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September 09, 1960 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1960-09-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

(Continued from Page 1)
the two men.

Sgt. Harry Epstein, a former
New Yorker who settled in Ari-
zona, was Pershing's war-time
mess sergeant.
Up to World War II, General
Pershing had under his command
the largest body of Jewish sol-
diers of all time. Serving under
him in France during World War
I were more than 150,000 Ameri-
can Jews whose religious and
morale needs brought intc being
the National Jewish Welfare
Board in 1917.
Responding to a Rosh Hash-
anah greeting in 1917 from Col.
Harry Cutler, then president of
JWB, Pershing cabled these
words: "The stirring message
greetings from the Nat'
ish Welfare Boar •
preciated by
rican Ex-
peditiona
. The constant
support
• rdial assistance of
our
of the Jewish faith
a
ought that all creed's
ed under one banner
ourage to our
an
s on to vict

he close of
•rld
official mes--.g o
ex-
, General P .
• to J
praise for

MURRY
KOBLIN
ADVER
TISING
ART

18039 WYOMING
UN. 1 5600

-

"the splendid services" American
Jewry had rendered through
JWB to the AEF. In that mess-
age Pershing said "the activities
of your organization in France
commenced in the summer of
1918, with the opening of a club-
room in Paris to which American
soldiers, irrespective of creed,
were welcomed. Handicapped by
lack of personnel and facilities,
your representatives, during the
remaining months of hostilities,
did valuable work among the sol-
diers of the Jewish faith and
others, taking advantage of the
opportunities offered by the
larger welfare agencies to keep
our soldiers in touch with their
religion and their homes."
• • • ing's appraisal of the
ng men under his
mand an his vigorous sup-
por •f Jewish econstruction in
Europe were
post- rld War
ow forgotten
expressed in a
Dec. 5, 1926,
speech he made
ting of Catho-
before great
•testants d Jews in New
lics,
Yo
Cathedr of St. John the
e. It w
at that meeting
Pershi
•roposed that the
tians
America raise $25,-
atch the sum being
0 ,000
sou
American Jews under
t •
dership of the Joint Dis-
ution Committee for Euro-
pean Jewish relief and recon-
struction.
In that address, General Persh-
ing said, among other things:
"Jews are an essential part of
America. As citizens among us,
they have always done their full
part. When the time came to
serve their country under arms,
no class of people served with
more patriotism or with higher
motives than the young Jews who
volunteered or were drafted and
who went overseas with our other
young Americans. I well remem-

FIRST STOP ON PAYDAY

Guardian

Savings

Where Your

Dollar

Earns More

NOT 1% - 2%
or 3%
BUT A BIG

Current Rate

Best
every p
befo
ou spen
gee
Gua ian Savin
Acc
mo y grows.
u savi
wi
cer is
ave
e rate
a reg
vin account.
of savi
egu any — it wil
current

. save
to your
fast your
gher than
e savings
in the habit
ou more at the

Open an account in any amount.
Your savings are insured up to
$10,000 by an agency of the U.S.
Government. Come in or save by
mail. Postage paid.

ber, in my inspections of New
York divisions, seeing so many
patriotic, well-disciplined, well-
behaved young Jewish soldiers,
whose commanders spoke of
them in the highest terms. Dur-
ing the war there was no such
thing as race or creed — they
were forgotten.
"During this campaign they
also should be forgotten. It is
for generous Americans of what-
ever religion, to aid the Jews
of America in succoring their
brethren overseas. The Jews of
America have always been in the
forefront of charitable works.
There has never been an attempt
to raise a large sum of money
for a public cause in which the
Jews have not done more than
their share. It is up to the Chris-
tians of America to show that
they appreciate what the Jews
have done in the past. The spirit
of this occasion appeals to me
tremendously. This gathering
should be the beginning of an
era of good will that should
spread throughout America. It is
not so much a question of giving
as it is of showing the proper
spirit. A spirit of good-will is
needed in America, today. It
could have no better beginning
than here in New York in this
great cathedral.
"It is a difficult thing for us
in our prosperous county to imag-
ine just what suffering those
poor people overseas are going
through. This is an occasion for
all Americans, whether Chris-
tians or not, to show our Jewish
friends that we have charitable
instincts, and that there is no
such thing as race prejudice in
this great country. To my mind
this is one of the great lessons
we can teach the people of
Europe by contributing to this
fund.
"I was brought up as a Metho-
dist, and the Methodists are the
greatest beggars in the world. I
want to hark back to my Metho-
dism and appeal to Christian
America to give much greater
contributions to the Jewish fund
than they have contefplated. I
feel sure that this undertaking
will meet with very cordial and
generous response all over the
country, especially if New York
City gives it the right kind of
start. Christians of America
ought to raise at least as much
as the Jews themselves are rais-
ing. Twenty-five millions are not
too much for the Christians to
raise to help those poor people
over there. The Jews will raise
their twenty-five millions all
right, and if the Christians can-
not duplicate it — well, I don't
know, I'd like to tell them what
I think about them."
He defended the right of nat-
uralized Americans to maintain
a continuing interest in the cul-
ture of their birthplace. "We
have no quarrel," Pershing de-
clared, "with Americans of for-
eign birth or stock who cling to
the music, art, folklore and the
better traditions of the old land.
They would be less than human
and we would be poorer if they
didn't. If we bring together peo-
ple from different lands, of dif-
ferent creeds and varied condi-
tions and merge them into on
America, the product will be t
greatest of all nations and a r
that will long hold a compel
place in the world."
That was General John
Pershing, commander-in-chief
the American Expedition
Force in World War I, the cen
tennial of whose birth on Sept.
13 has been proclaimed by Presi-
dent Eisenhower and Congress as
"General of the Armies John J.
Pershing Centennial Day."

Israel Attends Atomic
Conference in Brussels

Downtown: CADILLAC SQUARE Corner RANDOLPH
Northwest: 13646 WEST 7 MILE Corner TRACEY
Both offices open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday thru Friday

Northwest office open Thursday Night till 9
Downtown, Friday till 6

BRUSSELS, (JTA)—Israel is
participating in the Interna-
tional Conference on Legal and
Administrative Problems of Pro-
tection in the peaceful uses of
atomic energy, which opened
here this week.

5 -- THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS — Friday, September 9, 1960

Pershing and the Fighting Jews

the traditional wag
to sag

happy arm year

"` ` with

BARTONS
64.
o

continental
confections

ROSH HASHANAH ASSORT.
MENT — The cover design shows

"LeShanah Tovah" lettered in
Hebrew on the breastplate of the
Torah. And inside, Barton's brand
new (and more delicious than
ever) assortment of" Continental
miniature chocolates.
1 lb. (milk, bittersweet,
parve) $1.98
2 lbs. Assorted
$3.96

.

PLASTIC SHOFAR — A plastic
toy shofar that really blows!
Clearly embossed on it are the
symbols of the Twelve Tribes and
a New Year greeting. Filled with
chocolates and hard candies. In.
a bright holiday-decorated box.

'99c

PECAN HONEY CAKE —Fresh

and fragrant! A flavorful golden-
brown Holiday loaf, rich in honey
and crisp toasted pecans.
13 oz., parve
$1.19
1 lb. 8 oz., parve
$1.98

NEW YEAR PETITS FOURS —

Luscious cream fillings between
thin layers of pastry. Chocolate-
d topped with nuts and
ssorted flavors:
um, mara-

79

EXTRA! Ask
Biblical

r free copy of Barton's new
in Biblical Times.

iFe Rd.

Across from Dexter Davison Mkt.

Barton's Confections and Baked Delicacies Are Also
Available at CROWLEY'S STREET FLOOR

OPEN SUNDAYS and EVENINGS

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