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July 05, 2018 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily

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michigandaily.com
Thursday, July 5, 2018

INDEX

Vol. CXXVII, No. 122| © 2018 The Michigan Daily
michigandaily.com

NEWS ....................................
OPINION ...............................
ARTS/NEWS..........................
MiC.........................................
SPORTS................................

MICHIGAN IN COLOR
Ignorance isn’t
the right choice
“I had forgotten saying
something is not always as

easy as you think.”


>> SEE PAGE 9

NEWS
Republican debate

Gubernatorial candidates

outline plans for Michigan’s

economy, infrastructure.

>> SEE PAGE 3

OPINION

Physics of free
speech

Julia Montag discusses

the recent lawsuit and free

speech on campus.

>> SEE PAGE 5

ARTS

Kamasi
Washington
ascends

Heaven and Earth is his

most nuanced release yet.
>> SEE PAGE 6

SPORTS
Four recruits

Michigan football recruit-

ing has been on a rampage,

signing four recruits in

three days to push them to

the third-ranked 2019 class

>> SEE PAGE 12

inside

2
4
6
9
10

Schlissel issues response to
SCOTUS travel ban ruling

U-M condemns
upholding of ban,
student orgs rally

By ALICE TRACEY

Summer Daily News Editor

University
President
Mark
Schlissel
released
a
statement
June 26 condemning the Supreme
Court’s decision to uphold President
Donald Trump’s travel ban on seven
countries, the majority of which are
predominantly Muslim.
In the response, Schlissel wrote
the University is proud to be one of
more than 30 American universities to
have filed a joint amicus brief, or legal
document submitted by non-litigants,
with the Supreme Court regarding
the travel ban. Filed in March, the
brief argues the travel ban prevents
institutions from recruiting talented
international scholars.
Schlissel also wrote the University’s
international population, comprising
students from 128 countries, enriches

the
institution
culturally
and
academically.
“Diminishing the quality and
breadth of our academic community
will threaten the aspirations for peace
and prosperity we all share,” Schlissel
wrote. “We will continue to admit
students in a manner consistent with
our non-discrimination policy, and to
those who have earned their place here,
we remain committed to fostering an
environment where all can flourish.”
According to Donya Khadem,
a
co-director
of
the
Michigan
Immigration
and
Labor
Law
Association, the travel ban is troubling
because
international
students
are a crucial part of the University
community for a variety of reasons.
“There are roughly, I think, a million
international students in the U.S. at
colleges and universities and they add
not only to the intellectual value of our
country, but they also add a lot to the
economic product of the university,”
Khadem said. “They pay money to
come, so the school is affected not only
by being not able to recruit enough talent
when this happens, but also financially.”

Khadem also said international
faculty are a valuable asset to
institutions of higher education because
their backgrounds can enhance their
teaching.
Schlissel was one of the first
university presidents to respond to the
initial executive order, signed by Trump
in January 2017
, that blocked travel
from seven Muslim-majority countries.
He maintained the University would
only
release
immigration
status
information when required by federal
law and emphasized the University’s
commitment to supporting students
regardless of their immigration status.
LSA senior Yezeñia Sandoval, the
external director of Latino student
organization La Casa, shared with
The Daily an official statement
she wrote on behalf of La Casa
in response to the travel ban. In
the statement, Sandoval praised
Schlissel for committing to not
releasing immigration status unless
absolutely necessary, but said the
University can still improve in
terms of inclusion.

Man charged
in Sharp case

Police arrest suspected
killer of retired U-M prof

By RACHEL CUNNINGHAM

Summer Daily News Editor

A man has been charged in the
homicide of 77-year-old Robert Sharp, a
retired University of Michigan chemistry
professor.
The suspect, Isom Martez-Nygel
Hamilton,was arraigned in Washtenaw
County court Friday on charges of open
murder, armed robbery, first-degree
arson, first-degree home invasion and
mutiliation of a dead body. 29-year-old
Hamilton was arrested in connection
with Sharp’s death on June 11.
Sharp
taught
chemistry
at
the
University for 39 years before retiring
in 2008. Police discovered Sharp’s body
after a welfare check was requested for
him by a neighbor after he failed to show
up to a community meeting.
Hamilton had been on parole since
November 2017 for assault of a police
officer, possession of a dangerous weapon
and first-degree arson, after serving four
years in prison for the charges.
Hamilton worked at a Wendy’s
restaurant
that
Sharp
frequented.
According to MLive, Hamilton had
burglarized Sharp’s home several times,
including stealing Sharp’s wallet and
computer.
After allegedly murdering Sharp,
Hamilton attempted to burn Sharp’s
body to cover his tracks. The officers who
performed the welfare check observed
heavy smoke residue in the home and
found Sharp in the basement of his home
on Alpine Drive. The U.S. Marshals
helped police track down their suspect.
Hamilton is currently being held
without bond and will have a preliminary
examination on July 19.
This is a developing story. Please check
back at michigandaily.com for more
details.

AARON BAKER / DAILY

ONE-HUNDRED-TWENTY SEVEN YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

Crime

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