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September 30, 2019 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily

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Housing
is
an
ongoing
issue that continues to affect
stakeholders in the Ann Arbor
community. For students, it
means pressure to sign leases
in early fall, perhaps without
a full understanding of their
responsibilities
as
a
tenant.
The steady growth of student
enrollment, an average 2.21
percent in the past two years,
exacerbates the issue.
Individuals such as Peter Allen,
professor at the Ross School of
Business and Taubman College
of
Architecture
and
Urban
Planning, believe that students
are an integral part to building a
solution. In Allen’s business class,
Real Estate Essentials, students
are given the opportunity to
do so. And together with the
students from his class, in August
Allen proposed the creation
of a student-led development
accelerator
to
address
the
housing crisis.
Real Estate Essentials has
always included a hands-on
component. But recently, he
has built a proposal to include
the
University,
local
non-
profits and public agencies in a
development accelerator group.
In a presentation to the Business
School Dean Scott DeRue and

Taubman Dean Jonathan Massey
in late August, Allen presented
the development accelerator as
a joint effort and highlighted
the role of his accomplished
students as potential advisory
team members. He identified
four critical issues in Ann
Arbor housing: sustainability,
affordability, mobility and better
neighborhoods.
Allen believes that these issues
can be addressed by transitioning
publicly owned surface parking
lots in the downtown area
to
become
minimal
public
underground parking, introduce
mixed-use developments with
integrated affordable housing and
encouraging public landowners
not to sell but to become long-
term partners in development.
Allen and other stakeholders
are expecting a response from
the deans in the coming weeks.
Housing pressures aren’t only
affecting students or Ann Arbor
residents. Last November, about
4,300 residents in the broader
Washtenaw County area applied
for 600 spots on the Ann Arbor
Housing Commission’s housing
choice voucher waitlist, which
opened for five days for the first
time since 2012.

The Michigan Daily sat down
with E. Royster Harper, vice
president for Student Life at The
University of Michigan, Friday
afternoon to discuss the Sexually
transmitted
infection
testing
policy controversy, the recent
climate
strike,
fraternity
and
sorority life housing complications
with the transition to winter
recruitment
and
Harper’s
announced retirement from the
University.
The Michigan Daily: After
backlash from the University
community,
University
Health
Services reversed its policy so STI
exams are once again covered by

tuition through the health service
fee. From your perspective, why
did the University change the
policy?
E. Royster Harper: I know it’s
hard for students to believe, but
when students give us feedback,
and we hear it, that causes us
to reconsider what it is we’ve
done, and we’re quick to do that.
So here’s our concern: We have
two legitimate competing needs,
keep costs of attendance down
and make sure the students are
getting the health care that they
need. Part of the decision to keep
the cost down was that insurance
that most students have, were
already paying for it. So the folks
that were benefiting the most from
the health service fee were the
insurance companies because we
were paying for stuff they would
pay for. But students said, “Look, if

there’s any chance that my parents
are going to know (about STI
examinations), then I’m going to
be less likely to get the services.”
We didn’t want anything to get
in the way of students getting the
healthcare they need. What wasn’t
comforting
enough,
students
didn’t believe it, whatever the
rationale was, it was clear to us
that some students would choose
not to get tested. Our commitment
is to make sure that our students
are getting good health care. So
once that was clear to us, we just
said, “Okay, this is not the right
decision for us”. So what students
did is they helped us understand
the impact in a way that we had
not understood it before. That’s
why we changed our minds.
TMD:
Why
did
student
activism work in this case?
Harper: I think usually when

the University makes a decision,
there are multiple things that they
are trying to get accomplished. In
this case, money and making sure
the students get good health care,
that it didn’t have a chilling impact.
Students are seldom protesting
about things that don’t matter. But
lots of things matter. So what the
University is weighing is when we
consider everything, where do we
need to be? Sometimes what we
decide is, we can’t change. This is
not one of those, because when we
put everything together, it makes
sense to change. I do think that
sometimes all of us think if I just
raised my voice, or I just protest,
what I want, will occur. But when
you are in a leadership role, you’re
always weighing a lot of points of
views and a lot of different facts.

michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Monday, September 30, 2019

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-NINE YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

Two professors involved in
the intersection of artificial
intelligence and mental health
shared
their
work
Friday
evening at the Ann Arbor
District Library in partnership
with
the
University
of
Michigan’s AI Laboratory.
Emily
Mower
Provost,
associate
professor
of
computer science and electrical
engineering,
and
Melvin
McInnis, professor of bipolar
disorder and depression, are
working together to develop
computational
methods
for
measuring
mood
symptom
severity in bipolar disorder.
McInnis is the director of the
Heinz
C.
Prechter
Bipolar
Research Program, and Provost
is a member.
The panelists first discussed
why they were involved in
the project. Provost, who was
always interested in human
behavior and improving people’s
lives
through
engineering,
said she was excited to work
at the intersection of human-
robot interaction and effective

computing.
“It gives me an opportunity
not only to try to create new and
really innovative algorithms,
but when you put a human-
centered swing into AI, then
you also have the opportunity
to really join engineering and

science,” Provost said. “To me, it
seemed like a really interesting
opportunity to do something
meaningful to do engineering
that had an impact on people’s
lives. … We specialized and
started working in emotion
recognition, where the goal

was to take in speech and try
to quantify ambiguity that’s
associated with how people
express emotions, which was
exciting.”

BUSINESS
AI Laboratory presents panel on
tech use in mental health research

Heinz. C. Prechter Bipolar Reserach Program explains intersection of human-robot interactions

SONIA LEE
Daily Staff Reporter

About 200 people gathered
at the Campus Farm for the 8th
Annual Harvest Festival, with
live musician performances, farm
tours, free food, pumpkin painting
and
many
other
sustainable
activities.
MDining was a sponsor of the
Harvest Festival. Concord and
empire apples were on the table
as well as a concoction of barley
with vegetables and many other
ingredients from the campus farm.
Pumpkin painting was the
main activity that attracted many
students and Ann Arbor residents.
The pumpkins were donated to
Harvest Festival by Slow Farms,
an organic farm in Ann Arbor that
handpicks all of its harvest.

‘U’ Campus
Farm holds
8th annual
fall festival

CAMPUS LIFE

MDining, UMBees spread
environmental awareness
at outdoor Harvest event

JASMIN LEE
For the Daily

ALEC COHEN/Daily
Emily Mower Provost, associate prof. of computer science, shares her experience with emotion recognition at an event
on artificial intelligence, personalized technology and mental health at the Ann Arbor District Library Friday evening.

Rutgers run out
A week after a season-
altering loss, Michigan
bounced back with a 52-0
win over the Scarlet Knights.

» Page 1B

The Ross School of Business
hosted
the
Michigan
Sport
Business Conference last Friday.
Established in 2012 when two
Michigan students realized the
potential for the sports business
market in Ann Arbor, MSBC has
become the largest undergraduate-
run sports business conference in
the nation.
With 800 students, industry
professionals,
professors
and
faculty
in
attendance,
the
conference was composed of
panels, such as “The Business of
eSports” and “Managing Your
Career in Sports,” as well as
networking breaks and individual
speeches.

Largest student-run
convention in industry
hosts leading experts

NIKKI KIM
Daily Staff Reporter

Professor aims
for student-led
program to fix
housing crisis

Faculty member proposes joint
effort for development in Ann Arbor

VP Harper discusses recent climate
strike, STI testing and retirement

Administrator says ‘It has been such an honor...the gift for 20 years has been to me’

KATHERINA SOURINE
Daily Staff Reporter
RUCHITA IYER/Daily
E. Royster Harper, vice president of Student Life, speaks on student activism and University healthcare at the Fleming Administration Building Friday afternoon.

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

INDEX
Vol. CXXIX, No. 1
©2019 The Michigan Daily

N E WS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

O PI N I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

CROSSWORD................6

M I C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

A R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

S P O R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 B
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CLAIRE HAO & PARNIA
MAZHAR
Daily News Editor & Daily Staff
Reporters

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