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June 06, 2019 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily

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Thursday, June 6, 2019

INDEX

Vol. CXXVIII, No. 108
© 2019 The Michigan Daily

NEWS ....................................
OPINION ...............................
ARTS/NEWS..........................
MiC.........................................
SPORTS................................

MICHIGAN IN COLOR
Pride Month

Dierra Barlow reflects on

queer indentity, person

journey in during world-

wide LGBTQ+ celebration


>> SEE PAGE 9

NEWS
2020

Democratic presidential

candidates make campaign

stops in Detroit

>> SEE PAGE 8

OPINION

Abortion rights

Ramisa Rob addresses

considerations for pro-life

conservatives


>> SEE PAGE 4

ARTS
Governor’s Ball

The 1975 and Florence

+ the Machine rock the

annual New York City

music festival
>> SEE PAGE 7

SPORTS
New leadership

Michigan basketball coach

Juwan Howard was intro-

duced on Thursday


>> SEE PAGE 11

inside

2
4
6
9
10

Researchers hope
work sheds light
on experiences of
LGBT workers

LGBT
federal
workers
reported worse experiences at
their offices compared to their
non-LGBT colleagues, reports
a study conducted by assistant
professor of sociology Erin Cech
and Rackham student William
Rothwell. This disparity tends
to lead to higher turnover
intentions, Cech and Rothwell
claim.
In an email to The Daily,
Rothwell said he and Cech
started
the
study
in
2014
because they were inspired by
data from the Federal Employee
Viewpoint
Survey.
Rothwell
hoped
their
work
would
bring light to the unobserved
discrimination
of
LGBT
individuals.
“We knew that there were
likely important and interesting
stories that we could tell with
this data,” Rothwell wrote. “I
think that these findings, in
general, are especially daunting

given that federal agencies and
workers are actually protected
under
non-discrimination
legislation meaning that these
results may provide a somewhat
conservative estimate of the
extent
of
LGBT
workplace
inequality more broadly.”
According to the Federal
Trade Commission, the Equal
Employment
Opportunity
Commission enforces laws that
make it unlawful for federal
agencies to discriminate against
employees and job applicants.
Rothwell said it is rare to
come across data on LGBT
populations,
but
they
were
able to work with the FEVS
data of 300,000 respondents
because about 11,000 of those
respondents identified as LGBT.
Cech also noted their study uses
the “LGBT” acronym because
the FEVS survey contained
questions that captured LGBT
status. She added the “LGBTQ+”
acronym is more fully inclusive
of gender nonbinary and queer
persons and was disappointed
these
identities
were
not
accounted for.
The researchers also found
LGBT workers reported feeling
their work was less respected by
their supervisors and non
LGBT
peers.
Cech
and
Rothwell
concluded
these
processes
are
intersectional

with LGBT women and people
of
color,
as
they
reported
significantly
more
negative
experiences than LGBT men
and white workers.
Although
equality
for
LGBT-identifying persons has
increased over the last three
decades, Cech said she has
seen greater instances of hate
speech toward LGBT persons
within the last five years. She
added this study took place in
a federal workforce with non-
discrimination policies in place,
so their conclusions may have
been equal or worse in other
employment sectors.
“Little research, up until
this point, has been able to
systematically document how
LGBT persons are impacted
by
more
subtle
day-to-day
experiences of devaluation and
marginalization at work,” Cech
said. “We hope this study gives
visibility to these issues and
voice to LGBT persons who
encounter these issues at work.”
LSA and Music, Theatre &
Dance senior Dylan Genouw,
a
member
of
the
LGBT
community, said in an email to
The Daily he noticed gender and
sexuality-based discrimination
in his restaurant job.

Former priest

charged with
sexual assault
of minor in A2

Ex-St. Thomas priest
Timothy Crowley
faces up to life in
prison if convicted

Timothy M. Crowley, a former priest at St.
Thomas the Apostle Catholic Church in Ann
Arbor, was arrested on May 23 in Tempe, AZ,
according to Maricopa County jail records.
The next day, Michigan Attorney General
Dana Nessel announced Crowley was one
of five Michigan Catholic priests her office
charged with criminal sexual misconduct.
Crowley, 69, was charged in Washtenaw
County with four felony counts of first-
degree criminal sexual conduct, with a
maximum sentence of life in prison, and four
counts of second-degree criminal sexual
conduct, with a maximum sentence of 15
years in prison. He is accused of assaulting
a minor boy for about eight years while at St.
Thomas from 1987 to 1990.
The charges come after months of
investigation into sexual abuse by Michigan
clergy inside the Catholic Church. The
investigation was started in August 2018
by Nessel’s predecessor, former Attorney
General Bill Schuette, following a report
exposing widespread sexual abuse in the
Pennsylvania Catholic Church.
All charges against Crowley fall within
the statute of limitations because he
has not been a Michigan resident since
1995. Prosecutors will move ahead with
proceedings.
According to Nessel, all five cases began
as tips from the Attorney General’s sexual
abuse hotline, which she said has received
more than 450 tips. The tips were then
corroborated by interviews with victims
and information found in the hundreds
of thousands of documents seized from
Michigan’s seven Catholic dioceses last
October.

ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-EIGHT YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

Read more at michigandaily.com

CLAIRE HAO
Summer News Editor

MICHAL RUPRECHT
Daily Staff Reporter

Read more at michigandaily.com

michigandaily.com

‘U’ study finds LGBT employees
feel less supported at federal jobs

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