••e••eli

• •


• • •
• • • •

• •
• •
• •
• • •
• •
• •
• •
• • •
• •

• • •
• •
• •
•--
• •
• •
• • •
• •
• • •
• •
• •
• •
• •
• • •
• •
• • •
• •
• •
• •
• •
• •
• •
• •
• •
• •
• •
• •
• •
• •
• •


AUGUST
FESTIVAL

• • •
• •

ALL DURING
AUGUST AT

••

•1

rectum' s

EVERY DAY OR EVENING

•■■•■••■••11.

Seven Mile, Just West of Livernois

OPEN DAILY

• DI 1-5445 •

a.

SATURDAY to 2 A.M.; SUNDAYS 2-10 P.M.

* YOUR FAVORITES *

All

You Can Eat!

SPAGHETTI or
MUSTACCIOLI
LASAGNA
IMBOTITA ....
CHICKEN
CACCIATORE
CHICKEN
PARMIGIANA

100

125

.

■ I•

225

Miraflore Chianti Classico

(Imported from Italy)
Full Quart—with
or without dinner

NOW . . .
ALL STEAKS and CHOPS
FROM OUR NEW CHAR-
COAL BROILER !

295

PRIVATE ROOMS AVAILABLE
FOR:
• BAR MITZVAHS • SWEET
16 PARTIES • SHOWERS and
• ALL SOCIAL FUNCTIONS



• •
1:
S
• • .

• •
• •

• • •

• •



• •
• •
• •
• •
• •
• •
• •
• •
• •
• •

• • •
• •
• •

• •
• •
• •
• •
• •


• • •
• • •



•' •

0:
•!
•:
S.
0;
•S.
•i



: PIANO BAR - COCKTAIL HOUR AND NITELY


DANCING—THURS., FRI. & SAT.


I: Buffet Dinner Every Wednesday 6:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.


Bring Your Family or Make Up a Party !

• • •••et•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••ot • •

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan