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September 16, 2019 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily

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michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Monday, September 16, 2019

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-EIGHT YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

An audience of 150 gathered
Friday
afternoon
in
the
Annenberg Auditorium of the
Ford School of Public Policy for
a talk titled “Diplomacy in a New
Transatlantic Era.” The event
featured a conversation between
former National Security Advisor
Stephen Hadley; former Assistant
Secretary of State for European
and Eurasian Affairs Daniel Fried;
and President and CEO of the U.S.
Global Leadership Coalition Liz
Schrayer.
The speakers examined key
diplomatic challenges facing the
United States and the crucial
role international affairs has in
fostering the well-being of citizens
within its borders.
The discussion was held in
conjunction with the launch of
the Weiser Diplomacy Center and
the Ford School’s Conversations
Across Difference Initiative, a
series aimed at fostering fruitful
conversation across the political
divide.
The
event
began
with
a
reflection by University Regent
Ron Weiser (R) on the significance

of the opening of the Weiser
Diplomacy center — specifically in
the Midwest.
“Diplomacy can help change
directions, especially for countries
that are going in the wrong

direction — sometimes you can
bring them back around,” Weiser
said. “Most of the diplomatic
institutions of higher learning are
in the east coast and the west coast,
and there wasn’t anything in the

central part of the country … and I
feel the central part of the country
has a great deal of importance.”

PUBLIC HEALTH
Former National Security Advisor

discusses current era of diplomacy

Talk also hosts European and Eurasian Affairs rep, CEO of US Global Leadership Coalition

MADELINE MCLAUGHLIN
Daily Staff Reporter

The University of Michigan
School
of
Information,
in
collaboration
with
the
Problem
Solving
Initiative
at the Law School and the
College
of
Engineering’s
Center
for
Socially
Engaged Design, hosted a
Multidisciplinary Design Jam
Friday
afternoon,
inviting
over 30 student participants
to
collaboratively
envision
new
ideas
for
improving
water safety in the Great
Lakes.
The students, mainly from
the School of Information,
were split into six teams
and
spent
the
afternoon
brainstorming,
refining
and presenting their ideas.

Design jam
addresses
Great Lakes
water safety

RESEARCH

Collaborative teams
seek out novel solutions

ALICE TRACEY
Daily Staff Reporter

MICHAEL BAGAZINSKI/Daily
Stephen Hadley, former National Security Advisor, speaks about the necessity of diplomacy at the Diplomacy in a New
Transatlantic Era discussion at Weill Hall Friday.

Parting words
Senior tight end Nick
Eubanks opened up about
how his mother’s passing
impacted his upbringing.
» Page 1B

National
Sanitation
Foundation
International
commemorated
its
75th
anniversary with a celebratory
event
at
its
international
headquarters in Ann Arbor on
Friday afternoon.
Eighteen guests spoke at
the celebration, including Sen.
Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich.; Rep.
Debbie Dingell, D-Mich.; state
Rep. Rebekah Warren, D-Ann
Arbor; and state Sen. Jeff Irwin,
D-Ann Arbor.
The University of Michigan
School of Public Health founded
NSF International in 1944 to
standardize sanitation and food
safety requirements.

Lawmakers celebrate
NSF’s anniversary

BARBARA COLLINS
Daily Staff Reporter

Read more at
MichiganDaily.com

Climate strike
demonstrators
appear in court
ahead of trial

Protesters charged with trespassing
at Fleming called for pretrial hearing

Students, activists voice concerns
during sit-in at Rep. Dingell’s office

Sunrise Movement pushes Green New Deal, environmental actions

LIAT WEINSTEIN
Daily Staff Reporter

ALEXIS RANKIN
Daily Staff Reporter

ALEXIS RANKIN/Daily
Leah Skylar, Chair of the Young Democrats of Michigan, speaks during the sit-in at Rep. Debbie Dingell’s Ypsilanti office as part of the Sunrise Movement’s action to demand
Dingell support the Green New Deal in Ypsilanti Friday afternoon.

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

INDEX
Vol. CXXVIII, No. 131
©2019 The Michigan Daily

N E WS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

O PI N I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

CL A SSIFIEDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6

M I C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

A R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

S P O R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 B
michigandaily.com

For more stories and coverage, visit
Follow The Daily
on Instagram,
@michigandaily

See WATER SAFETY, Page 2A

Six
demonstrators
who
were
charged
with
trespassing during a sit-in at
the Fleming Administration
Building following the March
Climate
Strike
appeared
in court for their pretrial
hearing
Friday
morning.
The hearing was meant to
simplify the facts of the case
and discuss the evidence
presented before Oct. 10,
when the official motion is
scheduled to take place.
According to Ann Arbor
attorney
Angie
Martell,
who
is
representing
all
demonstrators, two of those
charged were out of state at
the time of the hearing.
On
June
17,
six
demonstrators
appeared
in court for the first time.
They were arraigned and
pleaded not guilty to the
trespassing charges, which
bear a maximum charge of a
$250 fine with or without 30
days in jail. During the June
hearing, the demonstrators
were released on a personal
recognizance bond, meaning
they did not have to pay bail.
They were told they cannot
enter the Fleming building;
use alcohol, marijuana or
other illegal drugs; or leave

the state without permission
of the court.
In light of the upcoming
Jewish
holidays,
Circuit
Court Judge Karen Quinlan
Valvo, who presided over
Friday’s
hearing,
lifted
the ban on alcohol for the
demonstrators who are over
21.
After the Climate Strike
on March 15, during which
an
estimated
2,500-3,000
students,
faculty
and
community members rallied
on
the
Diag
in
protest
against inaction relating to
matters of climate change,
demonstrators
flooded
University President Mark
Schlissel’s
office
in
the
Fleming building for a seven-
and-a-half-hour sit-in. The
demonstrators’ chief demand
was a one-hour meeting with
Schlissel and other members
of
the
administration
to
discuss the University’s plan
to achieve carbon neutrality.
A group of demonstrators
refused to leave until the
University addressed their
demands,
leading
to
the
arrests of 10 individuals on
charges of trespassing — two
of whom were minors.

Read more at
MichiganDaily.com

Read more at
MichiganDaily.com

Students and activists of the
Sunrise Movement held a sit-in
at the Ypsilanti office of U.S.
Rep Debbie Dingell, D-Mich,
where they shared stories,
sang, chanted and expressed
their
concerns
about
the
impact of climate change to
her staffers present in the
office, occupying the space
past business hours.
Sunrise,
a
movement
of
predominantly young people
whose goal is to stop climate
change and create green jobs,
has chapters across the nation
and is a champion of the Green
New Deal, introduced by Rep.
Alexandria
Ocasio-Cortez,
D-N.Y. The Ann Arbor hub
of Sunrise has been trying to

convince Dingell to co-sponsor
the Green New Deal since
February, but has not yet been
successful.
LSA
junior
Preston
VanAlstine, one of the Ann
Arbor Hub coordinators, said
Dingell has been opposed to
the idea of co-sponsoring the
bill, and Sunrise has responded
accordingly.
“She’s been really resistant,
so we’ve been slowly escalating
in terms of our actions over the
past few months,” VanAlstine
said. “This election season
alone she’s taken over $10,000
from DTE, which gets two-
thirds of its energy from coal.
So we want her to stop taking
money from them as well.”
The group of about 30
protesters,
which
included
University of Michigan and

high
school
students
and
community
members
from
across
Washtenaw
County,
marched to her office holding
signs
saying
“We
Demand
a Future” and “Green Jobs
for All” where they filled up
the lobby of the office while
three of her staffers watched
and listened to the different
stories, demands, songs and
chants.
Many of those who spoke
during the sit-in cited the
economic
benefits
of
the
Green New Deal as something
important to them, connecting
it to their own experiences
and
how
they
have
been
impacted by climate change.
LSA sophomore Arya Kale, an
active member of the Sunrise
Movement, spoke about his
time volunteering in a soup

kitchen where he met a young
girl whose father had lost his
job at General Motors Corp.
Kale felt an instant connection
because
GM
employed
his
father as well.
“I don’t believe that people
of Black or Brown communities
should have to suffer without
having a job,” Kale said. “I
don’t believe that children
should not know where their
next meal is coming from
because their parents don’t
have work. And with the Green
New Deal, with the federal job
guarantee that’s written in it
— Representative Dingell, have
you read that part? — that’s
important, that’s why we need
a Green New Deal.”

Read more at
MichiganDaily.com

National
Sanitation
Foundation
turns 75

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