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October 08, 2018 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily

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Music,
Theatre
&
Dance
sophomore Samantha Kao and
three other girls piled into a
gray Volkswagen on a Saturday
afternoon in the fall. These
strangers were making their way
to the grocery store.
In order to fill their pantries,
University of Michigan students
living off campus have created
grocery
carpool
trips
and
discovered
food
distribution
resources from Facebook pages
and
student
organizations.
Besides
these
student-run
methods, if someone does not
have
transportation,
finding
affordable and nutritious food on

campus can be difficult.
It is Kao’s first year in off-
campus housing, and she was not
aware of the many obstacles that
stand in the way of a student’s
access to food. She was concerned
about the time, money and
distance that play a role in getting
food in Ann Arbor. For students
living in off campus housing, an
unlimited meal plan is $2,265
per term.
“I’d like to think that there are
resources out there, but I’ve found
that there are very few. Living off
campus by yourself is a big change,
and having the time to prepare
food on your own is a concern that
my friends and I have,” Kao said.

Referencing Muslim wrestler
Khabib
Nurmagomedov’s
performance
in
an
Ultimate
Fighting Championship match
the night before, Dawud Walid
asked
Sakinah
Rahman,
a
Muslim college student wearing
a long, loose black dress paired
with a colorful headscarf, why
she dressed so conservatively in
comparison.
“That Khabib guy, he was out
there last night wearing those
short-shorts. Why do you look all
oppressed, covered up and all?”
However,
Walid’s
question
had no malicious intent. In fact,
Walid is the executive director of
Michigan’s chapter of the Council
on American-Islamic Relations, a
civil rights and advocacy group.
The question was part of an
exercise that sought to teach
young Muslims how to speak
about Islam and in some cases
answer contentious questions.
The University of Michigan
organized
the
event,
titled
“Presenting
Islam
to
Fellow
Americans,” in hopes it would
give young Muslims the tools to
articulate answers to questions
about their faith.
The training featured three
sessions: Haaris Ahmad, the
CAIR-Michigan board president,
led the first one on body language;
Asha Noor, the CAIR-Michigan
programming
and
outreach
director, led the second one on
conflict-resolution; and Walid led

third on answering frequently
asked questions.
Ahmad said the workshop
is relevant in today’s political
climate where many Americans
have questions about Muslims
and Islam.
“Obviously people are being
called upon to explain their faith,
to explain their experience, to
unfortunately have to comment
on world events even as young
college students, young teens,

when they would not have been
asked about these things in the
past,” Ahmad said. “That’s why a
training of this sort, or this type of
session, is needed.”
As a Muslim woman who
wears a headscarf, Rahman said
she is constantly asked questions,
ranging from gender equality
to daily prayer to terrorism. She
believes this workshop equipped
her with the skills needed to
articulate her beliefs.

“For me, because I choose
to cover, people are just always
asking questions,” Rahman said.
“I’m always put in a position to
where I’m not so qualified to
answer this question, but I’m their
only source right now. Because
if it’s not going to be me, they’ll
find websites that’ll give them
false information or they’ll ask

The University of Michigan’s
Law School and Ford School of
Public Policy hosted a discussion
Friday on the ties between sports
and politics. The event, titled
“Activism and Sports”, analyzed
the
misinformation
regarding
protests at sporting events. The
event was part of the Critical Race
Theory Brown Bag Lunch Series
that examines current policy and
social issues in the United States.
Law professor Sherman J.
Clark began the conversation
with a question: “Why do so
many people so often seem to
misunderstand or mischaracterize
the purpose or point of protests?”
Clark then explained why
sports have significant social
capital
in
activism,
arguing
against the separation of sports
and politics.
“Sports have social salience and
communicative impact whether
you want them to or not,” Clark
said. “The fact is, sports are
entertainment, yeah, but they are
not merely entertainment.”

michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Monday, October 8, 2018

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-EIGHT YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

Groups call
on ‘U’ to fix
campus food
insecurity

Students react to appointment of
accused assaulter to Supreme Court

CASEY TIN/Daily

CAMPUS LIFE

Student-run initiaves such as ride sharing,
food pantries made to address food desert

CATHERINE NOUHAN
Daily Staff Reporter

Brett Kavanaugh was confirmed Saturday shifting the court’s ideological balance right

Following weeks of protests,
rallies and hearings regarding
allegations of past sexual assault
Brett Kavanaugh was confirmed
Saturday to the U.S. Supreme
Court. His confirmation was

by one of the closest margins
in American history, and his
status as Supreme Court justice
solidifies a conservative majority
on the court Saturday.
Senators voted 50 to 48 nearly
along party lines — Sen. Joe
Manchin III, D-W.Va., was the
only Democrat to vote “yes” and
Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Ala., was

the only Republican who stated
she would vote “no,” but withdrew
her vote in response to Sen. Steve
Daines, R-Mont., who was not
present but would have voted
“yes.” During the vote, protests
could be heard from the Senate
floor, with chants of “shame” and
“I do not consent” ringing from
the viewing galleries after votes

were called.
When four key swing state
senators, including Republican
Sens. Susan Collins of Maine, Jeff
Flake of Arizona, and Murkowski
as well as Manchin, officially
announced their positions on
Kavanaugh prior to the final vote,
many agreed confirmation was

JORDYN BAKER
Daily Staff Reporter

Discussion
highlights
activism,
sports ties

CAMPUS LIFE

Professor Sherman Clark
frames talk through the
lens of critical race theory

TAL LIPKIN
Daily Staff Reporter









MAX KUANG/Daily
CAIR-MI Board President Haaris Ahmad, Esq., talks about discussing Islam in conversations at the Presenenting
Islam to Fellow Americans event at Rackham Assembly Hall Sunday.

MSA hosts “Presenting Islam” panel to
help Muslim students articulate faith

Organizers note heightened relevance of the event within the current political climate

ZAYNA SYED
Daily Staff Writer

Five of a kind

Michigan won its fifth-
straight game on Saturday
by dominating Maryland,
42-21, as two players set
season high marks for yards.

» Page 1B

See KAVANAUGH, Page 2A

Batteries have always fascinated
LSA junior Nando Felten. Felten,
who is from Detroit but spent
most of his life living in Germany,
was amazed by the universal use
of batteries. But what surprised
Felton even more was that the
current model for the battery has
remained largely unchanged for
the last several decades.
Now, a research assistant in
the
Undergraduate
Research
Opportunity
Program
with
plans to transfer to the College of
Engineering, Felten is on a mission
to build a better battery model.
“Batteries can be found all
around the world,” Felten said.
“Batteries today continue to be one
of the most fundamental pieces of
almost all electric power or electric
equipment
or
devices
today.
Batteries today, there hasn’t really
been a revolutionary change.”
Felten
is
one
of
many
undergraduate
LSA
students
participating in UROP who are
given the opportunity to partner
with
University
of
Michigan

Student
project to
modernize
batteries

RESEARCH

LSA junior Nando Felten
looks to create a solid state
battery through UROP

RACHEL LEUNG
Daily Staff Reporter

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

Check out the
Daily’s News
podcast, The
Daily Weekly

INDEX
Vol. CXXVIII, No. 6
©2018 The Michigan Daily

N E WS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

O PI N I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

A R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

S U D O K U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

CL A S S I F I E DS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

S P O R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 B
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