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January 27, 1961 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1961-01-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

$1,884,822 in Advance Gifts Mark
Encouraging Start for 1961 Drive

Gen. Laskov, Zuckerman,
Rabbi Friedman Inspire
in Campaign for $5,500,000

N

Inspired by addresses by General Chaim Laskov,
former Chief of Staff of the Army of Israel, Rabbi
Herbert A. Friedman, executive vice president of
the United Jewish Appeal, Paul Zuckerman, chair-
man of the 1961 Allied Jewish Campaign, pre-cam-
paign workers in the Detroit drive, who became
known as "The Pace-Setters," pledged $1,884,822, at
the initial campaign meeting, Tuesday evening, at
the home of Mr. and Mrs. C. William Sucher, 1500
Balmoral.
Isidore Sobeloff, executive vice president of the
Jewish Welfare Federation, who announced the
record-setting initial campaign total, stated that while
the drive officially is scheduled to commence on
March 22, the generosity shown at the traditional
"Sucher meeting" points to success in the drive.
Zuckerman, whose efforts as the 1961 campaign
chairman were in great measure responsible for
mobilization of forces for the commencement of the
pre-campaign activities, assumed leadership in the
drive at Tuesday's meeting with an effective plea for
serious work to assure reaching the $5,500,000 goal
that was set for this year's campaign at the recent
budgeting conference.

Brief addresses at Tuesday's meeting were
delivered also by Max M. Fisher, president of the
Federation, Charles Gershenson, Phillip Stollman,
John Lurie and several other active campaign
leaders.
Welcoming the gathering to the eighth "Sucher
Meeting," Zuckerman described it as a "perennial
pilgrimage." He pointed out that while the largest
previous attendance at a Sucher meeting was 88,
there were 108 men at Tuesday's gathering.

(Continued on Page 32)

United States
of America

Vol. 107

THE JEWISH NEWS

-

FR CD I 7"

A Weekly Review

MIC. I—IIGANI

f Jewish Events

Michigan's Only English-Jewish Ne, .goa per, Incorporating The Jewish Chronicle

17100 W. 7 Mile Rd., Detroit 35

VOL. XXXVI I I—No. 22

January 27, 1961

Kennedy's Inauguration
Ushers in Era of Hope
for Peace for Mankind

By PHILIP SLOMOVITZ

WASHINGTON, D. C. The cosmopolitanism of America, the genius of the United
States that has developed out of the fusion of the many races into one great entity—
the glory of a nation that "gives to bigotry no sanction" and grants the right to un-
trammeled worship to all faiths—were in evidence here last week-end, as the world
watched with keen interest the inauguration of the 35th President of the United
States.
Four faiths were represented at the inauguration of John Fitzgerald Kennedy,
and Scriptural lore was quoted to emphasize the urgency of the issues which con-
front our new President and the faith that is derived from Biblical admonitions.
When the oath of office was administered by Chief Justice Earl Warren, the
President-elect rested his hand on the family Bible—the Douay 16th century Eng-
lish translation for Catholics. Unlike most of his predecessors, he did not have the
Bible opened to a preferred passage. He did, however, incorporate in his address a
quotation from Isaiah. With emphasis on the world situation and foreign affairs,
in his discussion of his aims for world peace, President Kenned3i admonished the totali-
tarians that "civility is not a sign of weakness, . and sincerity is always subject to
proof." He then declared:
"Let both sides unite to heed in all corners of the earth the command of
Isaiah—to 'undo the heavy 'burdens . . . (and) let the oppressed go free.' . "



.

(Continued on Page 3)

Tongressionat 'Record

PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE

rryrr

.7 th CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION

Q

WASHINGTON, MONDAY, JANUARY 16, 1961

No. 10

They ask of Me righteous ordi-
nances
They delight to draw near unto God. ,

, 11*97: m7.5ti n;-.17

ci* 4 4171i1pN ntt 3

-

Senate

The Senate was not in session today. Its next meeting will be held on Tuesday,'January 17, 1961, at 12 o'clock meridian.

House of Representatives

MONDAY, JANUARY 16, 1961

nYi rito

nxtni

n,'? inn

Isaiah 11: 9.
When "the earth shall be filled with
the knowledge of the Lord, as the we.-
. ters that cover the sea."



THE JOURNAL
'The Journal of the proceedings of
Thursday, January 12, 1961, was read
and approved.

MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT
A message in writing from the Pres-
!dent of the United States was communi-
cated to the House by Mr. Miller, one of
his secretaries.

/77

vo-IN*rP171 b;P' *

4

I Mit1 9t;

:n`?iP al- R; Pf9Yrf?
Mr. HALLECK. Reserving the right
to object, Mr. Speaker, I had assumed
that the legislative business would be
first in order for today and the speeches
would come on later. Would the read-
ing of the President's budget message be
the first order of business today?
Mr. McCORMACK. After the dispo-
sition of this bill.
Mr. HALLECK. It is expected that
the gentleman from Missouri will make
his speech after the President's message
is read?
Mr. McCORMACK. Yes. I made the
request at the request of the gentleman
from Missouri.
Mr. HALLECK. I understand that.
Would his request then precede the other
orders that have been entered for today
relating to Members who died after the
adjournment of the last Congress?
The SPEAKER. The Chair will rec-
ognize all Members who desire to address
the House after the President's message
has been read and the remarks of the
gentleman from Missouri have been
completed.
Mr. HALLECK. I withdraw my reser-
upon the conclusion of the ceremonies the vation of objection, Mr. Speaker,
House stand .agapurned until Monday, An-
The SPEAKER. Is there objection to
utuy 23, 1961. '''s '
the request of the gentleman from Mas-
sachusetts?
The resolution was agreed to.
There was no objection.
A motion to reconsider was laid on the
table.
EXEMPTING OFFICIAL INAUGURAL
PERMISSION TO ADDRESS THE
FUNCTIONS AND MEDALLIONS
HOUSE
FROM FEDERAL EXCISE TAX
Mr. McCORMACK. Mr. Speaker,
Mr. McCORMACK. Mr. Speaker, I
ask unanimous consent that --,rnediately
the
qnd r- •
to
yr
following the reari;•
1089
sage from the
States the gentle-
Reproduced page from Congressional Record, on the left, shows use, for the first time in American
CANNON] may
history, of Hebrew characters in the official record of the House of Representatives. The page on
the House for
The SPEAKE.
the right is reproduced from the Jewish Publication Society Holy Scriptures. It contains the Yom
the request of th,
Kippur Haftarah whence President John F. Kennedy took his selection—from Isaiah 58.6—incor-
sachusetts?

The House met at 12 o'clock noon.
ADJOURNMENT UNTIL WEDNESDAY .
Rabbi Arnold S. Turetsky, Congrega-
NEXT
tion °hey Tzedek, Youngstown, Ohio,
Mr. McCORMACK. Mr. Speaker, I
offered the following prayer:
ask
unanimous
consent
that when the
Eternal God, Father of all men, bless
adjourns today it adjourn to meet
us with wisdom and courage to be Thine House
on
Wednesday
next.
instruments in the creation of a free
The SPEAKER. Is there objection to
world, wherein none shall be master and
request of the gentleman from Mas-
none shall be slave, wherein all shall the
sachusetts?
share the blessings of freedom.
There
was no objection.
Make us free, too, 0 God, that we may
fulfill our mission.
Make us free from smugness and cold ADJOURNMENT FROM WEDNESDAY
indifference.
UNTIL FRIDAY NEXT, AND FROM
Free from pride and the abuse of
FRIDAY TO MONDAY NEXT
power.
Mr. McCORMACK. Mr. Speaker, I
Free from pettiness and unreasonable
offer
a resolution (H. Res. 106) and ask
Stubbornness.
Free from the sometimes poison of for its immediate consideration.
The Clerk read the resolution, as
"blind partisanship and self-interest.
Free from prejudice and colorblind- follows:
Resolved, That when the House adjourns
ness. '
January 18, 1981, It stand
Free from all that is debasing in life, on Wednesday,
until 11 a.m. Friday, January 20,
that we may never lose the vision of adjourned
19e1; that upon convening at that hour the
that day when weakness shall grow House proceed to the east front of the Cap-
strong, and strength shall grow kind, itol for the purpose of attending the in-
and all men shall know themselves as the augural ceremonies of the President and Vice
sons of God.
President of the United States: and that

in nx

'`Wherefore have we fasted, and
Thou seest not?
Wherefore have we afflicted our
soul, and Thou takest no knowl-
edge?'—
Behold, in the day of your fast ye
pursue your business,
And exact all your labours.
'Behold, ye fast for strife and con-
tention,
And to smite with the fist of wicked-
ness;
Ye fast not this day
.So as to make your voice to be
heard on high.
'Is such the fast that I have chosen?
The day for a man to afflict his
soul?
Is it to bow down his head as a bul-
rush,
And to spread sackcloth and ashes
under him?
Wilt thou call this a fast,
And an acceptable day to the
Loan?
6 Is not this the fast that I have
chosen?
To loose the fetters of wickedness,
To undo the bands of the yoke,
And to let the oppressed go: free;.
And that ye break every yoke?
-
'Is it not to deal thy bread to the
hungry,
And that thou bring the poor that
are cast out to thy house?
When thou seest the naked, that
thou cover him,
And that thou hide not thyself
from thine own flesh?
8 Then shall thy light break forth
as the morning,
And thy healing shall spring forth.
speedily;

porated in his inaugural address.

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