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December 05, 2019 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily

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Design by Maggie Huang

Thursday, December 5, 2019

University of Michigan students
gathered at the University Spectrum
Center Wednesday evening for a
town hall discussion on creating
a plan to implement an informed
consent model for gender-affirming
care at University Health Services.
At the event, ten students worked
to identify and address health care
disparities for transgender students

at U-M.
The students explained that
at UHS, individuals who wish to
receive gender-affirming care must
first obtain a letter of support from
a licensed mental health provider,
following the standards of care
outlined by the World Professional
Association for Transgender Health.
In place of receiving a clinical
diagnosis,
town
hall
attendees
advocated for UHS to begin using an
informed consent model. This would
let individuals receive treatment on

a consensual basis instead of having
to receive a diagnosis.
LSA senior Camomile Honey
lead the town hall meeting. In
an interview with The Daily, she
said the WPATH Standards of
Care followed by UHS puts up
unnecessary barriers for students
wishing to receive hormone therapy.
“When it comes to the WPATH
Standards of Care, the big word that
comes out is gatekeeping,” Honey
said. “It’s fundamentally difficult
for students, more difficult than an

informed consent model, but it also
sends the wrong message in a lot of
ways.”
According to the UHS website,
UHS currently follows the WPATH
Standards of Care to give individuals
the best care possible. The website
also points users towards the Corner
Health Care Center in Ypsilanti
if they wish to receive gender-
affirming care using the informed
consent model.

michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Thursday, December 5, 2019

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-NINE YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

For Business junior Dajana
Korcari, Instagram is more
than just a social outlet. As a
brand ambassador for several
companies — including Tinder
and Ulta Beauty — Instagram
is also her job. Koracari, an
influencer, relies on revenue
from her posts. But potential
changes to Instagram’s format
could impact her work on
campus.
Instagram
has
started
testing a new feature where
users will no longer be able
to see the number of likes on

other users’ photos. Users will
still be able to see the people
who liked the post and the
number of likes on their own
photos, but no definite number
will be attached to photos and
videos posted for others to see.
While Korcari does not
think that getting rid of likes
will stop her from working as
a brand ambassador, but said it
would change how companies
work
with
Instagram
influencers.
“I think brands are going
to come up with a different
way to choose who they work
with,” Korcari said. “However,
with the brands I’ve worked

with so far, most of them have
been with me posting rather
than amount of likes I get on a
picture.”
Instagram had been testing
the new feature in Australia,
Brazil, Canada, Ireland, Italy,
Japan and New Zealand as
early as April 2019.
In an email, Seine Kim,
product communications lead
at Instagram, said the company
began a global expansion of the
test eliminating the option to
view likes on photos and videos
on Nov. 14, including in the U.S.
market.
“While
the
feedback
from early testing has been

positive, this is a fundamental
change to Instagram, and so
we’re continuing our test to
learn more from our global
community,” Kim wrote.
The
results
from
other
countries who have undergone
the testing have been positive
according to Kim, but creators
are still concerned about how
the change will impact their
work through the app. In
response to concern regarding
influencers, Instagram has said
the company is evaluating ways
to ensure creators are able to
keep their sponsorships.

While Juan Muñoz should be
in the final stretch of completing
his Bachelor of Science degree
in Architecture, the would-
be Taubman senior is instead
launching a GoFundMe to help
pay the University of Michigan’s
out-of-state tuition despite being
a resident of Michigan since age
four.
Muñoz, who is undocumented,
is a recipient of Deferred Action
for
Childhood
Arrivals,
a
program enacted under former
President
Barack
Obama’s
administration
protecting
undocumented child immigrants
from deportation if they met
certain requirements. President
Donald Trump announced plans
to rescind DACA in September
2017.
Muñoz transferred to the
University as a junior after
completing his associate’s degree
in Architecture Technology and
Industrial Design Technology at
Henry Ford Community College.
As the first person in his family to
attend college, Muñoz completed
his associate’s degree in a little
less than five years, paying for
his tuition out of pocket while
balancing a job on top of his
courses.

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us

INDEX
Vol. CXXIX, No. 41
©2019 The Michigan Daily

N E WS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

O PI N I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

CL A SSIFIEDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

S U D O K U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

S P O R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

A R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 B
michigandaily.com

For more stories and coverage, visit

Students talk
benefits, costs
of recreational
marijuana sales

Commencement comes after passage of
Proposal 1 in Michigan last November

The University of Michigan
College
of
Engineering
welcomed Brandi P. Jones, Vice
Dean for Diversity and Strategic
Initiatives
at
University
of
Southern California’s Viterbi
School of Engineering as a
part of the Diversity, Equity,
and Inclusion lecture series in
Pierpont Commons Tuesday
afternoon.
Jones
spoke
to
Michigan
faculty
about
supporting Black engineering
students
at
the
University.
About 50 faculty and students
attended the event.
Jones has over twenty
years of experience working
in higher education. Her job
consists
of
overseeing
the
graduation and retention rates
for underrepresented students
at USC. During her talk, she
highlighted
the
problems
American institutions often fail
to address when working with
Black engineering students.
“I
think
it’s
critical
to
understand specific populations
particularly when there are
differences in the way those
populations are experiencing
colleges of engineering,” Jones
said.

USC Dean
requests
help for
engineers

ACADEMICS

ANCHAL MALH
For The Daily

Businesses, student influencers
discuss Instagram hiding likes

Platform changes garner mixed responses, concern over impact on branding

COMMUNITY AFFAIRS

Follow The Daily

JASMIN LEE
Daily Staff Reporter

RITA VEGA/Daily
A group of 10 students come together to discuss trans healthcare discrepancies at U-M during the Trans Care Town Hall at the University Spectrum Center Wednesday evening.

Brandi P. Jones calls
for support for Black
engineering community
at DEI series lecture

See UHS, Page 2A



Undocumented student
unable to obtain state
resident prices, creates
page on GoFundMe

SONIA LEE
Daily Staff Reporter

See ENGINEERS, Page 3A

BARBARA COLLINS
Daily Staff Reporter

Following Sunday’s opening
of six dispensaries officially
selling recreational marijuana
in Michigan, three of which
are based in Ann Arbor,
students are considering the
impact of this new legislation
in a historically cannabis-
friendly city.
The
commencement
of
recreational
sale
comes
a
year
after
Michigan
passed Proposal 1, allowing
adults over the age of 21 to
possess up to 2.5 ounces
of
marijuana.
Under
the
proposal, recreational sales of
marijuana are subject to a 10
percent excise tax in addition
to
Michigan’s
six-percent
sales tax.
Students like LSA senior
Luke Gaines feel this new
supply
of
recreational
marijuana won’t change life
on campus much since the

University must still abide
by federal laws regarding
the
possession,
use
and
distribution
of
marijuana.
He likened the restraints on
its usage to those placed on
alcohol use on campus. One
of the greatest positives, he
believes, is a generally safer
use of the drug.
“I think weed is healthier
than alcohol — period —
but also, now it’s regulated;
people aren’t worried about
it being laced with anything,”
Gaines said. “I think it will be
safer overall. I think people
like to know where they’re
getting it from and will like
to know that it’s safe and
regulated by the government,
as opposed to needing to buy
it from whomever.”
Exclusive Brands — one of
the three businesses selling
the drug in Ann Arbor —

KATHERINA SOURINE
Daily Staff Reporter

See MARIJUANA, Page 3A

Town Hall proposes informed consent
gender-affirming care model at UHS

See INSTAGRAM, Page 3A

See FUNDRAISER, Page 3A

Senior at
‘U’ starts
fundraiser
for tuition

Students call current Health Services policy outdated, difficult to maneuver

the
2010s b-side

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