May 25, 1960

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May 25, 1960 (vol. 6, iss. 10) • Page Image 11

… I DAI ( r ' I DAt I AGAz: Any way you look at it .. . WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 1960 WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 1960 it's a GREENE'S Handi-Hamper . . . And any way you add it up, you get the same answer: Best bet for cleaning and storing your out-of-season clothes. Here's how it works-you pick up a Greene's Handi-Hamper from the store nearest you (see below) or call to have a driver drop one off for you. Fill it with your tired winter wardrobe a...…

May 25, 1960 (vol. 6, iss. 10) • Page Image 12

… 'U' Plans Five-Year Outlay Program Faculty Senate: Its Place in J A Modernization of Facilities Stressed by Officials f By Thomas Turner THE UNIVERSITY'S plans for future growth are set down in a five-year, $130 million capital outlay program, prepared at the request of the Legislature. The program would allow for accommodation of 28,000-30,000 students (in contrast to the pres- ent 25,000), according to Vice- President and Dean of Fac...…

May 25, 1960 (vol. 6, iss. 10) • Page Image 13

… ARE THEY DOING? The Place of Alumni at the University Continued from Page Thirteen better controlled, but "the cleanest athletic set-up in the Big Ten" is claimed for the University. Martens reports little alumni pressure or interest (until recent- ly) in University fraternities. The houses are owned by alumni cor- porations and only when finances get in bad shape do the alumni step in. But in other areas, Martens says there is little or no...…

May 25, 1960 (vol. 6, iss. 10) • Page Image 14

…Fac ty Senate: Its Plac By Joan Kaatz and Peter Dawson NINETY YEARS ago the Univer- sity Senate had social and literary meetings in professors' homes every fortnight. Now it has 1500 members, 200 of whom come to meetings held twice a year, and committees do most of its work. Today questions arise about the Senate: Is it effective, or is it too big? Should it be replaced with a smaller group? And, more gener- ally, does the faculty have enou...…

May 25, 1960 (vol. 6, iss. 10) • Page Image 15

… ie Place of Alumni at the University EN'S HONO IA II Continued from Page Eleven thur Hill (Hill Auditorium) suf- ficient to meet the University's needs. Each year the number of contributors to the fund 'has in- -creasedi by about 2,000, until it now includes 13 per cent of those alum- ni solicited. The Council welcomes modest contributions: one dollar for every year since graduation is one alumni giving formula which is stressed. ALUMN...…

May 25, 1960 (vol. 6, iss. 10) • Page Image 16

…3W 0.. A View o the Growing University What New Problems Will Be Cr Continued from Page Three the same time a result'of such a f breakdown. This lack of commit- ment is expressed in a general lack of interest in the Faculty Senate, and in a faculty value-system. which places departmental affairs well above all-campus affairs. The Place of Alumni at the How Great Is Their Influence and How Is Their Value Shown? eated ? By Robert Junker It w...…

May 25, 1960 (vol. 6, iss. 10) • Page Image 17

…Activities at the University Student Activities and Edu SLAT ER'S PAY. Continued from Page Seven ing May-Day-like parades and endorsements of programs con- ceived by such pressure groups. Such response to "in-group" pres- sures further divorces SGC from the bulk of those it represents. THEDIVORCE of constituent from representatives is fre- quently a feature of the housing group governments, especially the independent ones. Such a lack of co...…

May 25, 1960 (vol. 6, iss. 10) • Page Image 18

…BI ent ti e University In 'hat Ways Has the Concept bN JAMES ANGELL 18 -1910 HARRY HUTCHINS 1910-1919 By Philip Power AN OLD CAMPUS tradition has Ait that when James B. Angell was president of the University from 1887 to 1909, it was his prac- tice to take a walk when he had finished his work for the day. As this was often early in the morn- ing, he usually found the streets deserted and the campus silent. Quite early one morning, he...…

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