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September 23, 2019 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily

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Hundreds of United Auto
Workers picketers were met
by
presidential
candidate
Sen.
Elizabeth
Warren
at
the General Motors Detroit-
Hamtramck
Plant
Sunday
afternoon. Warren marched
with workers at the plant
who are striking because of
contract
negotiations.
GM
has announced the plant is
expected to close in January
2020.
“GM
made
billions
of
dollars in profits last year and
closed five plants around the
county,” Warren said at a press
conference after picketing.
“GM is demonstrating that it
has no loyalty to the workers
of America or to the people of
America. Their only loyalty is
to their own bottom line.”
The decision to strike was
made by UAW leaders last
week after a 2015 collective
bargaining
agreement
expired. Nearly 50,000 UAW
members across the country
are striking until the UAW
and GM agree on a contract
that preserves fair wages,
affordable health care, profit
sharing and job security for
temporary
and
permanent
workers.
UAW’s strike is expected to

cost GM $50 million per day.
The union last went on strike
in 2007, though it ended after
two days when the parties
reached an agreement.
Ahead of her visit, Warren
met with state politicians,
including Michigan Attorney
General Dana Nessel, and
UAW
leaders
at
Legends
Coney Island in Detroit to hear
about workers’ experiences
first hand. Warren said she
has
advocated
for
union
rights while in the Senate and
would continue to if elected
president.
“The workers of the UAW
are here to say ‘no more,’”
Warren said. “They want a
fair wage. They want benefits.
They want what it takes to
be part of America’s middle
class.”
Warren, who was named
the
leading
Democratic
candidate in Iowa in a recent
poll from the Des Moines
Register, CNN and Mediacom,
refused to speculate about
polls at this point in the race
when speaking with the press.
Other presidential hopefuls,
including Sen. Bernie Sanders
and Sen. Amy Klobuchar, have
also made or intend to make
visits to the Detroit picketers.

Naina
Agrawal-Hardin,
one
of the lead organizers of the
Washtenaw
County
Climate
Strike and a junior at Washtenaw
International High School, is
worried for her future.
“I’m here fighting for climate
justice because I know that if we
don’t fight for climate justice then
we won’t have anything left to
fight for,” Agrawal-Hardin said.
Students,
faculty
and
Ann
Arbor residents gathered for the
Washtenaw County Climate Strike
on Ingalls Mall Friday afternoon.
The strike included main-stage
performances by activists, poets
and musicians, as well as more than
25 workshops educating attendees
on issues related to climate change
such as “Green New Deal 101,”

“Addressing Climate Change at
Home,” “The Importance of Water
in Indigenous Communities” and
more.
According to a tweet from
16-year-old
Swedish
climate
activist
Greta
Thunberg,
the
leading
figure
of
the
#FridaysForFuture
movement,
more than 4,638 youth climate
strikes took place Friday in more
than 139 nations.
The
movement
began
in
August
2018
after
Thunberg
began protesting the lack of
climate action from the Swedish
government. Thunberg sat outside
the Swedish parliament every
school day for three weeks and
inspired a world-wide movement,
led primarily by young people, to
hold their nations accountable
to cut greenhouse-gas emissions
to maintain a below 2 degrees

Celsius pre-industrial levels, in
alignment with the 2015 Paris
Agreement.
Last
March’s
Washtenaw
County Climate Strike, which had
an estimated turnout of 2,500-
3,000 people, led to the arrest of
10 students who participated in
a 7.5-hour sit-in in the Fleming
Administrative Building.
The students refused to leave
until President Mark Schlissel
addressed their demand for a one-
hour public meeting about the
University’s plan for combating
climate change and attaining
carbon
neutrality
without
screening questions. Last week,
the
six
demonstrators
who
were charged with trespassing
appeared in court for a pretrial
hearing in preparation for the
official Oct. 10 trials.
Efforts
to
combat
climate

change are not only being taken
on by students, but also by local
communities.
On
Wednesday,
the Washtenaw County Board
of
Commissioners
voted
unanimously to endorse a climate
emergency declaration, signalling
the onset of regional efforts to limit
greenhouse gas emissions and
calling on the state of Michigan
and the federal government to
declare a climate emergency.
At Friday’s strike, Business
senior and co-president of Net
Impact Gillian Cobb, who attended
the event, described the student
organization’s goal to promote
sustainable business models. She
explained how climate activism
intersects
with
with
many
academic disciplines.

michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Monday, September 23, 2019

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-EIGHT YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

A group of students gathered
on the front steps of the Hatcher
Graduate
Library
on
Friday
evening for Breaking the Silence
of Stigma on Mental Health,
an event meant to address how
stigma surrounding mental health
impacts communities of color.
Live Love Fitness LLF and the
University of Michigan’s Asian
American Association co-hosted
the event. Different representatives
from organizations across campus
also came to support including
the Black Student Union, CAPS
in Action, United Asian American
Organizations and Hope for the
Day.
Tiffany Yoo, event organizer
and the founder of Live Love
Fitness LLF, spoke at the event
about her struggles with mental
health from middle school to
college. Her speech centered
around how she felt she couldn’t
confide in anyone throughout high
school and most of college.
“During my senior year of high
school, I was obese and that didn’t
help with the depression, which I
didn’t really understand because

nobody would talk about it,” Yoo
said. “Nowadays people know
what depression is, even as a child.
But back then I had no idea what
it really was because I thought I
didn’t know anyone who had it
because no one would talk about
it.”

Yoo
explained
the
stigma
surrounding
anxiety
and
depression held her back from
going out of her comfort zone and
making new friends.
“I was very afraid of people
knowing what I was going through
because I just wanted to make new

friends,” Yoo said. “I didn’t want
people to gossip about me, to be
mean, label me as like, ‘Oh, she’s
like that depressed girl, she has
issues.’”

BUSINESS
Students call for destigmatization
of medical care for mental health

Event seeks to break silence, highlights perspectives in communities of color

JULIA FANZERES
Daily Staff Reporter

In Riverside Park along the
Huron River in Ann Arbor,
family and friends gathered
Saturday night to celebrate
the Leukemia and Lymphoma
Society’s 20th anniversary of
the Light the Night fundraiser.
The night started with food
and games, followed by an
opening ceremony of lighting
the lantern and a walk around
Ann Arbor.
LLS was founded by New
York
couple
Rudolph
and
Antoinette Roesler de Villiers
in 1949 after they lost their
son to leukemia. Named after
their late son, the Robert
Roesler de Villiers Foundation
started in a small Wall Street
office.

Fundraiser
helps fight
leukemia,
lymphoma

CAMPUS LIFE

Light the Night benefits
individuals with cancer,
their friends and family

ALYSSA MCMURTRY
Daily Staff Reporter

MICHAEL BAGAZINSKI/Daily
Tiffany Yoo discusses the necessity of mental health awareness at Breaking the Silence of Stigma on Mental Health
event on the Diag Friday evening.

Madtown Beatdown
Michigan gets rocked, 35-14,
by Wisconsin, exposing
major flaws on both sides
of the ball and opening up
questions that could doom

the season. » Page 1B

The Ross School of Business
hosted
an
open
house
for
its
+Impact
Studio,
the
latest
installment
of
their
Business+Impact initiative, this
Friday. Located on the second floor
of the Executive Learning and
Conference Center, the +Impact
Studio space is designed to be
a collaborative space for cross-
campus problem solving and home
to a +Impact Studio Course.
Business School Dean Scott
Derue told The Daily the aim of
the studio is to create a space for
graduate students and faculty
to work together to solve issues
aligned with the United Nations
Sustainable Development Goals.

Interdisciplinary program
centers around social
consequences of business

ANGELINA LITTLE
Daily Staff Reporter

Warren visits
striking auto
workers in
metro Detroit

Presidential candidate joins state
politicians in supporting UAW

Washtenaw community demands
change in Global Climate Strike

Students walk out of class, call attention to threat of global warming

ALEX HARRING
Daily Staff Reporter

KATHERINA SOURINE
Daily Staff Reporter

ALEXIS RANKIN/Daily
University students, local high schoolers and community members participate in the climate strike that occurred worlwide Friday to support government action on climate
change.

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

INDEX
Vol. CXXVIII, No. 138
©2019 The Michigan Daily

N E WS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

O PI N I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

CL A SSIFIEDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6

M I C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

A R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

S P O R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 B
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