100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

July 07, 1961 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1961-07-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Battle for Foreign Aid Clause Barrin

(Continued from Page 1)
In Fulbright'S view, the meas-
ure served no other purpose
than to mollify domestic polit-
ical considerations detrimental
to American objectives abroad.
The passage facing elimination
was a declaration supporting
"freedom of navigation in inter-
national waterways, and recog-
nition of the right of all private
persons to travel and pursue
their lawful activities without
discrimination as to race or re-
ligion."
This was contained in a pre-
amble to the operative parts of
the bill and replaced a stronger
anti-discrimination measure con-
tained in the last Mutual Security
Appropriations Act. It would re-
place Section 108 of legislation
for the fiscal year ending June
30.
Section 108, adopted last year,
was never implemented because
the Executive Department, under
both Administrations, did not
see fit to use the authority pro-
vided. The section said "it is the
-sense of Congress that any at-
tempt by foreign nations to cre-
ate distinctions because of their
race or religion among American
citizens in the granting of per-
sonal or commercial access or
any other rights otherwise avail-
able to U-.S. citizens generally,
is repugnant to our principles;
and in all negotiations between
the United States and foreign
states arising as a result of funds
appropriated under this title,
these principles shall be applied
as the President may determine."
Citing the barring by Saudi
Arabia of Rep. Seymour Hal-
pern, New York Republican,
as "the most flagrant recent.
i n s t a n.c e of discrimination
against an American citizen by
a country which is the recip-
ient of American aid," Sena-
tor Kenneth Keating, of New
York, questioned whether the
Executive Department w a s
doing enough to protect the
rights of American -Jews
abroad. Keating made his
views known in a statement
to the Senate Foreign Rela-
tions Committee.
Commenting on the AdMin-
istration's new request for for-

eign aid funds, he called on the
Executive Department to imple-
ment the previously expressed
sense of Congress asking sev-
erance of aid to nations that
discriminate through boycotts
and blockades.
Keating said the Administra-
tion's new bill contained in
its preamble "a watered-down,
weakened version of the Douilas-
Keating Amendment." He raised
a question of why the Executive
Department did not use existing
authority to sever Arab aid and
whether the new provision would
be enforced.
Referring to Halpern, Keating
said "a Congressman who the
Administration is asking to pro-
vide money for foreign aid and
other assistance projects in
Saudi Arabia, is being barred
from that country. Before ad-
ditional aid is granted to the
Arabs," he said, "guarantees
should be received that Amer-
ican citizens will be permitted t
use the air terminals and oth
facilities built with Ameri
funds. That is the very
'st
which the United States c
do
in its role as the defend
of
individual liberties and
an
dignity throughout the
rid."
Keating said "the
tate
Department seems mor
on-
cerned to evade res
si-
bility for supporting
leans and American concerns
. . . than it is to exercise it
. the Arab boycott is a clear
effort to blackmail all nations
of the world . . . the next
step, if Nasser wants to follow
the example of his counter-
part, • Castro, is to demand a
tractor for every shipload of
goods for Israel that is al-
lowed through the Suez Canal
or for every refugee that is
settled on Arab soil."
The New York Senator said
also that "there is continuous
documented proof" that Amer-
ican ships are being affected by
the Arab boydott although the
State Department shirks this
problem. He cited the case of
the U.S. freighter "Valiant
Faith!' He said "the Egyptians
held up this freightekr in Port
Said . . . denied its Orew shore
leave, leaving them, in effect,

Yaacov Sharett, Israeli Embassy
Official in Moscow, Expelled by
Soviet Union on Espionage Charge

COPENHAGEN, (JTA) —
Yaacov Sharett, First Secretary
of the Israeli Embassy at Mos-
cow, who was ousted by the
Soviet government, accused the
USSR on his arrival here July
1, on his way home to Jerusa-
lem, of trumping up . "a fake
espionage charge" against him.
Sharett said that he and his
wife were arrested last Thurs-
day, at Riga. He stated that both
he and Mrs. Sharett had been
"handled roughly by the Rus-
sian police.
In announcing his ouster,
Tass, the official Soviet news
agency, had declared that the
Israeli diplomat had been
"caught red-handed in espion-
age."
Yaacov Sharett is a son of
Moshe Sharett, Israel's erst-
while Prime Minister, who was
the government's Foreign Min-
ister for a number of years.
Israel Says Ouster -Is `Flagrant
Violation' by Red Secret Police
JERUSALEM, (JTA) — The
Israel Foreign Ministry de-
nounced the expulsion of Yaacov
Sharett by the Soviet Union as
"a case of flagrant provocation
by the secret police."
The Foreign Ministry de-
scribed the Tass statement as
"a tissue of falsehoods from be-
ginning to end. Neither this
Israeli diplomat nor any other
Israeli diplomat has ever en-
gaged in espionage or dissem-
ination of anti-Soviet material
in the Soviet Union.

"This is a case of flagrant
provocation by the secret po-
lice," the Foreign Ministry as-
serted. The statement added
that "the propaganda aims" o
the Tass report "are obviou
and it is unlikely to dece
anyone."

Israel Supreme Cou
Upholds Conviction
of Sitte, Scientist-S

JERUSALEM, (JTA) —
Supreme Court of Israel u
mously upheld the convic
of Prof. Kurt Sitte, 51, in
nationally known expert on co
mic radiation, on three counts
of espionage 'against Israel.
It dismissed a fourth count
on which the Czechoslovak-born
scientist had been convicted in
Haifa District Court. All charges
involved 'transmittal of secret
information to an unidentified
foreign power from 1955 to
1957. -3,
Sitte was head of the physics
department of the Haifa Insti-
tute of Technology and deputy
to the director of its research
department. His trial was held
in complete secrecy. Prior to
settling in Israel some years
ago, Sitte, who is not Jewish,
'had lectured in British and
American universities. While in
prison, it was said Sitte has
been permitted to keep a large
scientific library, continuing re-
search work on non-security
matters.

imprisoned on the ship for 28•
days."
Halpern told Secretary of
State Dean Rusk that the State
Department's position on di
crimination against Ameri
citizens of the Jewish fait .y
Saudi Arabia was "indicat'
of
a tendency of appease ent."
The effect, he asserted,
the
translation of Arab bia into
United States discrimi
on
among its own citizens, offs
and employees."
The New York Congress-
man's charges came in a let-
ter replying to a communica-,
tion from the State Depart-
ment dealing with the
of Saudi Israel to
visa for a
er . _at the
Dhahran
e. The letter,
signed
rooks Hays, Assist-
ant
etary of State, aid
t
s long as the Ara e-ra
'et conti el
ates "will
entry to pe
strongly sup
Israel. Rig
they view
ch
inimical to
eir
in-
terests."
The State Depar
nt official,
dealing with H
rn's question
as to why
ion 108 of the
Mutual
ity Act had not
bee ' 0 ed, said that "discrim-
on is a worldwide problem,
and is scarcely likely to be elim-
inated by pressure or coercion."
The clause gives the President
discretionary power to withhold
Mutual Security aid from a coun-
try discriminating against Amer-
ican citizens because of their
race or religion.
"What is required," said Hays,
"is persistent, patient persuasion
which will, hopefully ultimately
break down such disturbing
practices."
Alluding to the State Depart-
ment reference to the Arab posi-
tion that a visit such as his might
be 'inimical to their security
interests," Halpern said: "I
find such reasoning a gratuitous
insult to my patriotism as an
American citizen, and certainly
will insist that the Department
defend my rights to travel freely
abroad in any nation receiving
U.S. assistance, on a basis of
equality with any other Amer-
ican citizen. I hereby formally
request the Department of State
to assist me in.. obta• •
necessary visa fo
plated private
expense."
Hal
said: "My work
and
ivate travel are those
of n American. They have
thing to do with my per-
sonal faith, and I am s
that the Department
vinced that it w uld
sure and coe
put it,
Amer'
tions
bene g
ssistance
programs."
Halpern
me•
"ptzzl .
that the St
Departure
ol-
icy differe from tha
oiced
by R. Sargent Shriver r., head
of the Peace Corps
o told the
Senate Foreign
ations Com-
mittee that
e Peace Corps
sist nations that dis-
cri a ed against its personnel
on grounds of race or religion.
Halpern said "the evasive and
equivocal stand of the State.
Department is in sharp contrast
to that of Mr. Shriver. I can see
no reason, if the Peace Corps
can effectively insist on defend-
ing the religious and racial
rights of its personnel, why the
State Department cannot imple-
ment the same policy."
He said there had been wide
criticism of the United States'
failure to challenge discrimina-
tion by foreign governments
against American citizens and
"failure ,to insist that all our
citizens are entitled to equal
protection."
His committee was "gratified
when Peace Corps director ..R.
Sargent Shriver, Jr., announced
that the Peace. Corps would not

ab Bias

go into cs
ies that discrimi- cons
and reaaffirm the posi-
nate."
cause the Peace Corps tion C gress has taken on this
st
is consistent "with Amer- issue
the past."
's best traditions," Ra i Bern-
stein said, "it is all t
EARN TO DRIVE
grettable ther
Full Hour $36
the clause
Lessons
Professional
Dual
the Senate
Instructors
Controls
Committee."
SAFEWAY
Bernstei
ope that
DRIVER TRAINING -
TO 9-7600 — LI 2-6742
the Sen•
ittee "will re-

6

SPECIAL!

Full Size 1961

CHRYSLER
$2964
VALIANTS

AS LOW AS

$1895

Barney Teal

Gen. Mgr.

Big Allowance On Your Car

LEO ADLER

Authorized Imperial, Chrysler, Plymouth & Valiant
OUR NEW LOCATION-18500 LIVERNOIS

Below 7 Mile

DI 1-7000

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan