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February 14, 2020 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily

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The
University
of
Michigan School of Public
Health and Healthy Policy
Student Association hosted a
panel discussion focusing on
the importance of health care
policy in the context of the
election year on Thursday
afternoon. About 50 students
and
community
members
attended the event.
The
panelists
included
Jonathan
Cohn,
senior
national
correspondent
at
HuffPost;
Charles
Gaba,
health
care
analyst
and
founder
of
ACAsignups.
net; and Marianne Udow-
Phillips, founding executive
director
of
the
Center
for Health and Research
Transformation
at
the
University. The discussion
was moderated by Daniel
Lee, associate chair of health
management and policy.
Gaba
discussed
how
health
care
policy
has
changed over the years with
each election cycle in the
context of divided opinions

on
the
Affordable
Care
Act, commonly known as
“Obamacare,” a health care
reform law enacted under
former
President
Barack
Obama’s
administration.
According
to
Gaba,
the
repeal of Obamacare would
be inefficient.
“We
are
spending
as
much money to put in the
administrative
oversight
of work requirements as it
would cost to just cover the
people who would get kicked
off of the program because of
it,” Gaba said.
In
the
case
of
pharmaceutical
drugs,
Udow-Phillips said intense
pressure from the public
to target individual drugs
in an effort to lower prices
might be more effective than
legislation. She stressed the
power
of
pharmaceutical
lobbyists and their ties to
both the Democratic Party
and Republican Party.
“This is not a party issue,
this is an issue of how
powerful that lobby is,” she
said.

The
School
for
Environment
and
Sustainability
hosted
its
annual
Michigan
Environmental
Justice
Summit
on
Thursday.
About 700 students, faculty
and Ann Arbor residents
gathered in the Rackham
Auditorium
to
honor
the
30th
Anniversary
of
the
“Incidence
of
Environmental
Hazards
Conference,”
the
1990
conference
that
sparked
high-level
government
meetings and contributed
to the formation of an
Environmental Protection

Agency
special
task
force under the Clinton
administration.
The
panelists
on
the
National
Panel
of
EJ
Game
Changers
began
by
recognizing
and
celebrating the progress
that environmental justice
has made over time. While
the movement first gained
traction in 1982 through
an
Black
community’s
protest
against
a
local
waste landfill, it has now
been expanded nationwide
as
more
marginalized
communities began to fight
for
their
environmental
rights.
Panelist
Charles
Lee,
a senior policy adviser at

the EPA, mentioned that
the issue of environmental
justice
did
not
have
a
name
when
he
first
started
working,
but
as
communities
have
empowered
themselves,
real changes have been
made and more scholarly
work has been produced in
the area.
Beverly
Wright,
panelist and founder of
the
Deep
South
Center
for
Environmental
Justice, also commented
on
how
advocates
and
scholars
have
sparked
policy changes that aid
communities nationwide.
“If you think nothing has
changed, this is light years

in terms of the difference
between
the
way
we
interact with government,”
Wright said. “We literally
had to lock EPA people in a
room to listen to us. It was
tough.”
Wright recounted how
she first made a connection
between
justice
and
activism when she first
witnessed the effects of
local pollution on Black
communities and pointed
to racial segregation as
one of the causes of such
suffering.
“Why are we the only
ones living fence line with

michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Friday, February 14, 2020

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-NINE YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

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Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
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INDEX
Vol. CXXIX, No. 70
©2020 The Michigan Daily

NEWS .........................1A

OPINION.....................4A

LOV E N OT E S . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 C

STATEMENT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1B

A R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 A

S P O R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 A
michigandaily.com

For more stories and coverage, visit
Follow The Daily
on Instagram,
@michigandaily

For the fourth year in a
row, the Detroit Community-
Academic Urban Research
Center has partnered with
Poverty
Solutions
at
the
University of Michigan to
provide funding for projects
seeking to develop policy to
alleviate urban poverty.
The Detroit URC is a
community
and
academic
partnership
working
to
improve
health
for
Detroit
residents
through
community-based research.
Barbara Israel, professor in
the Department of Health
Behavior
and
Health
Education and director of the
Detroit URC, said the URC
partnership
with
Poverty
Solutions is beneficial. It
combines Poverty Solutions’
resources with the URC’s
expertise in funding seed
projects, which are projects
that are launched with a
small amount of funding.
Israel
said
Poverty
Solutions and Detroit URC
selected
projects
based
on
how
equitably
they
involved
community
and

Approximately
30
students gathered in the
Yuri Kochiyama Lounge in
the South Quad Thursday
evening to attend “From
Fear
to
Reality:
Yellow
Peril
Anxieties
Over
Coronavirus,”
hosted
by
the United Asian American
Organizations.
This event was designed to
educate students about how
diseases
have
historically
propagated
discrimination
against
Asian
Americans
and address how racially
charged anxieties due to the
coronavirus outbreak reflect
American ideals on health
and immigration.
LSA sophomore Victoria
Minka, an intern for UAAO,
opened up the presentation
by discussing the role of
modern
pop
culture
on
the
frenzy
surrounding
coronavirus.
Minka
emphasized the importance
of
understanding
how
and
why
the
spread
of
misinformation online led to
the spread and normalization
of
xenophobia
stemming
from coronavirus.

Students
examine
fears over
epidemic

CAMPUS LIFE

SARAH ZHAO
For The Daily

30th annual Environmental Justice
Summit highlights intersectionality
Speakers address importance of future activism, policy changes

RESEARCH

Conversations touch on
racially-charged hysteria
about coronavirus, roots
in historic discrimination

$79,500 will go toward
research on alleviating
urban poverty through
programs and policies

JULIA RUBIN
Daily Staff Reporter

See CORONAVIRUS, Page 2A
See DETROIT, Page 3A

Grant to
support 3
projects
in Detroit

DOMINICK SOKOTOFF/Daily
The University of Michigan School for Environment and Sustainability hosted the 2020 Michigan Environmental Justice Summit at Rackham
Auditorium Thursday.

LOLA YANG
For The Daily

Discussions of reform will be of
major significance, panelists say

Health care
experts talk
election year

VARSHA VEDAPUDI
Daily Staff Reporter

See HEALTH CARE, Page 3A

See SUMMIT, Page 3A

Jason White explores advertising,
disrupting the marketing world

See YAFFE, Page 3A

Yaffe Speaker Series brings in Curaleaf Executive, details career

ALYSSA MCMURTRY
Daily Staff Reporter

statement

KELSEY PEASE/Daily
Cura Partners’ Jason White discusses his career, culture, and commerce at the Yaffe Digital Media Initiative Speaker Series Thursday evening in the
Ross School of Business.

Jason
White,
chief
marketing
officer
of
the
cannabis company Curaleaf,
shared his favorite quote by
playwright George Bernard
Shaw at the Ross School of
Business on Thursday to a
crowd of about 100 people.
White said it related to an
overall theme of disruption in
the marketing world.

“A reasonable man adapts
himself
to
the
world;
an
unreasonable one persists in
trying to adapt the world to
his,” White quoted. “Therefore
all progress depends on the
unreasonable man.”
The Yaffe Speaker Series
was co-founded by marketing
lecturer Marcus Collins in 2018
to invite various individuals
to speak with students about
pioneering
change
in
the
marketing industry. Collins

spoke with The Daily before
the Yaffe Speaker Series about
why he felt White was a good
choice for the series.
“So
the
Yaffe
Speaker
Series … is essentially an
initiative at the Ross School
of Business where the focus
is to create programming to
help prepare our students for
the changes in the evolving
media
landscape,”
Collins
told The Daily. “Jason had
a very glowing career. He

has not only been navigating
the digital landscape, he has
been rewriting the rules and
reimagining it.”
White’s
career
started
at
Wieden+Kennedy,
an
advertising agency that works
with large companies like
Nike, when he was 28 years
old. From the moment he
walked in the doors, his White
felt he had found his passion.

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