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February 25, 2020 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily

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LSA junior Stephen Dinka arrived
at
the
Shapiro
Undergraduate
Library basement hoping to receive
help with his Foundations of
Computer Science course, EECS 376,
homework at office hours. However,
even though he arrived early, Dinka
saw a massive crowd of students
waiting for the instructional aide.
“That one particular day was
ridiculous,” Dinka said. “There were
people standing around, right at the
front door wondering, ‘Where’s the
IA?’ When the IA finally showed

up, you have all these people just
standing, and there’s no room.
They literally go across the entire
basement and take all these chairs
just to sit around this one guy with a
tiny whiteboard.”
Students
told
The
Daily
overcrowding in the UGLi is a
familiar issue for many students
of theory-based computer science
classes. IAs interviewed by The
Daily said they do not want to be a
nuisance in public spaces, but they
need to use them because they do
not have an official area to host office
hours. Unlike professors, they do not
have offices or designated spaces to

meet.
Engineering sophomore Ryan
Baker said he tends to arrive early to
office hours, which IAs hold in the
UGLi, but has also been in positions
where he wasn’t early enough and
there was not enough room in
the UGLi to accommodate all the
students who need help.
“I’ve been in positions where
there are so many people in that
small space that the IA is trying to
utilize that you can’t see what he’s
writing or you can’t hear him at all,”
Baker said. “It’s just kind of pointless
going to office hours at that point
because you can’t get the help you

need.”
According
to
Engineering
junior Ian Robinson, an EECS
376 IA, the overcrowding issue
became
exacerbated
once
the
class was informally kicked
out of the UGLi basement.
For his specific office hours,
Robinson moved to the Design
Lab of the UGLi. Even after
moving, he was still unable to
fit all the students who needed
help but had no other options
as he does not have an office
on campus.

michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Tuesday, February 25, 2020

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-NINE YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

The University of Michigan
International
Institute
presented the Conference on
Migration, attended by about
50 members of the University
community,
on
Monday
at
Weiser Hall. The conference
consisted of interdisciplinary
dialogue driven by presentations
from local and international

scholars.
Topics covered include the
migration of ideas and languages,
causes and effects of migration,
the socio-political implications
of human movement, culture
production and transferral and
countering common narratives
about migration.
Alyssa Park, professor of
modern
Korean
history
at
the University of Iowa, gave a
talk explaining the history of

Korean and Chinese migration
near the Russian border and
how the rules and norms of
migration changed over time.
Due to a lack of land and natural
disasters such as flooding in
Korea in the 19th century, Park
said Korean migrants moved in
waves to Russia, particularly to
Vladivostok province.
“The region (of Vladivostok
was) newly acquired by Russia,
not many Russians there,” Park

said. “So they make do with the
people who are closest and these
would be Chinese and Koreans …
and Vladivostok becomes a hub
for these people.”
Park also talked about Russia
then claiming that the Korean
immigrants
were
Russian
“subjects,”
the
equivalent
of
modern-day
citizens.

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

INDEX
Vol. CXXIX, No. 75
©2020 The Michigan Daily

N E WS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

O PI N I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

CL A SSIFIEDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6

S U D O K U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

S P O R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

A R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
michigandaily.com

For more stories and coverage, visit

Panelists
examine
injustice,
violence

CAMPUS LIFE

SARAH ZHAO
For The Daily

‘U’ International Institute hosted
conference, dialogue on migration

The lectures focused on the socio-political implications of human movement

GOVERNMENT

Follow The Daily
on Instagram,
@michigandaily

Approximately
50
students,
faculty and community members
gathered
in
the
Rackham
Assembly Hall on Monday evening
to
attend
“Gender
Violence,
Immigrant Vulnerability and the
State: A Symposium.” The event
was designed to educate students
and the community about how
increased
globalization
and
migration is affecting how society
views immigrants in the post-
colonial world.
Debotri Dhar, women’s studies
professor at the University of
Michigan, organized the event
along with other speakers.
According to Dhar, residual
ideals from the colonial era have
resulted in immigrants of color
being framed as burdens on
the state in order to maintain
hierarchies of race, social class
and nation present in the colonial
era. She said this also contributes
to
the
relationship
between
immigrant
vulnerability
and
gender violence in today’s post-
colonial era.
“This
current
moment
in
history is very politically divisive,
not just for the nation but globally,”
Dhar said.

SUNSKRITI PARANJAPE
Daily Staff Reporter

RYAN LITTLE/Daily
Roman Witt artist in residence Courtney McClellan explores how performance afffects a courtroom at the UMMA Monay evening.

Ford School presents
conversation on drug
pricing solutions, case
study in global economy

LILY GOODING
Daily Staff Reporter

See OFFICE HOURS, Page 2

DESIGN BY TAYLOR SCHOTT

Following mishaps with Iowa caucus,
gov’t employees speak on preparations

Experts talk impact of
colonial-era discourse
on immigrants of color,
modern-day rhetoric

CS instructional aides struggle to
find adequate space for office hours
Unlike professors or graduate students, IAs are undergraduates who do
not have a designated place to teach students, leading to overcrowding in libraries

The Ford School of Public
Policy hosted a discussion with
Priti Krishtel, the co-founder
and co-executive director of the
Initiative for Medicines, Access
and
Knowledge.
The
event
titled, “To Solve Drug Pricing
We Must Solve the Drug Patent
Problem,” was a part of the
Science, Technology and Public
Policy speaker series at the Public
Policy School. There were about
30 people in attendance Monday
evening.
Krishtel began to discuss her
work as an advocate for drug
patent reform. Throughout her
career, Krishtel has worked with
many global organizations and
agencies such as the Indian NGO
Lawyers Collective.
She gave a brief history of
India’s patent system and spoke
about how high prescription drug
prices impacted the community.
“The common service we had
to provide for clients was to draw
up adoption and documentation
papers. This was because parents
knew that they were going to pass
away and they needed to make
sure their children were cared
for,” Krishtel said.

Speaker
discusses
reform of
patents

MI officials
look ahead
to primary
election day

FRANCESCA DUONG
Daily Staff Reporter

The Iowa caucuses have
kicked off every presidential
primary election race since
1972 and serve to narrow down
the field of candidates in each
political party. However, what
ensued during this year’s Iowa
caucus left both the importance
and credibility of the historic
event in question ahead of
the remaining caucuses and
primaries. It ultimately took
party officials 15 days to get
100 percent of the votes in,
with candidates Pete Buttigieg
and Sen. Bernie, D-Vt., Sanders
determined as the winners.
There
were
issues
downloading a new app the
Iowa Democratic Party rolled
out, with only 439 people
ultimately
submitting
their
votes through the app out of
1,765 precincts.
The mishaps of the Iowa
caucus
left
many
voters
discouraged. LSA senior Jessica
Kosticak,
co-president
for
Students for Pete, was in Iowa
as the caucus results unfolded.
“It was an interesting sight
to behold. It was just wild,”
Kosticak
said.
“As
I
was

traveling back to Michigan the
day after (the Iowa caucus), my
road trip partner was reading
me poll results and as some of
the precinct results started
coming in, I was like, ‘Okay,
but is it real?’ There was a lot
of skepticism in person and
online. There still continues to
be, I think rightfully so.”
The Michigan primary on
March 10 is a key moment,
since the state is considered a
battleground state in the 2020
election. Donald Trump won in
Michigan by over 10,000 votes
in 2016 where, in previous
elections, the state had voted
Democratic,
and
since
has
voted in a Democratic governor.
While
acknowledging
the
mishaps
of
the
Iowa
caucus, Jake Rollow, director
of
communications
at
the
Michigan Department of State,
highlighted
the
differences
between the way each state
runs their primary elections.
“I always use the apples to
oranges
comparison.
Iowa’s
run by caucuses, ours aren’t
caucuses, they’re primaries,”
Rollow said.

JULIA FORREST
Daily Staff Reporter

Read more at
MichiganDaily.com

Read more at
MichiganDaily.com

Read more at
MichiganDaily.com

See PRIMARY, Page 3

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