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September 23, 2020 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily

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After
the
Graduate

Employees’ Organization voted
to accept the University of
Michigan’s proposal and end
its strike, Rackham student Bec
Roldan posted their feelings
about the offer on TikTok.

“To be frank, it’s a pretty

s— offer,” Roldan said on the
popular social media app, where
they have been posting updates
about the strike since it began
Sept. 8.

Roldan said in the TikTok

that they were frustrated they
had to accept the University’s
second proposal — which was
approved exactly one week after
the first was rejected — because
they felt the administration did
not move enough on issues such
as COVID-19 testing and anti-
policing.

But the looming threat of

the
University’s
injunction,

which
University
President

Mark Schlissel filed with the
Washtenaw
County
Circuit

Court Tuesday in hopes of
mandating the graduate student
instructors and graduate student
staff assistants GEO represents
to return to work, ultimately
pushed
members
to
accept

the proposal, despite feeling it
did not meet enough of their
expectations.

“Because it was very obviously

a bad offer, there was not a single
argument that was like, ‘This
is a good deal, we should take
it,’” Rackham student Dawn
Kaczmar said. “All of it was
weighing the risks of harm that
would come to us if we didn’t.”

GEO asked for the universal

right to work remotely, added
support
for
international

students and diverted police
funds when it began its strike
last week. The strike, which had
virtual and in-person picketing,
and the union’s demands were
both shaped and prompted
by
the
ongoing
COVID-19

pandemic.

Members of the union say

they accepted the University’s
proposal
begrudgingly
and

because they felt like they
were running out of options. In
interviews with The Michigan
Daily, multiple graduate students
echoed the same sentiment:
They would not have accepted
the University’s proposal were
it not for rising concerns of
retaliation and an impending
injunction ruling.

The University of Michigan’s

Faculty
Senate
leadership

confirmed
Friday
that
the

faculty’s vote of no confidence

in University President Mark
Schlissel
passed,
reversing

course after an earlier ruling
determined it had failed.

The passage of the vote


which
is
symbolic
and

will
not
impact
Schlissel’s

employment status — means
that the Faculty Senate does
not have faith in the president

to execute his role as the head
of
the
University.
Faculty

Senate members voted on the
motion of no confidence during
a virtual meeting Wednesday
afternoon.

In
an
email
to
faculty

members,
Colleen
Conway,

chair of the Senate Advisory
Committee
on
University

Affairs and professor in the
School of Music, Theatre &
Dance, announced the vote of
no confidence in Schlissel had
actually passed, despite the
previous announcement that it
had failed to receive a majority
of votes.

michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Wednesday, September 23, 2020

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-NINE YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

James S. Jackson, former

psychology
professor
and

director of the University of
Michigan’s Institute for Social
Research, passed away Sept.
1 in Ann Arbor after a long
battle with pancreatic cancer.
His colleagues, students and
mentees
overwhelmingly

remember
him
as
warm,

generous and brilliant.

Jackson was born in 1944

in
Inkster,
Michigan.
He

received his bachelor’s degree
in psychology from Michigan
State University, a master’s
degree in psychology at the
University of Toledo and a
doctorate in social psychology
from Wayne State University.
He retired from the University
this past year, where he had
worked since 1971.

Jackson was the Daniel

Katz
Distinguished

University Professor Emeritus
of Psychology and research
professor
emeritus
at
the

Research Center for Group
Dynamics. He also served as
the director of the Center for
Afroamerican
and
African

Studies and the director of the
Institute for Social Research
from 2005 to 2015, where

he founded and directed the
Program
for
Research
on

Black Americans.

David Lam, current director

of the Institute for Social
Research, said on top of being
a
trailblazing
researcher,

Jackson was charismatic and
personable.

“He was a giant in ISR,”

Lam said. “The PRBA was
visionary. It was really a very
pioneering research program
to study Black Americans. It
produced many generations
of Black scholars of Black
America, health disparities
and racial discrimination. It
was very pioneering for its
time and it’s lasted for over 40
years.”

Jackson was a major name

in the field of survey research.
He
created
the
National

Survey of Black Americans in
1977, the first national cross-
sectional
survey
of
Black

Americans,
to
understand

the diversity within the Black
community.

Robert Taylor, School of

Social Work professor, was
a student and colleague of
Jackson’s. He said Jackson’s
work on the NSBA will be one
of his enduring legacies.

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

INDEX
Vol. CXXIX, No. 131
©2019 The Michigan Daily

N E WS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

M I C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

O PI N I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7

A RT S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 0

STATEMENT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12

SPORTS.......................15
michigandaily.com

For more stories and coverage, visit

OBITUARY

Follow The Daily
on Instagram,
@michigandaily

HANNAH MACKAY

Daily Staff Reporter

BECCA MAHON/Daily

Around 50 U-M students gathered at Balke Transit Center to mourn several causes, including their loss of faith in the University leadership, Sunday evening.

JULIA RUBIN

Daily Staff Reporter

LEAH GRAHAM

& ALEX HARRING
Managing News Editor

& Daily News Editor

See VOTE, Page 3

Official ruling: vote of no confidence
in President Mark Schlissel passes

Faculty Senate leadership announces motion succeeded, reversing course from
previous determination; motion means body does not trust Schlissel to lead ‘U’

Candlelight vigil commemorates
loss of faith in U-M administration

Students mourn COVID-19 deaths, criticize ‘U’ leaders’ for handling of GEO strike

Colleagues remember
Prof. James S. Jackson,
scholar ‘renowned’ for
his optimism, energy

Former Institute for Social Research director
passed away at start of September; Researcher
pioneered efforts to survey Black Americans

GEO members
say they accepted
offer out of fear
of legal threats

Facing a court challenge as the University
files an injunction against them, graduate
students agree to end their ongoing strike

ALEX HARRING

Daily News Editor

See STRIKE, Page 3

See JACKSON, Page 3

RYAN LITTLE/Daily

After some confusion, the University of Michigan’s Faculty Senate leadership confirmed the vote of no confidence against U-M President Mark Schlissel passed.

Students came together to

mourn a variety of causes on
Sunday evening: the 200,000
lost
to
COVID-19,
the
end

of
the
Graduate
Employees’

Organization’s
strike
and

their loss of faith in University
leadership.

A crowd of approximately 50

undergraduate
and
graduate

students gathered at the Blake
Transit Center and marched to
University of Michigan President
Mark Schlissel’s front lawn for a
candlelit vigil.

Students
associated
with

GEO
and
Students
Demand

Representation
organized
the

demonstration, which impeded
traffic from Main Street to State
Street as the group expressed
their discontent with Schlissel,
U-M administrators and local
police. The group arrived at the
front lawn of Schlissel’s house,
where
several
students
and

organizers spoke and played
music.

Rackham
student
Lucy

Peterson, a GEO member who
helped to organize the vigil, said
the goal was to commemorate the
losses of both the organization and
individuals during the pandemic
in addition to raising concerns
about
the
administration’s

reopening.

“What we wanted to do in GEO

was mark a moment — the end of
our strike — and come together
and be able to reflect with one
another,” Peterson said. “200,000
people have died of COVID in
the United States … We have
things to mourn: A lot of us have
known people who have died, and
the strike in some ways took our
attention off of that.”

GEO’s
strike
ended
on

Wednesday when they accepted
the University’s proposal meeting
some but not all demands, one
day after the University filed
an injunction. Members said
they would not have accepted
the University’s proposal had it
not been for concerns over the
potential financial impacts of the
injunction and fears of retaliation.

Students
Demand

Representation is a coalition of
students across the University’s
three campuses working to get
student demands heard by upper-
level administrators. The group
partnered with GEO for a rally
last weekend.

Peterson also said the vigil

provided an opportunity for
those who are discontent with
the
University’s
response
to

COVID-19, the GEO strike or any
other matter to come together in
solidarity. She said U-M leaders,
such as Provost Susan Collins and
LSA Dean Anne Curzan, have
made decisions that have hurt
students.

See VIGIL, Page 3

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