100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 08, 2019 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Ann Arbor City Council
had
its
first
October
meeting
this
Monday,
discussing issues such as
a Packard Road rezoning
ordinance and marijuana
legislation.
The meeting began with
a proclamation from Ann
Arbor Mayor Christopher
Taylor and Ann Arbor
Fire Chief Mike Kennedy
to kick off Fire Prevention
Week. The Ann Arbor
Fire
Department
and
the
National
Fire
Protection
Association
are
collaborating
to
promote
the
national
2019 campaign, with an
emphasis
on
ensuring
smoke
detectors
are
functioning
and
practicing
fire
safety
plans.
Lisa
Jackson,
vice
chair of the Independent
Community
Police
Oversight
Commission,
then
spoke
on
the
progress
of
the
commission,
created
last March after citizens
expressed concern over

the transparency of the
selection
process.
The
2014 shooting and death
of Aura Rosser by an
Ann Arbor police officer
highlighted the need of
the commission and City
Council
unanimously
passed
a
resolution
to
establish
to
police
oversight
board
in
October 2018.
Jackson described the
commission’s
primary
vision
to
foster
a
transparent and mutually
beneficial
relationship
between the Ann Arbor
Police Department and
the
community.
She
described the numerous
trainings undertaken by
the police department and
encouraged individuals to
file complaints through
the committee. Jackson
said they are optimistic to
work with newly sworn in
Police Chief Michael Cox.
“Transparency
is
at
the heart of earning and
growing
that
trust,”
Jackson said. “We want to
hear feedback, we want to
get criticism and we want
to learn.”

The University of Michigan
held its 2019 Diversity, Equity
and Inclusion summit on Monday
to discuss the importance of
embracing DEI on campus and in
the broader community. The event
featured remarks from University
President Mark Schlissel and Van
Jones, CEO of REFORM Alliance,
political commentator and host of
The Redemption Project and The
Van Jones Show on CNN. The event
took place at Hill Auditorium and

drew a crowd of more than 1,000
community members.
The
summit
began
with
Chief Diversity Officer Robert
Sellers welcoming the crowd and
describing the University’s DEI
goals. Sellers had a message for
those who criticize DEI initiatives
for focusing only on marginalized
identities: that’s the point, he said.
“DEI is often criticized, and
it’s often criticized based on the
belief that DEI efforts are only
about designating resources and
attention to benefit some specific
particular people to the exclusion

of other people,” Sellers said. “And
those particular people are the
individuals who have traditionally
been
underrepresented
or
marginalized
or
considered
a
minority. I’m here to tell you this
morning that when it comes to
the University of Michigan DEI
plan,
they’re
absolutely
right.
Our plan focuses on a myriad of
forms of diversity and commits to
provide attention and resources
to
those
who
hold
identities
within these forms of adversity
that
have
traditionally
been
underrepresented,
marginalized,

under acknowledged.”
Sellers then discussed
how
people have multiple identities,
and how most people have been
marginalized at some point in their
lives. This is an advantage and a way
for people to find common ground
and create solutions, he said.
“The DEI is a benefit to all of us,
and thus is relevant to all of us,”
Sellers said. “We all hold identities
in which we are privileged as well
as identities in which we have
traditionally been marginalized or
underrepresented.

michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Tuesday, October 8, 2019

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-NINE YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

Wallace House, a University
of
Michigan
organization
that sponsors fellowships for
journalists and hosts events
recognizing
journalists’
work, held a panel event
Monday
night
discussing
the importance of returning
American
hostages
home
safely.
The
event
centered
around the story of freelance

journalist
James
Foley,
who was captured in Syria
Thanksgiving Day 2012 by
terrorist
group
ISIS
and
held for two years until he
was killed in 2014. Diane
Foley,
his
mother
and
founder of the James W.
Foley
Legacy
Foundation,
and Joel Simon, executive
director of the Committee
to Protect Journalists, were
the panelists. The event was
moderated by Margaux Ewen,
the executive director of the

Foley Legacy Foundation.
Lynette
Clemetson,
director of the Wallace House,
began the event by discussing
President
Trump’s
recent
decision to withdraw troops
from Syria. She told the
audience Diane Foley would be
reading a statement from the
foundation about the Trump
administration’s decision.
“This
decision
sends
a
message that those who take
our citizens hostage will not
face American justice,” Foley

said. “We implore President
Trump to hold these ISIS
fighters accountable for their
barbaric human rights crimes
against our citizens and to
protect our country against
the spread of terror, should
they escape.”
Before beginning the panel’s
conversation,
they
played
the trailer for a documentary
produced by the foundation:
“Jim: The James Foley Story.”

U.S. Rep. Debbie Dingell,
D-Mich., led a town hall at
the
Wyandotte
Boat
Club
to
address
the
public’s
environmental
concerns
on
Monday
evening.
The
event featured a panel of ten
speakers, including state Sen.
Stephanie Chang, state Rep.
Cara Clemente, spokespersons
from Friends of the Rouge,
Clean Water Action and other
members of environmentally
oriented
organizations.
Around 100 audience members
from the community attended,
including a group of student
volunteers representing the
Sunrise Movement.
The event began with a
welcome from Dingell, who
thanked
the
Wyandotte
Boat Club for hosting. After
a reminder for the audience
to remain civil, the panel
opened the conversation up for
questions. The first questions
concerned the preservation and
protection of Michigan’s waters
and
ecosystems,
specifically
regarding clean water and the
prominence of invasive species.

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

INDEX
Vol. CXXIX, No. 7
©2019 The Michigan Daily

N E WS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

O PI N I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

CL A SSIFIEDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6

S U D O K U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

A R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

S P O R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
michigandaily.com

For more stories and coverage, visit

Council also passes resolution to create
marijuana licensing review board

EMMA STEIN
Daily Staff Reporter

The Domestic Policy Corps
and Out in Public, two student
organizations
within
the
Ford School of Public Policy,
hosted Samuel Bagenstos,
Supreme Court civil rights
litigator and University of
Michigan law professor, on
Monday
afternoon.
About
30 students attended the
event to hear the discussion
of three pending Supreme
Court cases centered around
LGBTQ+ workers’ rights in
America.
The Department of Justice
appointed Bagenstos, where
he served as the principal
deputy
assistant
attorney
general for civil rights from
2009 until 2011. He worked
as a law clerk for Supreme
Court Justice Ruth Bader
Ginsburg and has published
numerous articles in both
academic and non-academic
publications. Currently, he
is a University of Michigan
Law
School
professor
specializing in civil rights
and constitutional litigation.
He remains an appellate and
civil rights litigator, having
argued four cases in front of
the Supreme Court.

Policy talk
focuses on
LGBTQ+
court cases

GOVERNMENT

Domestic Policy Corps
and Out in Public host
Samuel Bagenstos to
discuss civil rights issues

JULIA FORREST
For The Daily

Panel reflects on life of James
Foley, safety of journalists abroad

Wallace House emphasizes understanding U.S. hostage policy

Dingell
addresses
fossil fuel
concerns

City Council
rejects prior
zoning plan
for Packard

GOVERNMENT

LILY GOODING
For The Daily

Follow The Daily
on Instagram,
@michigandaily

ALEC COHEN/Daily
Diane Foley, mother of freelance journalist James Foley, discusses the government’s inaction after her son’s death in a panel event presented by Wallace House at the
Ford School of Public Policy Monday.

Van Jones discusses DEI,
importance of collaboration

Schlissel, Sellers give remarks at Diversity, Equity and Inclusion summit

See CITY, Page 3

KATHERINA SOURINE
Daily Staff Reporter

ALEC COHEN/Daily
Van Jones, CEO of REFORM Alliance and political commentator, disucusses collaborating with people of different backgrounds as part of his keynote address at the Diversity,
Equity, and Inclusion Summit in Hill Auditorium Monday morning.

See DEI, Page 3

See POLICY, Page 3

EMMA RUBERG
Daily Staff Reporter

See FOLEY, Page 3

Read more at
MichiganDaily.com

U.S. Representative
joins other speakers
to answer questions
on the environment

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan