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February 18, 2019 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily

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Winterfest, a tournament-style
annual philanthropic event where
different members of fraternities and
sororities play broomball for charity,
will be hosted on Feb 23 by the Pi
Kappa Alpha fraternity (PIKE). Last
year, Winterfest was hosted on the
property of PIKE and sponsored
by Alpha Sigma Phi, but after Alpha
Sigma Phi was banned from campus,
PIKE picked up the event.
Fraternities who are members
of
the
Interfraternity
Council
and sororities in the Panhellenic
Association
can
participate
by
donating money to play in the

tournament. The money raised will
be donated to the Autism Alliance of
Michigan. As of Sunday evening, the
general Winterfest campaign has
raised over 29,000 dollars of their
60,000 dollar goal.
While Alpha Sigma Phi has
hosted the event in the past, the
Interfraternity
Council
recently
banned Alpha Sigma Phi from
campus for five years after it was
discovered
several
generations
of its members had participated
in dangerous hazing incidents,
according to Dean of Students Laura
Blake Jones. One alleged incident
involved a ‘40-yard dash’ across
new members’ backs.

On
Saturday
morning,
Michigan Health Engineered
for All Lives (M-HEAL) and
Timmy
Global
Health
at
the University of Michigan
hosted their annual Global
Health Symposium. Around
85 students and faculty were
in attendance.
The event featured Abdul
El-Sayed, 2018 gubernatorial
candidate and former Health
Director of Detroit; Yuan-
Po Tu, Center for Disease
Control public health analyst;
and Business junior Anurag
Bolneni, CFO of Blueprints
For Pangaea.
Each
year,
M-HEAL
and the Michigan chapter
of
Timmy
Global
Health

co-host the event with the
goal of bringing awareness
to global health issues and
encouraging
students
to
explore
interdisciplinary
ways
to
address
these
problems. Both groups focus
on
improving
access
and
quality of healthcare on a
global scale.
El-Sayed
opened
the
symposium with a speech
about privilege, institutions
and morality in the field of
public health. Throughout
the speech he referenced his
grandmother as an example
of a woman who, despite her
lack of access to institutions,
inspires him with her moral
clarity.
El-Sayed cited the gap in
life expectancy he witnessed
growing
up
between
his

hometown
in
Bloomfield
Hills,
Michigan
and
Alexandria,
Egypt,
where
his
grandmother
lived,
and the similar gap twenty
minutes away in Detroit, as
his inspiration for getting
involved in public health.
“I was motivated by the
responsibility
to
leverage
the
privilege
that
my
grandmother
so
clearly
highlighted that I have to
address that gap,” El-Sayed
said.
He urged the audience to
consider their own privileges
and stressed the importance
of
thinking
outside
of
institutions and holding onto
one’s ideals.
“Increments matter. Ideals
matter more,” El-Sayed said.
“And the question we ask

ourselves in these moments is
whether or not we are moving
forward on those ideals…
sometimes the greatest moral
clarity comes when you act
independent of institutions,
like my grandmother. So work
hard in these institutions,
move
these
institutions,
but be guided by ideals that
are far greater than these
institutions.”
Engineering
senior
Ashley Zhang, the M-HEAL
marketing officer, told The
Daily in an interview after the
event she was enthusiastic
about having El-Sayed speak
at the event.

On
Feb.
5,
Sen.
Debbie
Stabenow,
D-MI,
sponsored
legislation to protect funding
for the Great Lakes that she
claims would be siphoned off
by President Trump to build a
physical wall along the southern
border. The bill was a preemptive
response to a declaration of a
national
emergency
President
Trump announced on Friday after
failing to corral Congress into
funding a wall.
Stabenow’s bill, the RAIDER
Act of 2019, seeks to prevent the
president from using funds from
the Army Corps of Engineers and
Military Construction accounts
to finance a border wall without
the
permission
of
Congress.
According
to
the
National
Emergencies Act, these agencies
contain the funds that are most
at risk of being redirected under a
national emergency.say
In a press release published
by Stabenow’s office, she claims
that construction of a border
wall would reduce funds for
“vital Michigan infrastructure

michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Monday, February 18, 2019

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-EIGHT YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

Hosting of
Winterfest
generates
contention

Nomination process for police
oversight board sparks controversy

CAMPUS LIFE

Panhel changes decision on participation
after worries regarding policy violation

Changes to commission membership elicit discussion among City Councilmembers

City
Councilmembers
and
community activists are divided
over two agenda items slated to
appear before the City Council
Tuesday
night
regarding

the formation of an independent
police oversight commission. One
calls for changes to the guidelines
for commission membership while
the other seeks to prohibit undue
influence over the nomination
process.
Councilmember
Elizabeth
Nelson, D-Ward 5, is sponsoring the
resolution to block what she called

“inappropriate” involvement on
behalf of officials who are not
among the four liaisons designed
to aid in selecting potential
nominees to the commission. In
December, Nelson attempted to
replace
Councilmember
Jane
Lumm, I-Ward 2, as one of two
City Council liaisons to the police
oversight commission.

“I feel like I’m sort of in the
middle of it because I am bringing
this resolution and this resolution is
apparently like completely opposite
to the direction that everybody else
going and I really tried hard to be
among those four people and I sort
of went down in flames,” Nelson said.

See OVERSIGHT, Page 2

LEAH GRAHAM &
CATHERINE NOUHAN
Daily News Editor & Daily Staff
Reporter

Ex-Obama
official talks
science and
technology

CAMPUS LIFE

Thomas Kalil discussed
policy, former initiatives
at Ford School event

Annual Global Health Symposium
hosts former gubernatorial candidate

Student organizations bring awareness to quality of healthcare world-wide, solutions

ANGELINA LITTLE
For The Daily

Bounceback
Wolverines recover from
worst loss of the season at
Penn State with suffocating
65-52 win over Maryland

on Saturday» Page 1B

On Friday, the Ford School
of Public Policy held the most
recent of their Policy Talks
@ the Ford School. The event
featured Thomas Kalil, former
deputy director for policy at the
White House Office of Science
and Technology Policy under
former President Barack Obama.
Kalil gave a presentation on
U.S. science and technology
policy and answered questions
submitted by the audience.
Kalil began by discussing
his
role
in
the
Obama
administration and described
two distinct aspects of his job:
science
and
technology
for
policy and policy for science
and technology. When focusing
on science and technology for
policy, Khalil’s job was advising
the president.
“When making a decision that
had a scientific or technological
component,” Khalil said. “Then
our job was to make sure he
was getting the best possible
advice.”

Stabenow
introduces
act to stop
border wall

GOVERNMENT

Legislation aims to protect
funding for Great Lakes in
light of national emergency

ZAYNA SYED
Daily Staff Reporter

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

INDEX
Vol. CXXVIII, No. 75
©2019 The Michigan Daily

N E WS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

O PI N I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

A R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

S U D O K U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

CL A S S I F I E DS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

S P O R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 B
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CARTER FOX/Daily
2018 Gubernatorial candidate and former Health Director of Detroit, Dr. Abdul El-Sayed, speaks about his inspiration to make longterm impacts on global health
throughout his life at Rackham Graduate School Saturday.

Follow The Daily
on Instagram,
@michigandaily

RACHEL CUNNINGHAM &
CALLIE TEITELBAUM
Daily News Editor & Daily Staff
Reporter

EMMA RUBBERG
For The Daily

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