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December 05, 2018 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily

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Three students have been

awarded
the
prestigious

Marshall
and
Schwarzman

scholarships
to
pursue

graduate studies at universities
in the United Kingdom and
China during the upcoming
academic year.

LSA
seniors
Amanda

Burcroff and Noah McNeal
won the Marshall Scholarship,
which
provides
up
to
50

students from across the United
States full funding to study at
any U.K. institution in any field
of choice. Business and LSA
senior Eduardo Batista became
the first University of Michigan

student to win the Schwarzman
Scholarship,
which
was

created in 2016. According to
the website, the Schwarzman
Scholarship
offers
students

interested in global affairs
the chance to study at China’s
Tsinghua University.

Burcroff
and
McNeal

became the University’s 8th
and 9th Marshall Scholarship
winners, and are the first
winners since 2013. A press
release
published
Monday

afternoon by the Marshall
Scholarship
Program
said

the 48 scholars were chosen
from a pool of over 1,000
applicants. The winners will
join an accomplished alumni
base including Supreme Court

Bird –– the scooter-sharing

company that took Ann Arbor
and the University of Michigan’s
campus by storm this fall ––
says it will continue to operate
during the winter, depending
on daily weather conditions.

A
Bird
spokesperson

confirmed
the
company’s

intentions to let the public
proceed with riding through
the winter months, but added
that the vehicles could be
removed if inclement weather
were to occur.

“Bird is extremely committed

to the safety of our riders, and
so we take into account the
weather conditions of each city
where Bird is available,” a Bird
spokesperson wrote in an email
to The Daily.

The spokesperson said Bird

has a monitoring team that
reviews riding conditions and
determines
whether
roads

are safe for use each day, and
oftentimes the service will
pause riding when weather is
not permitting, such as during
storms or hurricanes. When
there’s a threat of blizzards
or icy roads, the company
investigates to deem whether
the driving environment is safe.
Bird’s statement still leaves
uncertainty
as
to
whether

the Bird scooters will, in fact,
completely migrate south for
the winter.

Scooter
usage
has
been

hotly contested ever since they
arrived in Ann Arbor this past
September. After the scooters’
initial deployment, the city of
Ann Arbor temporarily removed
nearly two dozen scooters for
violating city ordinances that
require motorized vehicles not
to interfere with the public
right-of-way.
According
to

Lisa
Wondrash,
the
city’s

communications director, Ann
Arbor has had many Bird-

related violations, but only
one has been reported and
confirmed to have resulted
in an injury attributable to a
Bird scooter. Since the initial
crackdown,
a
total
of
44

scooters have been impounded.

Backlash
from
the
local

government’s decision to seize
the scooters led to an agreement
passed in November with Bird
Rides, Inc. that requires the
company to pay a fee to the

city of Ann Arbor, provide
educational materials to its
users and assume liability for
improper driving or parking of
the vehicles.

“The
City
Council
has

provided their policy direction
regarding Bird and scooter
share companies, which is
that we should allow them to
operate insofar as they can be
operated safely and they can

A new study on the use of

diversity statements in hiring
at the University of Michigan
was recently conducted at the
University’s National Center for
Institutional Diversity. The study
served to analyze the effects
of new and evolving practices
in faculty hiring in higher
education.

Diversity
statements
are

written pieces of an application
in which the applicant explains
the
ways
their
background,

experience,
scholarship,

mentoring and other previous
work can contribute to campus
efforts to promote diversity,
equity
and
inclusion.
The

statements are requested from
candidates
for
some
faculty

positions at the University and
increasingly at institutions of
higher
education
across
the

country.

Prof. Tabbye Chavous, director

of NCID, co-authored the paper.
Chavous said the purpose of
the study was to gain a more
thorough understanding of how
candidates and faculty used the

michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Wednesday, December 5, 2018

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-EIGHT YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

Scholarships
send three
students to
China, U.K.

Audubon vice president reflects
on environmental equity, diversity

See SCHOLARSHIPS, Page 3A

PRASHANTH PANICKER/Daily

Dr. Deeohn Ferris, Audubon vice president, speaks about environmental justice, equity and law at the Dana building Tuesday.

ACADEMICS

Prestigious Marshall and Schwarzman
awards provide graduate opportunities

LIAT WEINSTEIN

Daily Staff Reporter

School for Environment and Sustainability hosts lecture for DEI speaker series

Deeohn Ferris, vice president

for
Equity,
Diversity
and

Inclusion at National Audubon
Society, presented Tuesday at
the University of Michigan’s
School for Environment and

Sustainability on initiatives to
increase diversity, equity and
inclusion in the environmental
conservation field. The lecture
was organized through the
University’s Diversity, Equity
and Inclusion program as a
part of the “DEI December
Presentation:
Environmental

Justice, Equity and Law.”

The National Audubon Society

is
a
nonprofit
conservation

organization with a mission
to protect bird and wildlife
habitats.
Audubon
policy,

education and science experts
provide guidance to lawmakers
to shape conservation actions
and policies.

In Ferris’s first job as a

lawyer for the Environmental
Protection Agency, she and
her
colleagues
looked
into

patterns of the locations of
companies who did not comply
with regulations. Everywhere
they had a case, Ferris and
her
colleagues
determined

people
of
color
and
low-

CALLIE TEITELBAUM

Daily Staff Reporter

See DIVERSITY, Page 3A

‘U’ study
evaluates
diversity
statements

ADMINISTRATION

New hiring requirements
in higher education “a
really promising practice”

RILEY LANGEFELD

Daily Staff Reporter

MILES MACKLIN/Daily

Bird says it will continue to operate during the Winter, depending on daily weather conditions.

Bird scooters will not fly south for
winter weather, company announces

Licensing agreement with city requires company to assume liability for improper use

CHRISTOPHER SULLIVAN

Daily Staff Reporter

The Sex Issue

The Statement Magazine
dives into the results of its

annual sex survey

» Page 3B

See BIRD, Page 2A

See AUDUBON, Page 3A

The
University
of

Michigan
Central
Student

Government
met
Tuesday

night to introduce and discuss
the NET plan — narrative,
equity and transformation — an
inclusivity program to enhance
diversity and inclusion among
student
organizations
on

campus.

The NET plan is part of the

University’s commitment to
increasing
diversity,
equity

and inclusion on campus.

Public
Health
junior

Lloyd
Lyons,
a
diversity

peer educator, explained the
purpose of the NET plan.

“The NET plan is a narrative,

equity
and
transformation

program
within
student

organizations
on
campus,”

Lyons said. “This program was
created to fulfill the needs
that a lot of organizations felt
that they were missing, that
they didn’t have all voices
represented, and that they
didn’t have different people
within their organizations.”

Lyons said this program

See CSG, Page 3A

CSG talks
new NET
inclusivity
program

STUDENT GOVERNMENT

Assembly also introduced
fund to empower survivors
through SAPAC donation

ABIGAIL BERGER

For the Daily

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

INDEX
Vol. CXXVII, No. 45
©2018 The Michigan Daily

N E WS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

O PI N I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

A R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

S U D O K U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

CL A S S I F I E DS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

S P O R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
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THE MICHIGAN DAILY | NOVEMBER 21, 2018

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