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November 20, 2018 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily

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At the end of each semester,

University
of
Michigan

students are asked to submit
evaluations for the courses
they have taken in that term.
One of the most important
metrics
for
introductory-

level courses is how much
interest they generate in the
field. Rankings are based on
the percentage of students
who answered some form of
“yes” when asked, “Did this
course increase interest in
the field?” The top results for
introductory classes are listed
below:

ASIANLAN
125:
First

Year Japanese I (94 percent)

Ranked
highest
on
the

list, First Year Japanese I is
designed for students with no
prior Japanese knowledge and
focuses on the fundamentals
of learning a new language.
According to Mayumi Oka,
director
of
the
Japanese

language program, this first-
year course stresses several
key skills of the language.

“We do reading, writing,

speaking and listening,” Oka
said. “We teach everything
like conversation and how
to write characters, and we
introduce Japanese culture.
Culture is very important.”

The class focuses on an

understanding
of
Japanese

culture as well. According
to
Kinesiology
freshman

Xincheng
Yuan,
the
class

generates
interest
by

appealing to the U.S. interest
in different facets of Japanese
culture.

“I think Japanese culture

is popular in America with
anime and manga and those
games,” Yuan said. “I think
many people are trying to
learn about these in Japanese
to better play the things that
they like.”

LHSP
125:
College

Writing (88 percent)

With various sections of this

course including “Writing and
Seeing,” “Writing Genres,”
“Monsters and Beasts” and
more, this course in the
Lloyd Hall Scholars Program
offers several unique lenses
while also providing a base
of writing skills. According
to Shelley Mannis, professor
of “Our TV, Our Selves: The

Rhetoric
of
Television,”

the various sections allow
students to use writing to
analyze the world around
them.

“A big part of this course,

too, is helping students learn
how to find real conversations
happening
in
the
world

around things that they’re
interested in,” Mannis wrote
in an email to The Daily. “In

After
four
new

Councilmembers
were
sworn

into office Monday night, Ann
Arbor
City
Council
failed
a

resolution 7-4 to amend the Office
of Sustainability and Innovation’s
budget and appropriate funds for
new climate and sustainability
programs, and to scale-up existing
programs.

City
Councilmembers
Julie

Grand,
D-Ward
3,
Zachary

Ackerman, D-Ward 4, Chip Smith,
D-Ward 5 and Mayor Christopher
Taylor voted in favor of the
resolution.

The
failure
comes

after
the
resolution
was

first postponed during the Oct. 15
meeting in which councilmembers
could not come to a general
consensus on the issue.

Rackham
students
Jennifer

Carman and Samantha Basile are
both involved with climate change
action both in their studies and
participation
in
environmental

groups both on campus and within
Ann Arbor. Both Carman and
Basile are residents of Ward 1.
Basile said passing the resolution

michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Tuesday, November 20, 2018

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-EIGHT YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

INDEX
Vol. CXXVIII, No. 35
©2018 The Michigan Daily

N E WS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

O PI N I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

A R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

S U D O K U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

CL A S S I F I E DS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

S P O R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
michigandaily.com

For more stories and coverage, visit

CAMPUS LIFE

The Black Student Union

held an event and exhibit
in Mason Hall on Monday
to commemorate the fifth
anniversary
of
#BBUM,


which
stands
for
“Being

Black at the University of
Michigan.”
The
display

included a large poster where
students could share what
it means to be Black at the
University of Michigan in
colored chalk.

On
Nov.
19,
2013,

BSU
launched
a

movement
that
brought

Black students’ experiences
at the University to light,
with
the
viral
hashtag,

protest
and
institutional

demands. BBUM represents
a
watershed
moment
of

viral
student
activism
on

campus. A “hood ratchet”
party organized by Theta
Xi, a predominantly white
fraternity,
catalyzed
the

BSU’s launch of the hashtag

used in 10,000 tweets in its
first two days.

LSA
senior
Kayla

McKinney, president of BSU,
said the event was intended
to give students a space to
reflect on the past five years
since the hashtag began and
also on the history of Black
students at the University in
general.

“They did a demonstration

similar to this (five years
ago),” McKinney said. “This
was right after the Trayvon
Martin trial, racist incidents
on campus, so Black students
just needed a place to voice
what was going on.”

This dialogue gave way

to seven demands addressed
to
the
University.
Many


of
the
demands

most

notably,
the
perennial

ask for 10 percent Black
enrollment — are reiterations
of
changes
sought
by

previous
Black
Action

Movements. These reforms
include
more
affordable

housing, a revamped Race

Community
gathers to
reflect 5 yrs.
after BBUM

Gender identity explored through
performances at SHIFT showcase

NATALIE STEPHENS/Daily

Mandy Coterillo, Alumni Chair of Zeta Omega Eta and co-host of SHIFT hugs an attendee of SHIFT at the League Monday evening.

Black Student Union exhibit mirrors
original actions, demands from 2013

SAYALI AMIN
Daily Staff Reporter

200 people attend art event in League hosted by Redefine and Zeta Omega Eta

Featuring a mix of visual art,

written word and performances by
University of Michigan students
with a diverse range of gender
identities,
the
annual
SHIFT

talent showcase was held Monday
to explore and celebrate the theme
of gender.

Co-hosted by Redefine, a student

organization dedicated to creating
platforms for the intersection of art
and social justice, and Zeta Omega

Eta, a non-traditional sorority
focused on the advancement of
feminist ideals, the event first
allowed attendees to browse a wall
of visual art at the entrance of the
room that showcased drawings,
photographs, poetry and prose.
The artwork had a variety of
messages presenting the artists’
experiences of gender, from its
intersection with ethnicity to
societal gender pressures.

Kendall Sidnam, co-president of

Redefine and one of the organizers
of the event, emphasized the
mission of Redefine to provide a

space for artists at the University
to express themselves.

“To be able to have a safe

and brave space where they
can showcase their art without
judgment and with full support
and accessibility ... Having a space
that’s solely devoted to them and
their work and their talent is
really important for them to feel
supported in whatever identity
they have,” Sidnam said.

The organizers later shifted

into the performance portion
of event with a video asking
University students about genders

norms they’d like to see changed
and what gender empowerment
meant to them. Launching from
these ideas, one of the emcees, LSA
senior Mandy Coterillo, explained
the idea of the “gender unicorn” to
the audience.

“The
gender
unicorn
is

divided
into
gender
identity,

gender expression, sex assigned
at birth, physically attracted to,
and emotionally attracted to…”
Coterillo said. “The unicorn works
in a spectrum.”

The performances that followed

CLAIRE HAO

Daily Staff Reporter

The University of Michigan

Senate
Assembly
convened

Monday
afternoon
in
the

Michigan League to discuss
the implications of electronic
voting
and
participation
in

future meetings as well as what
responsibilities
University

faculty hold regarding letters of
recommendation.

After opening the meeting

with
announcements,
Senate

Assembly Chair Neil Marsh,
professor
of
chemistry,

opened the floor for discussion
about electronic voting and
participation in future Faculty
Senate
meetings.
Remote

participation would be achieved
through video chat platforms
like Bluejeans or Skype. The
discussion was a response to
concerns that quorums rarely
occur due to the participation
minimum
of
100
faculty

members. As a result, there
have only been three instances
in which a faculty quorum has
been able to vote on issues since
2004.

“We never get a quorum,

Assembly
expresses
support for
online vote

ACADEMICS

Faculty gov. also voices
concerns over clarity of
letter writing policies

SARAH THONG

For the Daily

DID THIS COURSE CAUSE INTEREST IN THE FIELD?

ASIANLAN 125

First Year Japanese I

LHSP 125

College Writing

DANCE 100

Intro to Dance

ARTDES 115

Studio: 2D

SPANISH 101

Elementary Spanish

EARTH 113

Planets and Moons

BIOLOGY 101

Energy, Food, & Environment

PSYCH 111

Intro to Psychology

COMPLI 100

Global X

EECS 183

Elem. Programming Concepts

ASTRO 127

Naked Eye Astronomy

ASTRO 107

The Dark Side of the Univ.

94%
88%
87%

82%
82%
82%

81%
80%
80%

79%
79%
79%

CASEY TIN/Daily

Course evaluation data reveal most
popular introductory-level classes

Twelve courses top list of those which most increase interest in subject matter

ATTICUS RAASCH

Daily Staff Reporter

See COURSES, Page 3

Resolution
for climate
funds fails
in Council

ANN ARBOR

Newly sworn in members
provide deciding votes
after hours-long debate

RACHEL CUNNINGHAM

Daily Staff Reporter

See COUNCIL, Page 3
See ASSEMBLY, Page 2

See SHIFT, Page 3
See BBUM, Page 3

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on Instagram,
@michigandaily

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