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August 15, 2019 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily

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Thursday, August 15, 2019

INDEX

Vol. CXXVIII, No. 122
© 2019 The Michigan Daily

NEWS ....................................
OPINION ...............................
ARTS......................................
MiC.........................................
SPORTS................................

MICHIGAN IN COLOR
‘Mother of the sea’

Ana Maria Sanchez-Castillo

shares a poem on her multi-

cultural identities connecting

with the religion of Santeria


>> SEE PAGE 9

NEWS
Admissions

Kedra Ishop and Erica Sand-

ers discuss the application

process and incoming class


>> SEE PAGE 2

OPINION
Welcome back

Olivia Turano gives her

insights to “welcome

week”


>> SEE PAGE 4

ARTS
Jia Tolentino

Acclaimed New Yorker

writer to speak on her

literary debut “Trick Mirror”

at Literati Book Store
>> SEE PAGE 6

SPORTS
Soccer

FC Barcelona cruises past

SSC Napoli 4-0 in weekend

game held at the Big House


>> SEE PAGE 12

inside

2
4
6
9
10

Alumni call for
separation from
Stephen M. Ross

Stephen M. Ross, the New
York-based real estate mogul
who is the largest donor in
University of Michigan history
and namesake of the School of
Business, has faced backlash from
University alumni and on social
media following his decision to
host a reelection fundraiser for
President Donald Trump in his
Southampton home.
Following reports of Ross’s
scheduled fundraiser — with
tickets ranging from $100,000
to $250,000 — he was trending
on Twitter, with many calling
for the boycott of SoulCycle
and Equinox, two luxury gym
companies owned by Ross.
Ross, whose net worth is
estimated at about $7.7 billion,
also owns football team the
Miami Dolphins. In a statement to
the Miami Herald, Ross defended
his fundraiser, explaining he
and Trump agree on some issues
but “strongly disagree on many

others.”
“I started my business with
nothing and a reason for my
engagement with our leaders is
my deep concern for creating
jobs and growing our company’s
economy,” Ross wrote. “I have
been,
and
will
continue
to
be,
an
outspoken
champion
of
racial
equality,
inclusion,
diversity, public education and
environmental sustainability.”
SoulCycle and Equinox also
released statements affirming
their commitment to diversity
and tolerance. Both companies
emphasized they do not endorse
the event and said Ross is a
passive investor uninvolved in
management.
However,
some
on
social
media
continued
to
cancel
membership
to
the
two
businesses and still condemned
Ross’ support of Trump, citing
the president’s rhetoric as racist,
misogynistic and homophobic.
Among Ross’ critics are former
Hillary Clinton advisor Phillippe
Reines, model Chrissy Teigen,
actor Sophia Bush and actor Billy
Eichner.
In particular, Miami Dolphins
receiver Kenny Stills suggested
Ross’ support for Trump is
contradictory to the mission
statement
of
RISE,
a
non-
profit
Ross
founded
aiming
to “educate and empower the

sports community to eliminate
racial discrimination, champion
social justice and improve race
relations.”
University
community
members have also shared their
concerns about the fundraiser
to the Ross School of Business,
prompting Dean Scott DeRue to
send an email to students, faculty
and staff in response. DeRue
said the school does not endorse
or support this fundraiser or
any others for any political
candidates.
The email emphasized the
school’s
values
of
diversity
and inclusion as well as civic
responsibility.
In
upholding
these values, DeRue wrote the
importance of listening to and
working with people holding
different opinions is key to the
democratic process.
“I want to close by saying that
we, as an educational institution
built
on
these
core
values,
reject all attempts to divide
our community,” DeRue wrote.
“We are strong because of our
diversity, and hate has no place in
our society. At Michigan Ross, we
rise above hateful rhetoric and
live the values we aspire to. It is
the Michigan way, and it is the
way we will create a better world,
together.”

City sees rise
in absentee
ballots cast

Clerk anticipates
more absentee ballots in
future due to passing of
Proposal 3

Ann Arbor experienced a 22 percent
increase in absentee voting during
the Aug. 6 election, data from the city
shows. Deputy City Clerk Steve Gerhart
said his office did not experience a
major influx of activity, despite the the
increase in voting through alternative
routes.
In November 2018, Michigan passed
Proposal 3, which allows all eligible
voters to cast an absentee ballot
without explicit justification. Nearly a
year since its passage, Ann Arbor has
already begun to see its effects.
Prior to the proposal’s passage,
absentee voting was limited to those
over 60, those unable to get to the
polls because they were out of town or
prohibited by religious circumstance,
those awaiting arraignment or trial,
those who could not vote without
assistance and those who were working
to coordinate the election outside their
precinct. The Aug. 6 election was the
first sense the passing of Proposal 3.
Gerhart attributed the increased
absentee voting to registration done
online or over the course of months
leading up to the actual election. All
Ann Arbor registered voters are able to
request an absentee ballot from the city
clerk’s office beginning 75 days prior to
any election and extending until the
Monday prior. Voters need not fill out
a formal request. Ann Arbor absentee
ballots can be requested in person, over
the phone or by email.
When
retrieving
absentee
ballots from the city clerk’s office,
recipients are subject to the same
voter identification laws as all other
Michiganders. Applicants presenting
requests within 14 days of the election
will be required to show proof of
residency.

ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-EIGHT YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

Read more at michigandaily.com

MELANIE TAYLOR
Summer News Editor

Read more at michigandaily.com

michigandaily.com

‘U’ community weighs in on
Ross fundraiser for Trump

FILE PHOTO
Stephen M. Ross speaks at an event.

CLAIRE HAO &
SAMANTHA SMALL
Summer News Editors

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