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May 17, 2018 - Image 1

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michigandaily.com
Thursday, May 17, 2018

INDEX

Vol. CXXVII, No. 117 | © 2018 The Michigan Daily
michigandaily.com

NEWS ....................................
OPINION ...............................
ARTS/NEWS .........................
MiC.........................................
SPORTS................................

MICHIGAN IN COLOR
I miss the old
Kanye
The rapper’s fall from
grace a disappointment
to many,

>> SEE PAGE 9

NEWS
Ford program

New public policy program

funds student engagement

with organizations.

>> SEE PAGE 2

OPINION
The pay gap in
women’s sports

Marlee Burridge explores

gender equality in FIFA.

>> SEE PAGE 5

ARTS

Cannes Film
Festival
“Sorry Angel” and “Leto”
are highlights.

>> SEE PAGE 7

SPORTS
Softball prevails
over Ohio State

On Senior Day, the

Michgan softball team

defeated its biggest rival,

>> SEE PAGE 12

inside

2
4
6
9
10

Increased depression found in
high-SES Black Communities

Researcher discovers




high depression rates

even in wealthy
communities

By MATT HARMON

Daily News Editor

In an effort to quantify the

impact of racism in the United States
through statistical analysis, the New
York Times Upshot reportedlast
March that Black men, even those
raised in wealthy households similar
to their white counterparts, tended
to see their average salaries diminish
at a higher rate than white men as
they entered the workforce. Shervin
Assari’s lab at the University of
Michigan continues to study this lack
of equal outcomes between white
and Black Americans despite similar
resources, with his recent paper
finding a higher rate of depression
among high-socioeconomic status
Black citizens than white people
from similar backgrounds.

The paper, which was published

in “Brain Sciences” last month,
used data from 810 Black children
who participated in the National
Survey of American Life Adolescent
Supplement
and
tracked
the

children’s
levels
of
perceived

discrimination in relation to the rates
of 30-day, 12-month and lifetime
major depressive disorder, finding
a
positive
association
between

discrimination and depression in
these higher-SES populations.

Assari, the primary researcher

on the paper, has been conducting
research
with
this
model
of

comparing the outcomes of Black
and white American with the same
resources. This recent paper dives
into the health implications of such
a relationship. Assari maintained
this theory is not limited to this
specific study but has been explored
and continually confirmed in other
papers he has worked on and by
outside sources like the Upshot
report.

“Across the board, when you look

at the effects of economic resources
like
education,
employment,

income and you look at the health

outcome, life-expectancy, number
of years people live, chronic disease,
how much they stay healthy or
depression, you see a pattern with all
white men, particularly boys, being
… advantaged compared to Blacks,”
Assari said.

When considering variables such

as SES, with varying metrics such
as income levels, position on the
poverty index, and discrimination,
Assari’s lab took care to consider
the differences between subjective
and objective wealth. According
to Brianna Preiser, a research
technician intermediate in Assari’s
lab and the second author on the
paper, subjective wealth considers
how
well
off
people
believe

themselves to be while more
objective studies look strictly at how
high they are above the poverty
index. Preiser said the study treats
subjective SES with high regard
because the opinions and emotions
around high-SES populations can
have a very large impact on mental
health and depression rates.

AAPD says
break-ins may
be connected
A single suspect has
been identified in
several home invasions

By ABBY TAKAS

Daily Staff Reporter

The Ann Arbor Police Department

has reported as many as five of the
recent home invasions that began in
April may be related.

The suspect is a white male, 20 to

30 years in age, and 5 feet 6 inches
to 5 feet 9 inches in height. Victims
of the invasions reported he was
seen in dark clothing and in some
instances had his face covered. A
green mask was recovered at the
home invaded on the 400 block of
South Seventh St.

A resident of the home on South

Seventh Street reported she was
asleep on her couch when the
intruder attempted to rape her. The
woman fought the man off, bit him
and screamed. The suspect fled the
scene as a family member ran into
the room. The female victim was not
injured.

In two other incidents, female

residents awoke to the intruder
inside their bedrooms. A resident
living on the 1000 block of Church
St. reported she awoke to the
intruder sexually assaulting her.

Though the number of recent

home invasions have incited local
alarm, AAPD has stated the recent
series of invasions doesn’t indicate
an increase in overall break-ins for
the city. As the number of recent
home invasions have incited local
alarm, many University of Michigan
students are taking precautionary
measures.

Nursing junior Stephanie Shea,

who currently lives in Ann Arbor, is
taking steps to ensure her and her
housemates’ safety in the future.

DESIGN BY JACK SILBERMAN

ONE-HUNDRED-TWENTY SEVEN YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

Crime

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