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October 05, 2018 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily

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There were a few Snapchatt-

able
moments
on
campus

Thursday.

One of them was a visit

from University alum Steve
Horowitz, vice president of
technology at Snapchat, who
gave the annual School of
Information’s
Homecoming

lecture as part of the William
Warner Bishop Lectureship
Fund.
Horowitz
discussed

the
tech
provider’s
new

advancements
and
his

professional experience.

In
his
lecture,
attended

by more than 250 students,
faculty, alumni and community
members,
Horowitz

highlighted a continuous need
for
visual
communication,

the importance of creativity
and innovation in technology,
specifically with the camera.

“Showing
is
so
much

more
compelling
than

telling someone something,”
Horowitz said. “With a simple
‘snap,’ you can express far

michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Friday, October 5, 2018

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-EIGHT YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

The
University
of

Michigan’s
Victors
for

Michigan
fundraising

campaign has raised more

than $5 billion, University
President
Mark
Schlissel

announced
Thursday
to
a

crowd of about 200 people
during his annual Leadership
Breakfast at the Ross School of
Business.

As Schlissel told the group,

the record is a nationwide
first.

“I’m thrilled to announce

here today that the University
of Michigan is now the first
public university ever to raise
$5 billion in a fundraising
campaign,”
Schlissel
said.

“It’s
the
most
successful

campaign in our history and
in the history of public higher
education.”

Schlissel’s
predecessor,

former
University

President
Mary
Sue

Schlissel announces $5 billion record
for 5-year Victors fundraising campaign
At annual Leadership Breakfast, pres. also vaguely commits to carbon neutrality

LEAH GRAHAM
Daily Staff Reporter

See SCHLISSEL, Page 2A

Nearly 200 students and

representatives
from
four

student organizations at the
University of Michigan came
together in Jeff T. Blau Hall
Thursday night for “Cultural
Crossroads,” an event designed
to unite minority groups across
lines of race, religion and
cultural heritage. LSA senior
Yezenia Sandoval, the external
director for the Latinx Alliance
for Community Action, Support
and Advocacy, had the original
idea
for
the
event,
which

included a mixture of cultural
foods, dances and dialogues.

“The main point of this

event
is
to
highlight
the

intersectionality
between

different
communities
on

campus and just celebrate our
cultural differences,” Sandoval
said. “We thought it would

Minority
orgs come
together at
Crossroads

CAMPUS LIFE

La Casa, MSA, ASA,
UAAO talk intersections
in show of solidarity

ANDREW HIYAMA

& ZAYNA SYED
Daily News Editor

& Daily Staff Reporter

DANYEL THARAKAN /Daily

University President Mark Schlissel responds to questions at his Leadership Breakfast in the Ross School of Business Thursday morning.

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

Check out the Daily’s News
podcast, The Daily Weekly

INDEX
Vol. CXXVIII, No. 5
©2018 The Michigan Daily

N E WS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

O PI N I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

A R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

S U D O K U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

CL A S S I F I E DS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

S P O R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 B
michigandaily.com

For more stories and coverage, visit

CAMPUS LIFE
Stand With Survivors protests Kavanaugh
nomination, calls for action against abuse

DANYEL THARAKAN/Daily

Protestors march chanting pro-survivor and anti-Kavanaugh slogans at the Stand with Survivors rally against the Kavanaugh confirmation originating on the Diag Thursday.

Hundred gather for rally, protest in University Diag ahead of Senate confirmation vote Friday

More than 100 students and

community members gathered
in the Diag Thursday evening
to stand with survivors and
protest
the
nomination
of

Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S.
Supreme Court. The rally was
one of dozens taking place

nationwide, all organized by
the group Women’s March.

Thursday
morning,
the

White
House
announced

the
FBI
had
concluded

an
investigation
into

accusations of sexual assault
and
misconduct
against

Kavanaugh. The investigation
was
launched
following

testimony
by
psychologist

Christine Blasey Ford, who

asserts Kavanaugh assaulted
her at a gathering in the
summer of 1982. Ford is one of
three women to publicly accuse
Kavanaugh of sexual assault or
misconduct.

Kavanagh has vehemently

denied
these
accusations,

claiming they are a partisan
attack on his nomination.

At
marches
across
the

country, survivors and allies

cried out for justice. Lindsey
Brown, a sophomore at Eastern
Michigan University, came to
Ann Arbor to be a part of the
rally.

“I think when we look back

we are going to see a clear
divide of who was on the right
side of history and who was on
the side of history that didn’t
want to listen to survivors
and the people who have been

systematically
oppressed,”

Brown said.

Rally
organizers
LSA

sophomore Michael Briggs, a
member of Progressives at the
University,
and
Washtenaw

County
Commissioner

Michelle
Deatrick,
an

organizer of Women’s March
Ann
Arbor,
opened
by

SOPHIE SHERRY
Managing News Editor

See CROSSROADS, Page 3A

See PROTEST, Page 3A

FootballSaturday

You don’t know Andrew
Robinson. He’s fine with

that.

» Page 1B

Snapchat
exec talks
future of
technology

VP of Tech Steve Horowitz
address crowd of 250
at annual UMSI lecture

ALEX HARRING

For the Daily

See SNAPCHAT, Page 3A

Schools in the Ann Arbor

Public Schools district have
been found to have elevated
levels of lead in their drinking
water.

Multiple schools measured

well over 15 ppb, including
sites at Angell Elementary
School,
Clague
Middle

School, Skyline High School,
Forsythe
Middle
School

and Burns Park Elementary
School—the last two logging
lead levels of 120 and 320
ppb, respectively. According
to the Center for Disease
Control, lead exposure can
negatively impact the nervous
system and brain development,
especially in young children.
The Environmental Protection
Agency
recommends
that

action be taken when there is
more than 15 parts per billion
of lead in water.

Jerome
Nriagu,
emeritus

professor
of
Environmental

Water tests
show high
lead levels
at AAPS

13 public schools had at
least one water source
above EPA action level

RACHEL CUNNINGHAM

Daily Staff Reporter

See LEAD, Page 3A

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