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March 31, 2021 - Image 1

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STYMIED

MEN’S BASKETBALL

TEDDY GUTKIN
Daily Sports Writer

INDIANAPOLIS — The Michigan men’s
INDIANAPOLIS — The Michigan men’s

basketball team had aspirations of playing in the
basketball team had aspirations of playing in the

Final Four.
Final Four.

On Tuesday night, it came up just short. In a
On Tuesday night, it came up just short. In a

stunning upset, the Wolverines (23-5) fell to the
stunning upset, the Wolverines (23-5) fell to the

East Region’s 11-seed UCLA (22-9), 51-49. The
East Region’s 11-seed UCLA (22-9), 51-49. The

Bruins’ Johnny Juzang proved to be the night’s
Bruins’ Johnny Juzang proved to be the night’s

star, scoring 27 points en route to winning the
star, scoring 27 points en route to winning the

region’s Most Outstanding Player Award.
region’s Most Outstanding Player Award.

The Wolverines had chances to take the lead
The Wolverines had chances to take the lead

late, but two close misses from freshman center
late, but two close misses from freshman center

Hunter Dickinson and graduate guard Mike Smith
Hunter Dickinson and graduate guard Mike Smith

came up short. Ultimately, Michigan had several
came up short. Ultimately, Michigan had several

chances to clinch a spot in the Final Four, but its
chances to clinch a spot in the Final Four, but its

own errors acted as the ultimate impediment.
own errors acted as the ultimate impediment.

With mere seconds left, sophomore wing Franz
With mere seconds left, sophomore wing Franz

Wagner came up short on a 3-pointer before senior
Wagner came up short on a 3-pointer before senior

guard Eli Brooks failed to score on an offensive
guard Eli Brooks failed to score on an offensive

rebound. After Juzang split a pair of free throws,
rebound. After Juzang split a pair of free throws,

Smith missed on a pullup 3-pointer. Michigan
Smith missed on a pullup 3-pointer. Michigan

retained possession, but a miss from Wagner at the
retained possession, but a miss from Wagner at the

horn clanked off the rim, sealing Michigan’s fate.
horn clanked off the rim, sealing Michigan’s fate.

Turnovers proved to be Michigan’s undoing,
Turnovers proved to be Michigan’s undoing,

committing 14 to UCLA’s eight and routinely
committing 14 to UCLA’s eight and routinely

coughing up the ball on possessions just when it
coughing up the ball on possessions just when it

appeared to finally be gaining momentum.
appeared to finally be gaining momentum.

After halftime, the Bruins started hot. Tyger
After halftime, the Bruins started hot. Tyger

Campbell scored two quick makes before Juzang
Campbell scored two quick makes before Juzang

knocked down three free throws to give the
knocked down three free throws to give the

Bruins a game-high nine point advantage. After
Bruins a game-high nine point advantage. After

Michigan’s 10th turnover of the game, the reality
Michigan’s 10th turnover of the game, the reality

of a season ending defeat began to set in, just shy
of a season ending defeat began to set in, just shy

of the Final Four’s doorstep.
of the Final Four’s doorstep.

Then, Michigan’s offense woke up.
Then, Michigan’s offense woke up.

Dickinson went to work down low for the
Dickinson went to work down low for the

Wolverines, scoring on two straight possessions
Wolverines, scoring on two straight possessions

to help pull Michigan within five. On the ensuing
to help pull Michigan within five. On the ensuing

possessions, Brooks followed with two layups to
possessions, Brooks followed with two layups to

cap an 8-0 run to force Bruins coach Mick Cronin
cap an 8-0 run to force Bruins coach Mick Cronin

to burn a timeout as the previously dormant
to burn a timeout as the previously dormant

Michigan offense was suddenly injected with life.
Michigan offense was suddenly injected with life.

UCLA, though, responded. The Bruins’ Cody
UCLA, though, responded. The Bruins’ Cody

Riley backed Dickinson down and finished inside
Riley backed Dickinson down and finished inside

before Dickinson was called for an illegal screen.
before Dickinson was called for an illegal screen.

Just minutes after it appeared and the Wolverines
Just minutes after it appeared and the Wolverines

were ready to retake the lead, UCLA countered
were ready to retake the lead, UCLA countered

again. The Bruins’ work on the offensive glass
again. The Bruins’ work on the offensive glass

also proved to be a continual backbreaker for the
also proved to be a continual backbreaker for the

Wolverines, grabbing seven.
Wolverines, grabbing seven.

Senior center Austin Davis proved to be the
Senior center Austin Davis proved to be the

Wolverines’ spark off the bench. After Dickinson
Wolverines’ spark off the bench. After Dickinson

picked up his second foul, the senior entered the
picked up his second foul, the senior entered the

game and proceeded to score seven points, finding
game and proceeded to score seven points, finding

good looks down low and playing solid defense
good looks down low and playing solid defense

on the other side of the court as well. In the final
on the other side of the court as well. In the final

game of his collegiate career, Davis provided some
game of his collegiate career, Davis provided some

of his best minutes of the year.
of his best minutes of the year.

Sophomore wing Franz Wagner noticeably
Sophomore wing Franz Wagner noticeably

struggled just with two points — a career-low
struggled just with two points — a career-low

— and struggled to generate good looks inside.
— and struggled to generate good looks inside.

Wagner, who has arguably been the Wolverines’
Wagner, who has arguably been the Wolverines’

best all-around player in this postseason, fought
best all-around player in this postseason, fought

to make a dent in its most important contest of the
to make a dent in its most important contest of the

year.
year.

Off the bench, senior forward Chaundee Brown
Off the bench, senior forward Chaundee Brown

Jr. provided big minutes. In addition to playing
Jr. provided big minutes. In addition to playing

solid defense, Brown knocked down a key triple
solid defense, Brown knocked down a key triple

to knot the score at 46 with five minutes to play.
to knot the score at 46 with five minutes to play.

The Wolverines took the lead off a free throw from
The Wolverines took the lead off a free throw from

Dickinson, but the momentum was short-lived,
Dickinson, but the momentum was short-lived,

with UCLA’s Jules Bernard scoring inside to give
with UCLA’s Jules Bernard scoring inside to give

the Bruins the lead back.
the Bruins the lead back.

Ultimately, the Wolverines’ storybook season
Ultimately, the Wolverines’ storybook season

ended up just short of their lofty goals. And while
ended up just short of their lofty goals. And while

confetti did rain down from the Lucas Oil Stadium
confetti did rain down from the Lucas Oil Stadium

roof, it wasn’t for them.
roof, it wasn’t for them.

GOT A NEWS TIP?
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us know.
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@michigandaily

ANN ARBOR, MI | WEDNESDAY, MARCH 31, 2021 | MICHIGANDAILY.COM

Four members of the University of

Michigan’s Board of Regents — half the

Board — called on Regent Ron Weiser

(R) to resign in the days following

his comments at a March 25 North

Oakland Republican Club meeting,

during which Weiser called top

Michigan Democratic lawmakers “the

three witches” and made references to

political assassination.

These comments — likely made in

reference to Gov. Gretchen Whitmer,

Michigan Attorney General Dana

Nessel, Michigan Secretary of State

Jocelyn Benson and two Michigan

Republican Congressmen who voted

to impeach former President Donald

Trump — drew criticism on social

media from various Regents and

student groups like the Graduate

Employees’ Organization. Washtenaw

County prosecutor Eli Savit also

criticized Weiser on Twitter, calling

Weiser’s comments as “misogynistic

and violent.”

While Weiser has been the subject

of criticism from students and faculty

for months due to his initial response

to the Jan. 6 attempted insurrection at

the U.S. Capitol, his role as chairman of

the Michigan Republican Party and the

surfacing of inappropriate emails to the

board, March 26 marked the first time

other regents explicitly called for his

resignation or criticized him directly.

Weiser is one of only two Republican

regents on the board, joined by Regent

Sarah Hubbard (R), who was elected to

the board during the November 2020

general election. Weiser and Hubbard

could not be reached for comment in

time for publication. Regent Katherine

White (D) could also not be reached.

University President Mark Schlissel

issued a statement Saturday afternoon

condemning Weiser’s remarks and

emphasizing the comments do not

represent the Board of Regents.

“Such
words
are
particularly

abhorrent in a climate where so

recently the use of language has

engendered violence and attempted

violence directed at elected officials,

our
democratic
institutions,
and

the individuals who guard them,”

Schlissel’s statement said. “It is never

appropriate to raise the specter

of
assassination
or
perpetuate

misogynistic
stereotypes
against

anyone in any setting. Elected officials

must adhere to a higher standard

regardless of the context of their

remarks.”

The statement also noted regents

are elected in a statewide ballot and

recalling a regent would be handled

by the Michigan Secretary of State’s

office.

In three March 26 tweets, Regent

Jordan Acker (D) called on Weiser

to resign and said his “reckless and

dangerous language” is not a reflection

of the University Board of Regents

and inappropriate following the Jan. 6

violence at the U.S. capitol.

“Comments
about
removal
by

‘assassination’ are a literal attack on

our Democracy, and are incredibly

dangerous in light of the January 6th

insurrection at the Capitol … and the

FBI-thwarted attacks on our Governor,”

the tweet reads. “Furthermore, sexist

language referring to the Governor,

Attorney General, and Secretary of

State as ‘witches’ has no place on our

campus. This language and behavior

is incompatible with service to the

University of Michigan.”

Regent Mark Bernstein (D) told

The Daily in a text message he believes

Weiser should resign, calling the

comments “blatantly sexist.”

Four Regents call
for Ron Weiser’s
resignation from
Board of Regents

Tess Crowley/Daily

Jamie Schwaberow/NCAA Photos via Getty Images

ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

Michigan falls to UCLA

51-49 in Elite Eight

Design by Jack Silberman

ADMINISTRATION

Acker, Behm, Bernstein, Brown
say MI GOP chair should
step down from position after
violent, misogynistic comments

CALDER LEWIS &
EMMA RUBERG
Daily News Editors

INDEX
Vol. CXXX, No. 27
©2021 The Michigan Daily

N E WS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

ARTS............................ 5

MIC...............................7

OPINION.......................9

STATEMENT..................11

SP O RTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14

See WEISER, Page 4

The University of Michigan Board

of Regents voted to discontinue

investments in companies engaged in

oil reserves, oil extraction or thermal-

coal extraction at the March 25 Regents

meeting. The board also committed

to a net-zero investment portfolio by

2050 and approved $140 million of

new investments in renewable energy

sources.

The University will no longer

directly invest in companies that are

the largest contributors to greenhouse

gases, which are defined as the top 100

coal and top 100 oil and gas publicly

traded companies in the world, as

compiled by the Carbon Underground

200 list. The University will also

discontinue investments into funds

that have ties to oil reserve depletion or

extraction. This strategy will be paired

with investments into infrastructure

and utilities that support or correlate

with a transition to a carbon-neutral

economy.

The vote was unanimous, though

Regents Katherine White (D) and

Ron Weiser (R) were not present

at the meeting. Weiser, who faced

controversy and calls for his resignation

in January over his initial response

to the Capitol insurrection, has yet to

attend a Regents meeting in 2021.

This vote comes after years of

sustained activism by community

members criticizing the University’s

investments in fossil fuels, and after

repeated pushback by the University’s

administration claiming disinvestment

from fossil fuels would harm the

University’s financial sustainability.

By
making
the
commitment
to

discontinue investments tied to fossil

fuels, the University joins other top

institutions of higher education that

have made similar commitments like

the University of California, Brown

and Columbia.

The board temporarily froze fossil

fuel investments in February 2020 and

studied the issue over the next year

before pursuing the more aggressive

approach announced Thursday.

In its statement, the Climate Action

Movement, the main group that had

pushed for divestment, claimed this as

a “hard-won victory” but criticized the

long-term divestment approach.

“U-M’s partial divestment and

commitment
to
reinvestment
in

renewable energy are crucial steps

toward
toppling
this
malignant

industry, and one driven by almost

a decade of student activism, during

which the administration arrested

and charged peaceful students rather

than meet to address U-M’s inaction

on climate,” the statement read.

“However, the lack of a rapid timeline

for selling its existing fossil fuel

holdings and continued allowance of

investments in so-called natural gas is

utterly unacceptable, at a time when

we must do everything we can to halt

all extraction of fossil fuels.”

CAM also criticized the plan for

continuing
to
allow
endowment

investment into natural gas, a type of

fossil fuel, through private equity funds

and for not addressing the “structural

deficiencies that led U-M to finance

such immoral entities in the first

place.”

“These shortcomings underscore

the critical need for the implementation

of basic, ethical guidelines that ensure

U-M’s investments are not detrimental

to human rights and for oversight of

endowment management through the

establishment of a Standing Committee

for Responsible Investment (SCRI),”

the statement read.

Regents disinvest
from holdings
related to fossil
fuels, oil reserves

ADMINISTRATION

During busy meeting,
Board commits to net-zero
endowment by 2050

CALDER LEWIS,

CHRISTIAN JULIANO

& JARED DOUGALL

Daily News Editor and
Daily Staff Reporters

See DISINVESTMENT, Page 4

Back to Top

© 2023 Regents of the University of Michigan