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August 15, 2019 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily

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3

Thursday, August 15, 2019
The Michigan Daily — michigandaily.com NEWS

After 14 weeks of work-
ing on various projects,
students
in
the
2019
Information and Technol-
ogy Services Internship
Cohort lined the Michigan
League with posters at the
ITS Internship Showcase
on Friday. The showcase
featured a poster session, a
student panel and closing
remarks from Ravi Pendse,
vice president for informa-
tion technology and chief
information officer.
This year, the Intern-
ship Cohort was com-
prised of 47 university
and high school students.
While many were from the
University of Michigan,
there were also students
from University of South-
ern California, Michigan
State University and sur-
rounding Ann Arbor high
schools.
DePriest
Dockins,
co-chairman of the ITS
Internship planning com-
mittee, stated there was

a jump in the number of
applicants this year.
“We went from about
130 the previous year to
320 this year,” Dockins
said. “We were aston-
ished.”
According to Dockins,
many students selected
stood out in enthusiasm
and ability to grow. Dock-
ins stated many of the
candidates come in with
little to no hands-on expe-
rience, so the program
administrators hope the
ITS Internship provides
interns with the perfect
complement to their strong
academic background.
Diane
Jones,
execu-
tive director of operations
in ITS, serves as a spon-
sor for the program and
worked with the planning
committee to expand and
improve
the
program.
This year, Jones explained
they integrated the Wol-
verine Pathways Program
to introduce high school
students to technology-
oriented fields. The Wol-
verine Pathways Program
is a free local program

that helps seventh through
12th grade students pre-
pare for college.
“We’re
hugely
proud
that we’re able to contrib-
ute to that and bring stu-
dents from surrounding
areas,” Jones said. “The
Wolverine Pathway Pro-
gram is so important to
helping students under-
stand how to manage life.”
Tamariah Davis is a
senior at Ypsilanti Com-
munity High School and
was a participant of the
Wolverine Pathway Pro-
gram. She said she learned
how to use adobe, man-
age responsibilities and
become more self confi-
dent.
“I’m
very
undecided
about what I want to do in
life,” Davis said. “I want to
be a nurse, I want to be in
ITS, I want to be a teach-
er, I want to be so many
things … This helped me
narrow down what I want-
ed to do.”
Michigan
State
Uni-
versity senior Raisa Mor-
rison worked on creating
the ITS Intern Portal to

improve
and
centralize
intern communication. As
an English major, she said
she was able to apply what
she learned in classes to
being the project manager
for her group.
“Being nontechnical, I
was really nervous,” Mor-
rison said. “But they create
a lot of space for technical
and
non-technical
stu-
dents.”
LSA senior Joseph Lisi,
on the other hand, was
exposed to many different
experiences that improved
his technical skills. He
worked on a project about
significant incident auto-
mation to improve the
coordination and respon-
siveness to various infor-
mation
and
technology
issues.
“I was able to take a
professional business pro-
cess and learn about it and
learn how to improve it,”
Lisi said. “It’s not really
stuff you can learn in
school.”

Visitors to Ann Arbor City
Hall last Monday were greet-
ed by a new front desk staffed
by an unarmed, private secu-
rity guard, where they will
now need to check in to gain
access to the third through
sixth floors. Two days later,
the University of Michigan
began installing door locks to
all classrooms and class labs
in Mason Hall — the site of a
false active shooter scare last
semester — as part of a pilot
project to enhance security
and emergency preparedness
campuswide.
Though planned for ahead
of time, both projects were
coincidentally implemented
the week after a string of
mass shootings — two less
than 24 hours apart in El
Paso, Texas, and Dayton,
Ohio, and one earlier in the
week in Gilroy, Calif. — in
which more than 32 people
were killed.
According to the Gun Vio-
lence Archive, as of August
5 there have been 255 mass
shootings
in
the
United
States this year — a rate of
more than one per day. Soon
after, the governments of
Venezuela and Uruguay and
Amnesty International all
released travel advisories,
warning those visiting the
U.S. of the high levels of gun
violence.
In
response
to
these
national trends, institutions
in Ann Arbor are also taking
precautions. Though inde-
pendent of one another, the
two back-to-back projects
share a common purpose:
to protect people frequent-
ing the buildings from vio-
lent threats and emergencies
as mass shootings become

deadlier nationwide.
University door-lock proj-
ect
The door-lock project is
being led by the Division of
Public Safety and Security.
Working with a team from
the University’s Architec-
ture, Engineering and Con-
struction
division,
DPSS
plans to finish the locks by
the end of August so the
classrooms can still be used
in the fall.
According to a Univer-
sity press release, the pilot
project will guide University
administration in exploring
the scope and process of
installing door locks to class-
rooms campuswide. DPSS
Executive Director Eddie L.
Washington Jr. noted Mason
Hall was chosen as the first
location due to its proximity
to the Diag.
“The safety of students, fac-
ulty, staff and visitors is our top
priority,” Washington Jr. said.
“This project is part of our
broader efforts to continuously
identify technology, enhance
alerting and implement train-
ing to ensure the safety and
security of our community.”
In an email to The Daily,
University
spokesperson
Rick Fitzgerald explained
Mason Hall was chosen as the
pilot location in part because
it was the site of the scare,
but also since it is an LSA and
central campus building used
by many undergraduates.
Heather
Young,
DPSS
director of strategic commu-
nications, emphasized the
decision to implement door
locks in Mason Hall is not
directly related to the March
incident, as she explained
talks between LSA and DPSS
began in December.

City, ‘U’ add

new security
in buildings

Mason Hall gets door locks, City Hall
receives security guards and front desk

COURTESY OF FRANCESCA DUONG

Read more at michigandaily.com

Interns present work at
annual technology event

CLAIRE HAO
Summer News Editor

FRANCESCA DUONG
Daily Staff Reporter

Read more at michigandaily.com

Students share projects, take part in panel during ITS open house

2019 Information and Technology Services Internship Cohort students present at the ITS Internship Showcase in the Michigan League Friday.

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