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October 12, 2018 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily

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Following the defeat of a
citizen task force’s proposal for
a police oversight commision at
a City Council meeting on Oct. 1,
legal questions remain regarding
aspects of the citizens’ draft and
changes in Ann Arbor Mayor
Christopher
Taylor’s
counter-
proposal.
The citizen task force drafted
a proposal that would create
a citizen-led police oversight
commission with the power to
subpoena records and officer
testimony, as well as the ability to
examine “any AAPD (Ann Arbor
Police Department) information
and records,” according to the
ordinance.
Calls for police oversight gained
momentum following the 2014
death of Aura Rosser, a mother
of three who was fatally shot by
Ann Arbor police officer David
Ried. City Council appointed
the task force in January to
offer recommendations for the
formation of an independent
commission to review the practices
of AAPD. The task force submitted

michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Friday, October 12, 2018

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-EIGHT YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

Over the last couple of years,
many standardized tests have
moved over to a digital formatting
system. Now, the last of the
graduate school admissions tests

— the Law School Admission Test
— joins them in this technological
advancement.
The Law School Admissions
Council declared the LSAT will
be a tablet-based administration
starting in July 2019. Instead of a
test booklet, students will receive

a Samsung tablet, a stylus and a
white pencil with a scrap sheet
of paper.
The stylus will not mimic
handwriting; instead, it will
feature testing tools including
highlighting and underlining.
There will also be a multitude

of annotation tools such as
numbering passages. A proctor
will still be present in the room,
but all timing will be done
electronically on the tablet itself.
In addition, there are an array
of accessibility options built into

Students have mixed feelings about
LSAT’s impending switch to digital
As students gear up for the new format, test prep professionals urge them not to worry

SAMANTHA SMALL
Daily Staff Reporter

See LSAT, Page 3A

As Election Day approaches
in Ann Arbor, development of
the Library Lot on Fifth Avenue
across from the Ann Arbor
District Library remains up for
debate.
Many City Councilmembers
are in favor of allowing Chicago-
based real estate firm Core Spaces
to develop a 17-story high-rise
called the Collective on Fifth
Avenue, while residents have
expressed desires for an urban
park and commons area. The
Collective would host 200 to 500
units, 43 workforce housing units,
and hotel and office space.
City Council sold the property
to Core Spaces in 2017.
Citizens will be asked if a
section should be added to the
city charter stating the Library
Lot
must
remain
in
public
ownership and developed as
a “Center of the City” lot. The
question, known as Proposal

Mayor asks
citizens to
vote no on
Proposal A

ANN ARBOR

Proposal would prevent
17-story high-rise from
being built on Library Lot

RACHEL CUNNINGHAM
Daily Staff Reporter

DANYEL THARAKAN /Daily

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

Check out the Daily’s News
podcast, The Daily Weekly

INDEX
Vol. CXXVIII, No. 10
©2018 The Michigan Daily

N E WS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

O PI N I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

A R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

S U D O K U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

CL A S S I F I E DS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

S P O R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 B
michigandaily.com

For more stories and coverage, visit

ANN ARBOR
LGBTQ Monologues hosts intersectional
dialogue on National Coming Out Day

DANYEL THARAKAN/Daily
Brittney Williams speaks on her experience coming out as bisexual at the LGBTQ Monologues held on National Coming Out Day in Weill Hall Thursday.

Speakers discuss identity, difficulties of being an LGBTQ student on campus at event’s second year

Oct. 11 was National Coming
Out Day, but it was also the 5-year
anniversary of Brittney Williams’s
mother’s death. As a speaker for
Out in Public’s Second Annual
LGBTQ Monologues, Williams, a
University of Michigan School of
Social Work alum, shared her story

of how she did not come out to her
mother before she passed. Williams
concluded her monologue on a
hopeful note — that her mother
would have accepted her.
Coinciding
with
National
Coming Out Day, the monologues
were held at the Ford School
of
Public
Policy
featuring
student speakers with about 150
attendees. The theme of this year’s
monologues was “More Pride.

More Color,” and the event aimed
to create a space for intersecting
identities to be represented and
heard equally.
The student presenters shared
stories and experiences in the
form of story-telling, poetry and
more. Students spoke of identities,
coming out and navigating families
and college.
“When I realized that the
monologues fell on this day, this

year, I was torn because I didn’t
know if I wanted to talk or not,”
Williams said. “But I felt like it was
important because I’ve spoken a
lot about my relationship with my
mother in every single way, except
for related to my queerness.”
Rackham student Alex Kime
presented their story through the
form of a poem titled “The Ongoing
Draft of an Ars Poetica.” Kime’s
poem covered experiences from

their childhood to now, including
their time with theater and poetry
writing.
“I began to try and dim my
shine, cried again and again at the
name Alexander,” Kime said. “Did
an impression at a cast party, and
suddenly I was Edna, it was time to
be flamboyant and loud.”

SAYALI AMIN
Daily Staff Reporter

See LIBRARY, Page 3A

Football Saturday

In the midst of 3-9 season
in 2008, Michigan had one
highlight — a comeback win
over Wisconsin at home.

» Page 1B

Conflicting
ordinances
lead to legal
questions

Councilmembers, city
employees talk opposing
police oversight proposals

LEAH GRAHAM
Daily Staff Reporter

See ORDINANCES, Page 3A

After
Michigan’s
voter
registration deadline passed
on Tuesday, campus voting
initiatives at the University of
Michigan, such as the Big Ten
Voting Challenge and Buses to
Ballots, are switching gears to
ensure students are educated
about
the
candidates
and
prepared to vote on Nov. 6.
According
to
Tufts
University’s
National
Study
of
Learning,
Voting,
and
Engagement
2017
Campus
Report,
44.7
percent
of
eligible
University
of
Michigan students voted in
the 2016 presidential election,
compared
to
50.4
percent
for all institutions. NSLVE
also reported that only 14.3
percent of eligible University of
Michigan students, compared
with 18.1 percent of students
from all institutions, voted in
the 2014 midterm elections.
In
January
2017,
Edie

‘U’, student
orgs shift
into voter
education

Previous voter registration
initiatives redirect efforts
to providing candidate info

JULIA FORD
Daily Staff Reporter

See VOTER, Page 3A

Read more at
MichiganDaily.com

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